Comments for Pain in the English http://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Sun, 24 Jul 2016 05:53:37 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on “ask the gays” by jayles the unread http://painintheenglish.com/case/5651/#comment-26882 jayles the unread Sat, 23 Jul 2016 14:31:16 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5651/#comment-26882 Technically the grammar is ok; it is just that by using "the" one almost tends to suggest that all gays are one homogenous group who think alike. There is a discussion about this here:
http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=26223

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Comment on “enamored with” and “enamored by” by juliantepper1@gmail.com http://painintheenglish.com/case/4717/#comment-26881 juliantepper1@gmail.com Sat, 23 Jul 2016 09:36:08 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4717/#comment-26881 I'm not at all surprised that no one cited from Oscar Horace's second (1913) publication, "Word and Phrase Sources and Usage: Adjectival and Advebial Etymologies and Preposition Connectors," which he dedicated to his father, Horatio, and his daughter, Amelia.

Horace explains the French usages, as for instance ), "Je suis amoureaux d'Amelia.," of which the English translation is, "I am enamored of Amelia."

He was greatly surprised that, born of the English casual pronunciation of that phrase, an artisan created a tiny glazed bird he called the "Enamor Dove," to be used when words fail the suitor who wants her to be apprised of the depth of his love for her. (In marketing the artisan, at fairs, emphasized that the Enamor Dove exemplifies a a level of courtship that is far beyond the turtle dove stage).

Anyway, the Enamored Dove was oft-bought throughout the British Isles.

And, explains Horace, the product increased the popular usage of "I am enamored of."

Ultimately, Horace's 13 volumes of his word-usage explanations were replaced by more recent books authored by others beginning in the 1880s. Nothing replaced the Enamored Dove, and it was soon forgotten. Foolishly, Horace was against copyrighting and his volumes were not reprised. Libraries, always in need of shelf space, discarded the Horace 13 volumes or stacked them in their basement. Apparently, none of them now exists, either.

Luckily, a friend from Cambridge U, Divad Saratla, visited Washington, DC and was introduced at a party to a huge defensive lineman and they became fast friends. When David learned about his new friend's verbal deficiencies caused by dyslexia, he showed one of the Horace volumes to him, of which the football player became enamored. David gave to him all 13 of the Horace volumes.

I have no idea if any volumes are extant. After years of contacting the usual suspects (forgive me, Sam), and as I now unable to continue, I suppose that Horace's works, to the extent some still may exist, are lodging in a few private homes.

Cheers,
JuTep

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by doug http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26880 doug Tue, 19 Jul 2016 18:12:34 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26880 Speedwell - I understand "affected overcorrectness" and "we don't use accent marks in English." But it's nice to have a clear difference between "re-zoom" and "rez-oo-may," and the accents clearly eliminate any ambiguity.

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Allan Lolly http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26879 Allan Lolly Tue, 19 Jul 2016 13:32:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26879 In court, it is common for attorneys and judges to state someone "pled guilty" in the past. I was a criminal prosecutor as well as defense attorney for years and I rarely heard the utterance, "pleaded," in oral discourse. I'm not sure what global marketplace carries more weight than daily use in the courtroom.

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Comment on Hi all vs. Hi everybody by John Kunal http://painintheenglish.com/case/681/#comment-26878 John Kunal Mon, 18 Jul 2016 08:41:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/681/#comment-26878 I have never understood why we address "Dear". I prefer using it only for personal mails only. Like family and friends. Refering to the discussion here may I suggest "Hello xyz team" on professional mails. Usage of "Hello all" is certainly not the correct way but a more assimilated and tolerated approach.

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Comment on Is “much” plural? by czachi prieto http://painintheenglish.com/case/172/#comment-26877 czachi prieto Sun, 17 Jul 2016 06:38:44 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/172/#comment-26877 please

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Melony http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26876 Melony Thu, 14 Jul 2016 20:45:37 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26876 I can not bring myself to say "texted". It sounds grammatically incorrect. I use "text", in past, present and future conversations. It may not be correct, but I have not found anything to say what "is" grammatically correct. I will continue my way until it is proven wrong!

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by Hestia http://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-26875 Hestia Tue, 12 Jul 2016 19:38:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-26875 The word for an intentional incomplete sentence is ellipsis, and the word for 'writing in an accent' (ex: ya'll) is diction, if I remember correctly. Not sure if there is a term for intentional improper spelling, though...

