Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Wed, 22 Feb 2017 01:41:54 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Is it acceptable to say “higher than” when you mean “as high as”? by Harambe667 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27180 Harambe667 Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:41:38 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27180 email me at harambe@idied.com
I dunno

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Comment on Is it acceptable to say “higher than” when you mean “as high as”? by Harambe667 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27179 Harambe667 Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:41:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27179 email me at harambe@idied.com
I dunno

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Comment on Plural of Yes by Harambe https://painintheenglish.com/case/4396/#comment-27178 Harambe Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:39:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4396/#comment-27178 Help me i dont know what to do B-)

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Comment on Right Question For this Answer (about count/rank/order) by Helping Hand https://painintheenglish.com/case/250/#comment-27177 Helping Hand Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:38:51 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/250/#comment-27177 As I answered to my friend, I found below answer is perfect for that,

"what is the position of Jawaharlal Nehru among Indian prime ministers??"

You can use this if you want.

Hope it will help you

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Comment on X and S by Amy Pickett https://painintheenglish.com/case/550/#comment-27176 Amy Pickett Fri, 17 Feb 2017 12:43:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/550/#comment-27176 How do I make the name Fox in possessive plural form?
Ex. Ms. Fox' instructional practices... or Ms. Fox's instructional practices...

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Comment on He was sat by Marusja https://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-27175 Marusja Fri, 17 Feb 2017 07:04:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-27175 I can see that there is a long and diverse discussion on here, but my response is to you Brus, hailing from the British Isles. The epidemic as you rightly describe it, seems to be spreading contagion like from the BBC and into written material. "I was sat" and "we were stood" are examples of colloquial terms from the North of England. Dialects are unique to an area and rich in expression when used in an authentic way and don't appear out of place.

The reason we may be startled by the sudden introduction of such vernacular is due to it simply being out of place when spoken by someone who has been educated in the Queen's English. It rankles because it is wrong in our ears. Unfortunately, this is a legacy of inverted class snobbery whereby some people think that they should downgrade the language in order not to sound 'posh'. It backfires spectacularly though upon them when they try so hard to fit in with the crowd, rather than represent the side of 'well spoken'. I cringe whenever I hear these dialects out of place, not just because of the infringement but also because it doesn't sound beautiful or harmonious, but clumsy.

My mother couldn't speak English when she arrived in the country shortly after WW2. By listening to the radio and armed with a dictionary and the daily newspaper, she taught herself through these mediums. Later she read to us as children and took us to the library, where I inherited a love of the language, reading several books a week by the time I was 7 years old.

Although we lived in the Midlands, I didn't have a regional accent since my exposure early on had been to programmes such as 'Women's Hour' and radio presenters in those days all and without fail spoke to a standard considered appropriate. After all, they were communicating to all and needed to be understood widely.

On passing the eleven plus exam and entering Grammar school, we had a Headmaster and a Head Mistress. Miss Simister had a passion for the English language and heaven forbid any pupil who might drop an H or flatten a vowel. I felt right at home there.

It wasn't about being elite, it was about learning and knowledge. It was about aiming for excellence and drawing out the best in oneself.

Miss Simister would turn in her grave were she to hear the downfall of the language. As someone born and raised in the UK, I can assure you that the standards have slipped considerably. It isn't possible for someone learning the language to be sure that they are being taught English correctly if studying here.

I am not speaking out against dialects as they remain an integral part of our culture. To introduce a convoluted invasion however into received pronunciation is noticeably discordant, drawing attention in the wrong way. It becomes an interruption and tunes out whatever the speaker might be conveying.

There is hope though. Apparently when asked, people do prefer the sublime eloquence of the spoken word as voiced by Joanna Lumley and Diana Rigg, recognizing these dulcet tones to be vehicles of quality, easy on the ear and without question completely trustworthy ambassadors of English in all its glory.

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by Charlotte J Safrit https://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-27174 Charlotte J Safrit Thu, 16 Feb 2017 08:05:57 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-27174 It means, if the woman is gone, there will be no tears. It is a reference to the queen and her rule of Jamaica at the time. It's a political song.

