Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Sat, 1 Oct 2016 21:40:13 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on thus, therefore and hence are different by e274 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-26999 e274 Sat, 1 Oct 2016 15:33:33 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-26999 @healyjake
“thus” is an adverb.

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-26998 Brus Watters Sat, 1 Oct 2016 09:51:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-26998 First it was called a mouse because it looked like a mouse, then 'they' thought up a suitable acronym. Of course the plural, should it ever be needed, is "mice", for 'mouses' sounds plain silly. The same applies to goose-geese, and your man who says it is "not acceptable" seems, as it were, to be shooting from the hip: being authoritarian but quoting no authority and using terminology which has a whiff of political correctness about it in its dogmatism. Humourless, too. 'Gooses' is a verb, and renders uncomfortable its use in the context suggested. So I say the plural form of the noun is 'geese' as always.

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Jan Michael Sauer https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-26997 Jan Michael Sauer Sat, 1 Oct 2016 04:53:02 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-26997 The handle of a tailor's smoothing iron is a goose. The word geese is NOT acceptable as the plural. In this case the plural of goose is GOOSES. So, I vote for mouses !

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Comment on On Tomorrow by RedBikeGirl https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-26996 RedBikeGirl Thu, 29 Sep 2016 11:30:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-26996 I live is south Louisiana and I hear it more and more. It's driving me nuts.

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Comment on attorneys general vs. attorney generals by jdjay https://painintheenglish.com/case/4680/#comment-26995 jdjay Wed, 28 Sep 2016 13:04:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4680/#comment-26995 Isn't "General" a rank rather than an adjective. The AG is the top ranking government attorney and not some general purpose "JACK-OF-ALL-TRADES" . Are we really supposed to say Postmasters General, etc.?

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Richard Pelland https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26994 Richard Pelland Wed, 28 Sep 2016 09:48:01 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26994 It seems to me that the premise of this assertion is entirely false. The British do use plurals where North Americans tend to use singulars. Words such as family and staff are commonly construed as being plural in Britain. This is not a new phenomenon. I think the import part is to be consistent and to be attuned to one's audience.

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by Barry Raynes https://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26993 Barry Raynes Wed, 28 Sep 2016 05:46:27 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26993 It's a purely political song about the subjugation of Jamaica by the British. "Woman" is "Queen".

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by Jessica Roberts https://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26992 Jessica Roberts Tue, 27 Sep 2016 06:58:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26992 Hey Guys!!! I got mine from Ghost Hackers from USA. My blank ATM card can withdraw $5,000 daily i know its sounds too good to be true but i am sharing this info because i got this said blank ATM card after i was ripped off by two fake hackers from Nigeria. I finally got hold of this hackers from USA that delivered the card to me after i paid the purchasing fee for the card, now i have more than enough to spend for my Christmas also enough for me & my 2 kids. I'm really happy i met this ghost-hackers from USA because i met two people before this real dude from but they took my money not knowing that they were scams! Thanks to ghost-hackers from USA that sent the card through shipping agent and i got it within 3 days. Get one from them now by sending a mail to this email address: ghosthackers.blankatmcard.hk@gmail.com.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26991 Hairy Scot Tue, 27 Sep 2016 01:21:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26991 https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=956922017770971&set=a.713479185448590.1073741830.100003595466063&type=3

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Comment on and so... by JanetteV https://painintheenglish.com/case/4559/#comment-26990 JanetteV Mon, 26 Sep 2016 20:53:33 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4559/#comment-26990 I like to use 'and so' in certain forms. I would never use it in an academic paper but I would in poetry and some others as well. Correct or not, it is understood and I have accepted much less elegant words or terms under the premise that a living language changes

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Comment on Can every letter be used as a silent letter? by He https://painintheenglish.com/case/4441/#comment-26989 He Mon, 26 Sep 2016 18:45:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4441/#comment-26989 The letter o is silent in the name phoebe(feebee, not fobe)

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Comment on Can every letter be used as a silent letter? by Irregular https://painintheenglish.com/case/4441/#comment-26988 Irregular Mon, 26 Sep 2016 18:43:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4441/#comment-26988 What about vowels? I have a list:

Silent A:In "ea" words when it makes the short or long e sound:Leaf, head, bread, stealth, read, knead

Silent O:In "ou" words where it's pronounced like a short or long u:Couple, you, cousin, rough, coupon

Silent U:Build

Does anyone have any more? I can't think of any.

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Comment on eat vs. have breakfast by Brandley https://painintheenglish.com/case/352/#comment-26987 Brandley Mon, 26 Sep 2016 01:41:49 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/352/#comment-26987 To " have " breakfast is to " eat " and "drink" something.
To " eat" breakfast is to only eat something.
Thus, have is more convenient and makes more sense to use, especially when you're teaching ESL students.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26986 Hairy Scot Sun, 25 Sep 2016 23:16:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26986 @jtu
I rest my case.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26985 jayles the unwoven Sun, 25 Sep 2016 22:38:36 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26985 @HS I don't recall being taught anything about collective nouns plus singular verbs at school; perhaps it was taught and I was so busy daydreaming about our French conversation mistress at the time and worrying about my sinful thoughts that I missed it. Presumably your syllabus was different or you were more attentive.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26984 Hairy Scot Sun, 25 Sep 2016 19:53:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26984 @jtu
I just have one more question:
Do you, and those who share your thoughts on issues like this, believe that those of us who attended schools and universities prior to 1965 should forget all that we learned about the English language in that time and adopt the various fads and errors that have become commonplace since then?