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Comment on First Generation vs. Second Generation by Victoria00 http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26874 Victoria00 Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:25:03 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26874 So if our parents are from other contry (mexico)& we are born in the U.S. (americans)then our kids will be Caucasian???

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Comment on and so... by gayathri http://painintheenglish.com/case/4559/#comment-26873 gayathri Sat, 9 Jul 2016 07:05:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4559/#comment-26873 The velocity enhancers are frictionally contact with the inner side of the tube wall, and they extend the contact surface of the water flowing through them, so, they reduce the plate temperature.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-26872 Hairy Scot Fri, 8 Jul 2016 23:54:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-26872 @Sandie

Neither, because I don't have the music in me.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Sandie http://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-26871 Sandie Wed, 6 Jul 2016 20:38:04 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-26871 What sentence would you rather use? I have the music in me. or I've got the music in me.

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Comment on “pi the type” by MT http://painintheenglish.com/case/2585/#comment-26870 MT Tue, 5 Jul 2016 19:06:56 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/2585/#comment-26870 My take was that the letter pi "π" was not often used, ergo as it was pretty useless for most compositing. When the type is spilled they are all, like π, pretty useless until they are sorted back into the correct trays.

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Comment on thus, therefore and hence are different by jayles the undead http://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-26869 jayles the undead Sun, 3 Jul 2016 16:39:05 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-26869 @ntc you might like to consider "and have remained so".

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Comment on thus, therefore and hence are different by mtc http://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-26868 mtc Sun, 3 Jul 2016 16:25:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-26868 Would this be a proper way to end a sentence with thus?

In my first year of graduate school, my writing classes quickly became my favorite classes and have remained thus.

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Comment on “provide” vs “give” information by david tribbeck http://painintheenglish.com/case/5646/#comment-26867 david tribbeck Sat, 2 Jul 2016 14:49:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5646/#comment-26867 provide is more professional sounding.

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Comment on Canadian pronunciation of “out and about” by david tribbeck http://painintheenglish.com/case/4413/#comment-26866 david tribbeck Sat, 2 Jul 2016 14:43:46 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4413/#comment-26866 We(Vancouver) used to talk to a person from Newfoundland
a fair amount and my daughter could immediately tell from where he was from.We also know a lady from New York State who has a slight accent but certainly not Texan.She came here for the 2010 olympics.

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Comment on “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive by Derrick http://painintheenglish.com/case/5042/#comment-26865 Derrick Fri, 1 Jul 2016 14:26:09 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5042/#comment-26865 No this is not correct. It should read "I so appreciate you taking Gregg's and my child to school today".

You must remember that each individual should be able to stand on its own. You wouldn't say "...taking mine child..." you would say "...taking my child..."

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Comment on Horizontal Stripes? by Shippwreck http://painintheenglish.com/case/5185/#comment-26864 Shippwreck Thu, 30 Jun 2016 04:33:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5185/#comment-26864 We just had this very discussion in the office which brought me here... the boss believes they are Hoops, however, 6 colleagues in the office, 1 of the colleagues wives and even the bosses 13 year old daughter all agree... definitely... Stripes. Some say that for clothing Stripes implies vertical and that they would call them Horizontal Stripes... but all agree that Hoops is not the correct term for it.

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Comment on Might could by vgb http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26863 vgb Wed, 29 Jun 2016 21:53:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26863 I am from all over, but my parents are from Idaho, so I'm not sure the regions identified in previous posts have a monopoly on the form. Anyway, I inherited "might could" from one of parents, and find it very useful. The way I use it, it deflates the less cooperative "might," alone as in "I might do that," which sounds like a teenager challenging an authority figure.

"I might could do that" suggests a willingness to try rather than an insouciant "I might," as in "if I feel like it."

I have a BA in English and an MA in teaching English as a Second Language. If one of my international students used "might could," I would be over-joyed. There are so many worse "infractions" with modals. Believe me, I see them every day.

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Comment on all _____ sudden by vgb http://painintheenglish.com/case/483/#comment-26862 vgb Wed, 29 Jun 2016 20:11:07 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/483/#comment-26862 I hear "all the sudden" in interviews on NPR. I agree with asheibar that such colloquialisms emerge because they are heard and passed on, but not seen in written text. It reminds me of the occasion someone had written on the blackboard, "It's a doggy dog world." Clearly, whoever wrote this had never seen the written version, "It's a dog eat dog world." Well, marzy dotes and dozey dotes and little lambsy divey" !