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Comment on Is it acceptable to say “higher than” when you mean “as high as”? by jay1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27173 jay1 Thu, 16 Feb 2017 06:36:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27173 Hey, I'll let you in on a little secret. We don't all love our jobs every day. And doing something you have a passion for doesn't make the work part of it any easier...It just makes you less likely to quit. What Everybody Ought To Know About #NorwichJobs - Discover something new TODAY at: http://www.justnorfolkjobs.co.uk/jobs-in-norwich/

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Comment on fill in the blanks! by Sheri https://painintheenglish.com/case/313/#comment-27172 Sheri Wed, 15 Feb 2017 16:23:51 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/313/#comment-27172 I have a release of all claims and above the notary & witness signatures, there is this statement:
WITNESS___________ hand and seal this ______ day of _________, 2017; what is put in after WITNESS?

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Comment on Idea Vs. Ideal by FrankR https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27171 FrankR Tue, 14 Feb 2017 21:18:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27171 I think that using ideal when idea should be the correct word is a silly way to speak. I hear ideal used incorrectly all the time, it really gets on my nerves. Oh well...

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Comment on How many “ands” in a row by Josh S. https://painintheenglish.com/case/492/#comment-27170 Josh S. Mon, 13 Feb 2017 15:18:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/492/#comment-27170 Wouldn't it have been clearer if quotation marks had been placed before Peg, and between Peg and and, and and and And, and And and and, and and and And, and And and and, and and and Whistle, as well as after whistle?" This sentence is much easier to read because the writer placed commas between and and and and and and And, and and and and And and and And and and, and and And and and and and and and And, and and and and And and and And and and, and and And and and and and and and.

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Comment on Is it acceptable to say “higher than” when you mean “as high as”? by Lexo https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27169 Lexo Mon, 13 Feb 2017 14:27:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27169 Twice what it was (= 2x).

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Comment on He was sat by marie https://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-27168 marie Mon, 13 Feb 2017 13:14:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-27168 Sorry, but your argument doesn't make sense to me. If you were teaching science you would give your students the correct formula. I think the tragedy is that in the UK grammar hasn't been taught for so long, a lot of people who try to teach English don't understand enough to do this effectively. I certainly wouldn't have any respect for a teacher who didn't teach me correctly.

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Comment on Stress pattern in the word ‘totalitarian’ by jaiden porter https://painintheenglish.com/case/149/#comment-27167 jaiden porter Sun, 12 Feb 2017 18:17:01 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/149/#comment-27167 This website was really useless and was no help to me. All I wanted to know was the tension/stress of totalitarianism and it did not give me anything. This website is useless ad it should be taken down. It will be know help to anyone.

Thank You

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Comment on Using country name as an adjective? by Patrick Walter https://painintheenglish.com/case/5261/#comment-27166 Patrick Walter Sat, 11 Feb 2017 14:33:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5261/#comment-27166 I find it extremely irritating and quite frankly a little disrespectful. I have yet to see it used to describe America or Britain people but if I fall off a scooter on a Greek island I may now need to see a 'Greece doctor' !?

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Comment on from among by Иван Гарбуз https://painintheenglish.com/case/4971/#comment-27165 Иван Гарбуз Thu, 9 Feb 2017 03:19:18 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4971/#comment-27165 тогда - among, это также, существительное, а почему во всём интернете нет указания на это свойство

What’s the difference between “among” and “from among”? Do you select a winner “from” the list of participants or “from among” the list of participants?

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Comment on Comma before “respectively”? by Kaz Vaz https://painintheenglish.com/case/4616/#comment-27164 Kaz Vaz Sun, 5 Feb 2017 08:49:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4616/#comment-27164 To the chair of the governors and governors, respectively,
(is this the right way to open a letter?)

