Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

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Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

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This is a forum to discuss the gray areas of the English language for which you would not find answers easily in dictionaries or other reference books.

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Latest Posts : Grammar

Hi everybody! Few days ago my mate attended to a job competition for a job in the technical office of Rome. Among the many legal questions there were also some English questions. The one I am asking your help for is:

“Let ……. come in.”

the possible answers proposed are:

- his

- him

- he

I am sure that all of you are thinking that the only right option to chose is “him”, that’s it.

Initially it was confirmed “his” with correct answer and after few days was corrected with “him”.

The english questions/phrases put in these competitions are generally extracted form bigger pieces, books.. and my partner didn’t answer because he says that in a certain contests it can be also right “Let his come in”, for example:

Michele is waiting for the vet to visit his cat. When the vet wants to visit Michele’s cat can say to his secretary:

<< Let his come in >> instead of << Let his cat come in>>.

What do you think? Is it possible consider both the options “his” and “him” correct?
Have you read some examples in books or articles in which you have found the phrase “Let his come in” ?


It can help my partner to obtain the job because he got a score of 20.8 and he had to get 21 to obtain the job! So it is very important the help of all of you.

Thanks !!!!!!!!!

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Sells or Sold? 

Does ‘sells’ in the sentence,”I find a pet store that sells ferrets.” stay as ‘sells’ or change to ‘sold’ if you are changing the sentence to Simple Past Tense? 

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so - Wiktionary gives these quotations:

“I can count backwards from one hundred.” “So can I.”

‘There’re another two.’ ‘So there are.’

Why is the first one inverted and the second one not? I read it somewhere that it is because the answer of the second quotation confirms the first sentence (aforementioned stuff), so it is not allowed to invert. First, I can’t find another source that corraborates this reasoning. Second, why is it not allowed to invert? There must be a specific reason for this subject–auxiliary inversion.

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Consider the sentence, “I will go home.” Is “home” a direct object, or is it part of an adverbial phrase, “to home,” with “to” elided? Since one cannot properly say, “I will go the beach,” my conclusion is that eliding “to” from “to home” is idiomatic.  

Thoughts?

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A Facebook reader complained that another commenter was incorrect to use the term “My Walmart” while speaking about the Walmart in closest proximity to her home. I use “my” like this all the time. Are we both incorrect to use the word “my” in this way, because we do not own the walmart as he points out, or is he just being a grammar prude?

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I know “I’m having trouble logging in to my account.” is correct. But is “I’m having trouble to log in” correct?

Are there some rules in using "trouble to"? I could not find sentences using “I’m having trouble to...” but I have found “not trouble to do something” like:

Nina need not trouble to come down, everything had been arranged.

Do not trouble to don your hat and gloves, Nina.

My friends never troubled to ask me what I would like.

Nina didn’t trouble to hide his disgust.

Please help me.

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Dog barking (movie’s subtitles)

Jennifer speaking (phone conversation)

Question: why “barking” instead of “IS barking”, and “speaking” instead of “IS speaking”? 

What grammar point is that? Isn’t it Present Continuous?

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1.  You don’t know how I am delighted to have you as a friend

2.  You don’t know how delighted I am to have you as a friend.

3. I hope one day I can do something for you to show you how you are lovable in my heart and mind.

4. I hope one day I can do something for you to show you how loved you are in my heart and mind.

Sentences 2 and 4 are correct; sentences 1 and 3 are not.  Please could you explain why?  Thank you.

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Is it possible to say “by the time we arrived at the cinema, the film was starting”? Or do I have to say “the film had started”? 

Both structures sound ok to me if I use another verb (sleep) instead of “start” (“by the time I got there, he was already sleeping”) so I do not know if I am using the structure right (perhaps I should use “when” and not “by the time”) or if it is the verb “start” (due to its meaning) what makes “by the time we arrived, the film was starting” sound strange. 

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I’ve read a sentence like this:

Not only did George buy the house, but he also remodeled it.

think this counts as a complex sentence, but I want to get some extra opinions.  Doesn’t “Not only did George buy the house” modify “remodeled,” thus making the first clause dependent?  In common English usage, the position of the subject “George” after “did” is fine in an interrogative sentence, but it’s not in a declarative sentence.  Does the departure from standard declarative syntax suggest that the first clause is not independent (and therefore dependent)?

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Convenient. More recently, I was also interested in this topic and looked for examples at https://papersowl.com/examples/an-analysis-of-macbeths-ambition/ in "An analysis of Macbeth's ambition" I met there. I don't know how accurate it is written and it seems to be true.

“Thanks for that”

I agree, I also think that Shakespeare is a great example to pay attention to and take the best when it comes to English and correct spelling. I also often borrow interesting ideas from examples of essays on Macbeth, as I believe that this piece is an absolute masterpiece and a lot of interesting things can be emphasized from it. As I see it, here https://papersowl.com/examples/macbeth/ you can find the best free essay examples you can find on the internet that can make your life easier and save you tons of time.

s/he

I also once became interested in this question and read a lot about it. Later I came across the freedom of speech essay on the website https://studydriver.com/freedom-of-speech-essay/ and in the essay, I was able to see how to use certain forms. It helps to understand something well if you understand the rules.

Capitalization of hyphenated words

interesting

I don't see a problem with talking the way you feel comfortable. I here say I graduated from university, although for the last couple of years, I've been working and to graduate I had to order an essay https://www.assignmenthelper.com.au/buy-research-papers almost every week. I say that because it's easier, although you could ask a similar question here. What's the correct way to say "I graduated" or "We graduated" =)

I'm a veteran writer and, since 2020, I've been seeing content everywhere that now is using "st," "nd," and "th" when writing cardinal numbers even when accompanied by month and/or year. It was only when numbers were used alone. Has this rule changed? Thanks for the editorial update, ~E

gifting vs. giving a gift

“Gift” as a verb can means something more than “give”. There is this line I see online: “Gift people the space to experience the full spectrum of emotions.” It feels different if “give” is used here. “Give” sounds like it’s something you should do, “gift” sounds like it’s something you choose to offer, something that you do not “need to do” originally.

gifting vs. giving a gift

“Gift” as a verb can means something more than “give”. There is this line I see online: “Gift people the space to experience the full spectrum of emotions.” It feels different if “give” is used here. “Give” sounds like it’s something you should do, “gift” sounds like it’s something you choose to offer, something that you do not “need to do” originally.

Idea Vs. Ideal

The fact that President Obama and VP Harris says this for “idea” is scary and Obama is a good speaker. Not sure why people think it’s the correct word. Ideal mean situation is as perfect as it can get. Idea is just a thought (a light bulb).