It does not bother me that colloquialisms emerge and colonize the language; what bothers me is that it seems that reading is becoming a quaint, anachronistic habit performed by backward looking people who haven't caught on that it's all in the tweet.

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Comment on First Generation vs. Second Generation by Art http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26861 Art Wed, 29 Jun 2016 10:00:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26861 The term "First" or "Second Generation", omits the obvious, first or second generation "American". If we say that those who immigrated are the 1st, then by definition their children are 2nd. But that poses a problem, not everyone who immigrates becomes an "American" (11 million are not even legal residents). Although a bit confusing because many of them (I am one of them) do end up becoming American, for clarity, we need to start calling only those who are born here the First Generation.

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by A Lego Fan http://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-26860 A Lego Fan Mon, 27 Jun 2016 23:21:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-26860 It's always been LEGO to me (caps or not). I see people who use "Legos" as casual consumers of the product, and should have no business writing about LEGO for public viewing.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by benjamin1 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26859 benjamin1 Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:29:14 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26859 Did I get an earful on a "Hey!" when I was in London!!

The concierge in my apartment really took offence when I casually greeted him - "Hey!"

I got something on these lines:
"That's very disrespectful of you. How dare you 'hey' me?!"

So I have been ever so careful when using "hey" over a "hi" or a "hello". I thought this was a very English thing, but quite surprising to find quite a few English folks on this page to be okay with "hey".

Hey, what the heck!

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Comment on Might could by jeb http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26858 jeb Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:08:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26858 I might could say something about snobby grammarians...bless their hearts...but I won't.

As a well educated native of southern Appalachia (BA in English; PhD in Education), I can say with confidence that might could is mighty useful modal construction that conveys nuance and a sophisticated appreciation of the historical English, at least as spoken by the Scotch Irish settlers who populated these parts.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_English

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26857 Hairy Scot Sat, 25 Jun 2016 17:36:35 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26857 Oops.
Forgive the extra line in my previous post.
A thought that died at birth.

:)

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26856 Hairy Scot Sat, 25 Jun 2016 17:33:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26856 We could call it "oblique speech", or even "roundabout speech", or we could use a derivative of euphemism, metaphor, or allegory.
I am sure there a a number of terms that could be used to avoid the inevitable confusion caused by the use of the term "indirect speech" in this context.
.
Perhaps a simpler solution would be to refer

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Comment on Someone else’s by Don http://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26855 Don Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:04:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26855 An adverb, such as else, cannot be made possesive. That is reserved for nouns and pronouns. Else cannot be made in a possesive form. If used, it is poor English.

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Comment on “Rack” or “Wrack”? by OJ http://painintheenglish.com/case/5371/#comment-26854 OJ Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:59:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5371/#comment-26854 Doesn't look good on proofreading site to find: "tends ton go along" (on this page)

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Comment on Everybody vs. Everyone by Lumme Celli http://painintheenglish.com/case/1022/#comment-26853 Lumme Celli Wed, 22 Jun 2016 12:57:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/1022/#comment-26853 I´d like to thank you all for this nice help ( :

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Comment on Texted by mary jane parker http://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-26852 mary jane parker Wed, 22 Jun 2016 08:40:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-26852 we don't say look-ed --- we say looked.

therefore -- texted, as in looked

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Diana Kay http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26851 Diana Kay Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:50:45 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26851 I need to write out 65.25476% for a document. Can you help

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26850 jayles the unwoven Mon, 20 Jun 2016 00:28:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26850 Whilst I agree that the term "indirect speech" has almost always been used in writing to refer to "reported speech", it has on occasion been used to refer to oblique or circuitous ways of addressing a topic. For instance, in some tome on Quakerism from 1808:

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=bNQ3AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA16&dq=%22indirect+speech%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiC6JPy37XNAhWEi5QKHbBkB844ChDoAQhBMAk#v=onepage&q=%22indirect%20speech%22&f=false

and in Judson's Burmese-English dictionary 1893 "this speech is indirect and circuitous":

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=LSEYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA258&dq=%22speech+is+indirect%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo36aQ37XNAhULFpQKHQ_HD_gQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=%22speech%20is%20indirect%22&f=false

The question for you would be if the term "indirect speech" is not to be used for these types of polite roundabout ways of addressing a topic, what other terminology could be used?