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Comment on Substantial vs. substantive by james1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1080/#comment-27163 james1 Sat, 4 Feb 2017 06:08:24 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1080/#comment-27163 Substantive has replaced substantial for no good reason, as far as I can tell, other than fashion and (now rather threadbare) novelty, in the same way the cumbersome "impactful" (is that even a word?) is often heard in place of the utilitarian but presumably old-fashioned "effective."

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Comment on Possessive with acronyms ending in S by Donovan https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27162 Donovan Fri, 3 Feb 2017 10:15:13 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27162 Looks like both ways are fine, as long as you stay consistent:
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/apostrophe-catastrophe-part-two

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Comment on Possessive with acronyms ending in S by Annaliese Gottschalk https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27161 Annaliese Gottschalk Fri, 3 Feb 2017 10:08:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27161 How do you properly punctuate the name of a company such as "Coffee Brewing Specialists" when you want to show possession? Is it the Coffee Brewing Specialists's team, or the Coffee Brewing Specialists' team?

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Comment on who vs. whom by Deutschlehrer https://painintheenglish.com/case/5018/#comment-27160 Deutschlehrer Thu, 2 Feb 2017 01:35:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5018/#comment-27160 RFMacG:
"it gives you and I a way to..."
Nope. "It gives you and me a way to..." is correct.
As for who and whom, the grammar is simple: "who" is nominative (a subject), while "whom" is one of three types of object. It can be a direct object, as in "Whom did you see?"; it can be the object of a preposition, as in "From whom did she receive the camera?"; it can even be an indirect object ("Whom did you send the letter?") but this usage is awkward and rarely used in English, whether American or British, where "To whom did you send the letter?" is generally preferred.
But I always teach my students that the rules of grammar are transitory; usage will ultimately prevail. As the usage of "whom" steadily diminishes, the rules will fold under the will of the speakers of the language, becoming by turn arcane, then obscure, and ultimately, extinct. This is natural; it is the organic nature of language.
Because I teach German, I have to take care to let my students know that the rules governing the German equivalents of "who" and "whom" are still observed and that mistakes can truly change the meaning of of what they say or write. But German, like English, is subject to the same trend toward change, so I freely acknowledge that I may someday, in some circumstances, be teaching entirely different rules.
Tschüss!

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by laurie winsor https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27159 laurie winsor Wed, 1 Feb 2017 08:39:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27159 I saw this sentence in a story and it didn't sound correct. What do you think? Here is the sentence..... She wondered if her and her friends could build it. I thought it should be....She wondered if she and her friends could build it. Which is it?

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Esogunro@yahoo.com https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27158 Esogunro@yahoo.com Mon, 30 Jan 2017 18:06:42 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27158 Hey is fast becoming the silent language of lovers. It speaks volumes though only one word is spoken. It's a deep expression of emotional feelings from one or both parties. It is softly spoken and sometimes can't be heard by 3rd parties present but the two minds that are connected. Mostly used when there's a barrier to loving each other openly, often used in electronic messaging to call each others attention or to just say "I'm missing you " while playing safe in case the message drops into wrong hands, then it can be easily classified as "an ordinary greeting"

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Comment on Plural last name ending in “z” by Max Matias https://painintheenglish.com/case/3549/#comment-27157 Max Matias Sat, 28 Jan 2017 07:20:14 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3549/#comment-27157 According to English ,we must add es to family names ending in Z,X,sh.

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Comment on Twenty-ten vs Two thousand-ten by stephen2 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4273/#comment-27156 stephen2 Fri, 27 Jan 2017 19:09:49 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4273/#comment-27156 you're not the only one.
it grinds my gears everytime i hear someone say two thousand seventeen, or sixteen or fifteen.
did they say fourteen hundred and ten in 1410? no, they said fourteen ten.
2001-2009 is fine as two thousand nine, anyone that thinks it should be pronounced twenty O nine doesn't get it at all.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Natalka https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27155 Natalka Thu, 26 Jan 2017 11:54:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27155 Ang ive got a
Do you like this skateboard
I havent got

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Comment on “Anglish” by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/4392/#comment-27154 Hairy Scot Thu, 26 Jan 2017 02:18:54 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4392/#comment-27154 MIGHTEN!!??

