Submitted by Ion-Sturm  •  March 31, 2013

Anyways

Do excuse the purposeful misspelling in my name. It comes from a time where I thought doing such was what the “cool” kids did.

Anyways, I have a question, which just so happens to concern the word I used to start this sentence. I find myself using “anyways” instead of “anyway”, despite it not being “correct”. It’s more a matter of it feeling like it rolls off of the tongue better than any hard reason. If someone can offer their thoughts on its use (or misuse) I would be most appreciative.

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It seems to be dialectal (MWDEU), or informal (Oxford Online). Anyways, you're in good company: both Dickens and Joseph Conrad used it. And in connection with your other question - it is, of course, an adverb.

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What Warsaw Will said. It's only used in North American English, to my knowledge, or at least it's never used in British English. When I moved from Canada to England as a kid, my classmates teased me mercilessly about saying "anyways." They'd repeat, "British Anyways," a pun on "British Airways." :D

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