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26849 jayles the unwoven Mon, 20 Jun 2016 00:27:31 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26849 Whilst I agree that the term "indirect speech" has almost always been used in writing to refer to "reported speech", it has on occasion been used to refer to oblique or circuitous ways of addressing a topic. For instance, in some tome on Quakerism from 1808:

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=bNQ3AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA16&dq=%22indirect+speech%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiC6JPy37XNAhWEi5QKHbBkB844ChDoAQhBMAk#v=onepage&q=%22indirect%20speech%22&f=false

and in Judson's Burmese-English dictionary 1893 "this speech is indirect and circuitous":

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=LSEYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA258&dq=%22speech+is+indirect%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo36aQ37XNAhULFpQKHQ_HD_gQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=%22speech%20is%20indirect%22&f=false

The question for you would be if the term "indirect speech" is not to be used for these types of polite roundabout ways of addressing a topic, what other terminology could be used?

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Comment on couple vs couple of by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26848 Hairy Scot Sun, 19 Jun 2016 19:43:33 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26848 It is all part of an evil American plot to eliminate prepositions.

:)

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Comment on couple vs couple of by Carmen Ficarra http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26847 Carmen Ficarra Sat, 18 Jun 2016 16:37:38 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26847 Think of all the apples in the world. You just want two apples. So you choose "a couple of" them. That's how I see it. Perhaps some people confuse "a couple apples" with "a few apples." Interesting how they do get "few" right: No one says, "a few of apples." Seems people should be able to keep the two separate without using up too much brain power.

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by mary Pat olson http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26846 mary Pat olson Thu, 16 Jun 2016 10:23:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26846 Is "there her is! correct?

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by mary olson http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26845 mary olson Thu, 16 Jun 2016 10:20:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26845 I play a game with my grandchild: Put her blanket over her head and ask where she is...she pulls it down and I say "there her is!" Is this correct English?

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by William Hagerbaumer http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26844 William Hagerbaumer Thu, 16 Jun 2016 03:10:49 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26844 I guess it's my age 81, but fought rather than fit or fighted as past tense for fight seems right to me. However, lit rather than lighted as past tense for light seems right to me. I guess to be consistent Joshua should have fit the battle of Jericho as the song says. I certainly do not go along with lighted or fighted although I have never heard fighted. Of course, I am a fan of fled over fleeded and pled over pleaded although my spell checker is not.

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by Akira http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26843 Akira Mon, 13 Jun 2016 12:17:20 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26843 No Woman No Cry is a reference to Englands prior control of Jamaica. "Woman" is a reference to the Queen of England. They used to protest in Trench Town all night long against England. A purely political song.

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Steffi http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26842 Steffi Sun, 12 Jun 2016 05:45:18 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26842 Basil Hallward paints a picture of his pure and beautiful friend Dorian Gray. It is the best portrait Basil has ever drawn. While posing for it, Dorian met Lord Henry, another friend of Basil‘s, who has a bad influence on him. Basil said that he want to finish the picture today.Henry and Dorian went in the garden. Basil painted alone in the hause. Two houers later Basil cried:,, The Picture is ready. Dorian and Henry come in the room. They said that the picture was beautiful. Dorian said:,, I wish I could ever always be young, and the portrait could grow old. Basil gives Dorian his image. A few months later tells Dorian Lord Henry that he has fallen in love with an actress. Dorian went every night in the theater to see his Sibyl Vane. After the show he goes backstage and talks with Sibyl Vane. She calls him Prince Charming. Sibyl tells her mother and her brother James Vane that she is in love with Dorian Gray. Her mother find this not so beautiful, because she wants a son in law with a lot of money. Her brother James says that he kills Dorian when he hurt his sister. James is sailing with a ship for a few weeks to Australia. Dorian says that he wants to marry Sibyl. Lord Henry goes to see with Dorian to the theater to Sibyl again. That evening Sibyl plays very poorly. Lord Henry is outraged about that and he goes home. Dorian goes back behind the stage and he finds Sibyl wines. They talk to each other and she promises him that she makes even better on the next night. Dorian comes home late. He goes to the library where he has his portrait. He sees the image that not looks young it looks a little bite older. He is very shocked by that and he hides the image so that nobody can see it. A few days later comes his friend Basil. He wants the image to see but Dorian shows it is not him . Basil told Dorian the Sibyl is dead . Dorian is shocked . Dorian goes with Basil in the Bublothek and shows him the picture . Basil looks scared . Then Dorian takes a knife and kills Basil. The next day meets Dorian Alan Campbell. Dorian told him all over the dead body. He wants the dead body disappears with a strong acid. Alan Campbell is a chemist. Dorian shows him the dead body. Alan makes him disappear with an acid. At midnight comes Dorian on the harbor walk. Suddenly someone accesses he on the shoulder and keeps a weapon at the head. It is James the brother of Sibyl. Dorian talks to him and finally leaves James Dorian run. A few weeks later, Dorian meets Lord Henry with. They talk about the last six weeks. At night Dorian goes to the library. He looks at the picture. On picture is not a young one but a very old one. The man on the picture has bloody fingers and the feet’s. Dorian cries out against the terrible picture. Dorian takes a knife and stabs the picture. The caretaker has heard the scream and he ran into the library. He finds a young picture of Dorian Gray and an old man that lies on the floor.