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Comment on “Anglish” by Juanita Caldwell https://painintheenglish.com/case/4392/#comment-27153 Juanita Caldwell Wed, 25 Jan 2017 01:26:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4392/#comment-27153 Is this sentence right? It might snow; mighten it? Mighten means- it might will snow. It's like making a statement and asking a question at the same time but the question is directed at another person as in asking the other person's opinion.

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Comment on “Tilting at Windmills” by None of your business bla bla bla bla https://painintheenglish.com/case/299/#comment-27152 None of your business bla bla bla bla Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:01:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/299/#comment-27152 Ty, for asking me to put a comment, but it is still "NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS".

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Comment on “Tilting at Windmills” by None of your business https://painintheenglish.com/case/299/#comment-27151 None of your business Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:01:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/299/#comment-27151 Ty, for asking me to put a comment, but it is still "NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS".

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Comment on As of by Piper https://painintheenglish.com/case/4162/#comment-27150 Piper Sun, 22 Jan 2017 07:17:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4162/#comment-27150 Can we say: I'll send the minutes of the meeting as of 5 pm?

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Comment on First annual vs. second annual by Burt https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27149 Burt Thu, 19 Jan 2017 23:51:33 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27149 If I am correct and an annual event requires 2 years prior to an event for it to be considered an annual event. Then isn't the term "second annual" incorrect as well? Actually it should be referred to as consecutive meaning second? Looking forward to feedback!

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Comment on Does a lie have to have intent to deceive? by reversedyske https://painintheenglish.com/case/4779/#comment-27148 reversedyske Thu, 19 Jan 2017 20:37:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4779/#comment-27148 I disagree with Dyske's answer.
In the first example, you are saying something that you know is not true.
In the second example, that is a subjective opinion. They can truly believe they have the best pizza, just like you hear people say they have the greatest wife or kids. It's a subjective opinion that they may truly believe in.
In the third example, that would be a lie because once again you are saying something that is not true even though it's hyperbole.
The way I under the definition of "lie" is that it wouldn't be a lie if I say something I BELIEVE to be true, but is factually wrong. If the police ask me to describe a suspect from memory I could truly believe I'm giving the correct description from memory and be factually wrong, but wasn't my INTENT to deceive the police.

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Comment on Salutations in letters by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5731/#comment-27146 Hairy Scot Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:27:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5731/#comment-27146 In email to someone familiar, I open with "Hi" and sign off with "Cheers" or "Slàinte mhath". Otherwise I use "Good day" and "Regards".
In letters it's normally "Dear ......" and "Yours sincerely".
I agree that "Yours truly" and "Yours faithfully" now seem to be considered passé.

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Comment on Is it acceptable to say “higher than” when you mean “as high as”? by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27145 Hairy Scot Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:18:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27145 How about, "The rent has doubled.", or "The rent is now twice what it was."
Both "two times higher" and "two times as high" sound like phrases used by primary school kids.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Alun Evans https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27144 Alun Evans Tue, 17 Jan 2017 15:57:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27144 Trust me, when you get to my age, mid 60s, you will start complaining when you hear words spoken which you have grown up with all your life, being given totally different meanings and you are supposed to calmly accept these new meanings without having a clue why they have been changed. If someone comes up to me and says hey as a greeting, then for me I am waiting for them to finish. Even when I just hear it in plays or films, it makes me feel very uncomfortable. I'm not writing here to say it's right or wrong just to make folk understand that it can be very unsettling for some of us.

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Comment on Team names — singular or plural by B123456789 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4394/#comment-27143 B123456789 Tue, 17 Jan 2017 05:24:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4394/#comment-27143 The team has access to multiple sources

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Comment on On Tomorrow by JBS https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27142 JBS Mon, 16 Jan 2017 14:22:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27142 This is an old world English term sometimes trapped in areas of Appalachia, like many other old German, Scottish, Irish and English phrases (or variations thereof). It's commonly used among religious African American folks in Georgia and Alabama from my experience. The reason so many comments have referenced NE Georgia, Kentucky, and North Carolina etc.. is the Appalachian connection.

