Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files within 24 hours. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

 

How It Works

Take the Pain out of Proofreading!

Google Docs

Share your Doc with editor@painintheenglish.com. Within seconds, you will receive a notification with our price, and a link to place your order.

Microsoft Word

Upload your file (.docx) below:

Once we have received your order, we will edit your document within 24 hours. Our editors are American (mostly New Yorkers). We do not outsource overseas. Learn More »

Recently on Discussion Forum

In some recent fiction books written by American authors, I have seen the word “acclimated” as in “...she took a day to become acclimated to her new area.”

Shouldn’t this word be “acclimatised” or is this a case of American’s using one work and New Zealanders using another, both for the same purpose?

Read Comments

Is anyone annoyed by “double words,” such as:  Were you happy happy?  Was it fixed fixed?  Do you know how to type type?  Now, here’s a doozy:  “He’s in his office office.”  What in the heck does that mean?  I’d appreciate your feedback.

 

Read Comments

I cringe when I read (a million times a week),”I am so sorry”, I am so happy”...

It feels like there is part of the statement missing, like “I am so happy I could cry”, or “I am so sorry, I don’t  know what to say.” Is “so anything” a legitimate phrase on its own? Or am I right in thinking it needs more?

 

Read Comments

If a city and state (and full date) start a sentence in possessive form, would you consider the punctuation correct in the following two examples?

Frankfort, Kentucky’s crime rate has increased.

• Paris, France’s breathtaking sights left us in a state of raptures.

• September 11, 2001’s tragic events will forever be indelibly etched in the minds of everyone.

Please, no recasts. 

Read Comments

I run. I ran. I had ran. I had run.

I went. I had went. I had gone.

There appear to be localized aberrations where people insist on saying “had ran” even though they know “had run” is proper. They seem to be victims of conforming to local language.

This group of people seems to me to come from a region. I grew up in California, and I never saw this. I started seeing it in Colorado. It was a little more common in Kansas. It was very common in GA. It always showed up in people who had moved west from eastern locations like MA, KY, DE, VA, WV, NC. 

What is it that I am trying to say here? Peer pressure overrides language correctness? Is there a better way to refer to this?

Read Comments

Read more on discussion forum »