Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

goossun

Member Since

February 12, 2004

Total number of comments

86

Total number of votes received

82

Bio

Latest Comments

The Approaching-Ubiquitous “The”

  • January 18, 2005, 2:38pm

Copy Dog,
I guess you first should clarify what you mean by “faster, cleaner and much more listenable [sic]”. These words are not grammatical terms and do not count when discussing grammar. If you know what is the function of the definite article, then you may easily see that you can’t say “guitarist, BB King” because that would combine an indefinite noun (guitarist) with a definite one (BB King) which would be contradiction in term. Because a noun in a sentence could either be definite or indefinite. It couldn’t be both.

B4 Dickens

  • January 18, 2005, 1:44pm

Steph, are you suggesting that Shakespeare spelled his words "however he wanted?"

Why ‘an’ in front of an ‘h’-word?

  • January 14, 2005, 11:06am

GP, get outa town! :-)
Some British (or Irish probably) may not pronounce the H in some words. 'Ope instead of Hope for example in Cockney accent.
You would say "an hour" because the H is mute there. So as SW said it merely depends on the pronounciation and not on the spelling. (Unless your English teacher was "an" GP!!)
Have a look at this too: http://painintheenglish.com/post.asp?id=152

Bios

  • January 3, 2005, 4:12pm

Ruth, I know theatre. I didn't know Latin! ;-)Thanks anyway.

S

  • December 30, 2004, 9:07am

Back to this again. Is in "a H" or "an H?"
With Irish accent I am sure it is "a H" because they pronounce it like "heych" but in English and American I hear something like "eych." Huh?

As some of you know my mother tongue is Persian. Because of historical reasons, which mostly has to do with the first Iranian students going abroad to France in the 18th century, most of European words, and especially the human scince terms, are pronounced in Persian with their French pronounciation. So to me Cuebec "originaly" sounds as "kebec."
But then when I began to learn English I had a hard time to adapt my ear to the English pronounciation of the words which already been part of my mother toung. So what I hear (especialy in American accent) is "kyubec." and the U is pronounced the same as the U in Cuba the way Americans pronounce it.

Films

  • December 27, 2004, 9:09am

Ananymos,
It is oUrangutan. So I think that conection is mere guess. I've read that before.

Bios

  • December 17, 2004, 4:33am

No, no, no, Thomas! You better read the post and other comments before answering.

Bios

  • December 12, 2004, 10:13pm

Well Speedius,
So we can just simply say "scenic life" instead of "scenic bios" and not be marked as hillbilly, right?

Water

  • December 6, 2004, 5:00pm

Janet,
Not everywhere in Europe. I guess it is very German. I've never been in Austria, but in Germany and Switzerland one always drinks bottled water which is bought. Tap water is never used.
In Denmark tap water is what one drinks and I think the bottled water is mostly bought by tourists. However if you ask for water in a restaurant you'll be charged anyway, yet they fill a glass from the tap.
In the south, like Spain, one never drinks water; It is not logical. Because a glass of beer is just 1 Euro!!

Questions

People(s) February 10, 2004
Gerund and Present Participle February 12, 2004
Pronounciation of TH+S February 16, 2004
Weird name February 16, 2004
Any reference? February 17, 2004
un/ir February 17, 2004
Have/halve February 18, 2004
More than a pain in the English! February 26, 2004
00′s March 3, 2004
- March 25, 2004
S April 14, 2004
Term April 14, 2004
114 April 19, 2004
Who’s this Joe? April 19, 2004
Following the Joe April 23, 2004
English schools April 26, 2004
Gerontophile? April 28, 2004
Semtex April 29, 2004
Isn’t it odd? May 6, 2004
ir May 9, 2004
G-string May 9, 2004
Be-martyred May 10, 2004
Oral vs. Aural May 11, 2004
ta-ta & ho-ho May 15, 2004
Para June 1, 2004
Am I L-deaf? June 9, 2004
Punctuation June 13, 2004
P & K June 15, 2004
...t you June 18, 2004
F word June 18, 2004
negating June 21, 2004
The June 22, 2004
Pawshop July 2, 2004
Lacking Smell July 2, 2004
At or in July 8, 2004
Y2K July 12, 2004
Example July 23, 2004
Looking for a word July 29, 2004
OK July 29, 2004
ab August 26, 2004
Mixing October 1, 2004
Fuff October 1, 2004
V-cards November 1, 2004
Bios December 6, 2004
Hairy December 11, 2004
Ya’ese December 11, 2004
BCC December 12, 2004
Films December 26, 2004
all December 31, 2004
Credit card January 6, 2005
B4 Dickens January 14, 2005
L January 30, 2005
Joke June 19, 2005
Dick & Bob July 26, 2007
Frowing October 12, 2007
Head shot October 19, 2007