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by Wenban5 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27141 Wenban5 Sun, 15 Jan 2017 16:25:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27141 An extension of solecism?

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Comment on Actress instead of Actor by charmaine https://painintheenglish.com/case/703/#comment-27140 charmaine Sun, 15 Jan 2017 11:11:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/703/#comment-27140 I have long found referring to both male and female thespians as "actors" extremely distasteful, as in PC gone amok. When I waited tables, I had no problem with the term "waitress." Then again, I have no problem with the term "comedienne" for a female comedian. The stewardess/steward thing which is now deemed offensive seems patently absurd to me, but well, "flight attendant" it is! However, reading all the comments with historic connotations does help me make a bit more sense of it all. Personally, I have no problem with the masculine and feminine forms of words/professions, and in fact I do buck against changing all of that, but appreciate the perspectives offered. I totally get that a female MD is not called a doctoress in English, but she would be called "la doctora" in Spanish, and a male "el doctor."

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by John Baxter https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27139 John Baxter Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:22:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27139 Usually a brand name or a play on words, used in advertising. Like the old pop brand, "Hi Klas" rather than "Hi Class" I want to say what that is called. Would an advertising agency know, I wonder? Or a college course in advertising maybe?

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Michael luna https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27138 Michael luna Wed, 11 Jan 2017 01:16:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27138 I'm Mexican native American from Los Angeles California and I use Ant not aunt but I have heard my cousins say aunt before. Personally I prefer ant.

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Comment on “advocate for” or just “advocate”? by John Eidsmoe https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27137 John Eidsmoe Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:41:15 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27137 In general, the noun/verb distinction is accurate, but not completely so.

If I were a lobbyist, I might say "I advocate lower taxes."

But if the Republican Party retained me (with or without pay) as an advocate for lower taxes, I could say "I am an advocate (noun) for the Republican Party" or "I advocate (verb) for the Republican Party."

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Felicity Leith-Ross https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27136 Felicity Leith-Ross Tue, 10 Jan 2017 04:42:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27136 A mouse is a mouse and mice are mice - whether electronic or furry !

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by Grammar Mammal https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27135 Grammar Mammal Mon, 9 Jan 2017 18:34:20 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27135 To report “there is an accident just prior to the Erindale Rd turn-off” is correct from the perspective of the listener, who judges distances in time as well as linear distance. A driver thinks in terms of duration between landmarks, and may be as likely to consider an exit 2 miles away as 2 minutes away.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Roger Burnell https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27134 Roger Burnell Mon, 9 Jan 2017 12:40:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27134 Sorry to correct Jun-Dai, however "anyways" is not an English word!

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Comment on “You have two choices” by GILL https://painintheenglish.com/case/5198/#comment-27133 GILL Sat, 7 Jan 2017 02:01:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5198/#comment-27133 This drives me bananas. "You have two choices." You can't have one choice. It's not a choice. You have a choice means you have two options. If there are three to choose from, you have three options. Doesn't matter who said it in history or in respectable places. I still roll my eyes when I hear it. Ah trivial... doesn't matter... I should get some sleep...

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by suze1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27132 suze1 Fri, 6 Jan 2017 12:25:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27132 The term for this is 'sensational spelling'
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensational_spelling

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Comment on obliged or obligated? by Rorritt https://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-27131 Rorritt Wed, 4 Jan 2017 14:10:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-27131 Obligated is simply clumsy grammar - obliged applies wherever both words might apply!

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Comment on anything vs. everything by heavenly- two https://painintheenglish.com/case/4408/#comment-27130 heavenly- two Wed, 4 Jan 2017 04:19:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4408/#comment-27130 why it is not correct to say, it doesn't necessary?

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