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by Carole Peters http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26841 Carole Peters Sat, 11 Jun 2016 19:00:43 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26841 My Post office asked me to change my street number to their street number for package delivery. Also change my PO Box number to Unit number. Now, I got a letter from one of my Credit Reporting agencies saying that one of my creditors reported that I have moved to a different address without telling them so I need to clear this up. i suppose this was supposed to make it easier for them deliver packages but it has resulted in unintended consequences for me. Should I write to each Credit Reporting Agency and explain that "No, I haven't moved. The Post Office just said I would have to write in a different street address or they would send any packages back without delivering them to me?"

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Comment on First Generation vs. Second Generation by Brian Bissonnette http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26840 Brian Bissonnette Sat, 11 Jun 2016 14:33:07 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26840 Speaking of Generations and who was or what was the first Generation called brings me directly to the old school of defining Generations. Being a Christian, it must be said that God created the first Generation and it grew in names and in stature from then. How simple does it get from that perspective? Your thoughts?

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Comment on Hi all vs. Hi everybody by RAFAFA http://painintheenglish.com/case/681/#comment-26839 RAFAFA Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:43:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/681/#comment-26839 RAFAFAF

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Comment on As wet as ? by Alfie http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26838 Alfie Sat, 11 Jun 2016 10:12:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26838 As wet as a spastics chin

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Comment on “pi the type” by Murray Kroma http://painintheenglish.com/case/2585/#comment-26837 Murray Kroma Fri, 10 Jun 2016 12:19:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/2585/#comment-26837 I remember the term as "pi the case", new it well. My boss called me clumsy.

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Comment on He was sat by Brus Watters http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26836 Brus Watters Wed, 8 Jun 2016 10:57:58 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26836 I agree wholeheartedly. When books which win prizes include passages in dialect I am not persuaded that therefore dialect is proved to be Standard English, as Tom Welch seemed to be arguing there. I am not sure that I go along with "there is no oral English tests", however, simply on the grounds of sing./plur. number. The tests are neglected because the teachers are lefties and think it would be seen as class discrimination. Bring back Latin, I insist.

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Comment on He was sat by Shay Kinsella http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26835 Shay Kinsella Wed, 8 Jun 2016 10:12:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26835 It is most annoying when the words "Sat" and "Stood" are misused instead of sitting, seated, and standing. What also annoys me is the misuse of reflexive pronouns like myself or yourself instead of me and you. Unfortunately English is not taught in schools but it is more the appreciation of prose, poetry and drama. There is no oral English tests to see if students can speak properly. Grammar is totally neglected.

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by Grits http://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-26834 Grits Tue, 7 Jun 2016 18:54:48 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-26834 Grammar Intentionally Incorrect (or GII).
Insert cute emotji here.

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Comment on “as long as” vs. “so long as” by Shaymaa awad http://painintheenglish.com/case/2475/#comment-26833 Shaymaa awad Tue, 7 Jun 2016 09:40:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/2475/#comment-26833 Thank you very much I 'm English teacher and I want to improve my language especially conversations how can you help me ? Thanks alot

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