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26983 Hairy Scot Sun, 25 Sep 2016 18:02:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26983 @jtu
That is a typical descriptivist cop out.
Your use of "different to" illustrates that you are firmly in the camp of those who just like to be different for the sake of being different and who have absolutely no respect for the language.
No doubt you will soon be advocating the use of "should of" as a correct alternative to "should have" and that perpendicular just means at right angles with no regard to plane.
How do you stand on mixing up past tense and past participle?

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26982 jayles the unwoven Sun, 25 Sep 2016 15:00:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26982 Whether it is "correct" or not would hinge upon the criteria used. However if "people who are apparently reasonably well educated" persistently and knowingly use words such as "family" with a plural verb, despite "what has been taught for decades in schools in the UK and elsewhere", there must be a good reason, they must feel comfortable doing so, and editors do not automatically edit such constructions out. If you feel uncomfortable with this, then your eduction or background or thinking must be different to theirs.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26981 Hairy Scot Sun, 25 Sep 2016 07:24:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26981 @jtu
"@HS It's not just Jane Austen:
http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=%22the+family+..."

Does that makes it correct?

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26980 jayles the unwoven Sun, 25 Sep 2016 05:35:37 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26980 @HS It's not just Jane Austen:
http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=%22the+family+are%22+1784&btnG=Search&lr=lang_en&gbv=1&tbs=lr%3Alang_1en&tbm=bks

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26979 Hairy Scot Sun, 25 Sep 2016 02:34:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26979 @jtu
Are you saying that Jane Austen could not have been wrong?

You know, it really surprises me that people who are apparently reasonably well educated seek to gainsay what has been taught for decades in schools in the UK and elsewhere.
It's a bit like the old lady watching troops marching past and exclaiming, "They're all out of step bar our Willie".

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26978 jayles the unwoven Sun, 25 Sep 2016 02:05:14 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26978 @HS You have not actually explained Jane Austen's use of 'family' - a "collective" noun - with a plural verb, which seems contrary to your opening post: 'Despite arguments to the contrary, "family" is a collective noun, and I don't care how many family members there might be, it therefore gets a singular verb.'

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26977 Hairy Scot Sun, 25 Sep 2016 00:27:43 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26977 @jtu
In answer to your two previous posts.
1.
Education
2.
Family is and always will be a collective noun.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26976 jayles the unwoven Sat, 24 Sep 2016 23:55:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26976 I would also like your analysis of whether "family" is a collective or plural noun in the following extract taken from Pride & Prejudice, Chapter VI of Volume II (Chap. 29):
"...and it was but the other day that I recommended another young person, who was merely accidentally mentioned to me, and the family are quite delighted with her."

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26975 jayles the unwoven Sat, 24 Sep 2016 23:10:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26975 @HS So how can we tell that "cattle" is plural but "herd" is a "collective" noun?

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26974 Hairy Scot Sat, 24 Sep 2016 20:59:48 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26974 @jayles the unwoven

There are nouns which are recognised as having only a plural form and as such are not relevant to a discussion on collective nouns.
These include police, cattle, oats, tweezers, pants, remains.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26973 jayles the unwoven Fri, 23 Sep 2016 17:03:05 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26973 @HS Could you please complete the following:
a) Quick! The police ___ coming!
b) The cattle ___ lowing, the baby awakes.

Please also explain how, in your world, we can tell which nouns are "collective" and which are not.

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Comment on “It is I” vs. “It is me” by Daryl Fisk https://painintheenglish.com/case/642/#comment-26972 Daryl Fisk Fri, 23 Sep 2016 10:12:01 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/642/#comment-26972 "It is I," and "It am I," are both stiff for the same reason; they are illiterate, for both attempt to mix first and third person pronouns and "to be" verbs.

Another way to answer the question, only this time with the word "me," would be with an appropriate preposition in front of it. For example, one could say, "This is the voice of me." Or if someone asked whose picture this is, one could answer, "It is an image of me."

One could drop the use of pronouns altogether and say, "It was my knocking you heard. May I come in?" Clearly, all the person on the other side of the door just needs to hear is the knocker's voice to know who it is.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26971 Hairy Scot Thu, 22 Sep 2016 19:29:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26971 My apologies for the typo in my previous post.
I should of course have used plurality instead of pluralism.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by YASUKO SCHWARZ https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26970 YASUKO SCHWARZ Thu, 22 Sep 2016 18:06:07 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26970 Just what I was looking for. I think it could also be useful for everyone to know how and where to merge documents online. BTW, if anyone needs to merge PDF/PNG files online, I found a service here altomerge.

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Comment on “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/4977/#comment-26969 Hairy Scot Thu, 22 Sep 2016 00:17:07 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4977/#comment-26969 @JonRich
With you 100% on this one.
However, I've no doubt the usual naysayers will present some spurious contrary arguments.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26968 Hairy Scot Thu, 22 Sep 2016 00:14:09 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-26968 This keeps popping up, and there are those who will insist on using a plural verb for certain collective nouns.
IMHO a collective noun gets a singular verb. End of story.
Despite arguments to the contrary, "family" is a collective noun, and I don't care how many family members there might be, it therefore gets a singular verb.
Similarly team, government, IRS, etc etc are all collectives and get singular verbs.
No doubt Warsaw Will and Jayles will now climb in with contrary positions based on some spurious concept of pluralism.

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Comment on Walking Heavens by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5700/#comment-26967 Hairy Scot Thu, 22 Sep 2016 00:07:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5700/#comment-26967 I'd go with "Walking Heaven’s woods with her daddy."
I base that on my reading it as Heaven being singular and the woods being part of Heaven.

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Comment on “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English by JonRich https://painintheenglish.com/case/4977/#comment-26966 JonRich Wed, 21 Sep 2016 11:18:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4977/#comment-26966 for god sake its not that complex

Take me to your leader

bring your leader to me

there is a context to "bring" and "take" a direction of movement

and US films and TV are getting it wrong

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Comment on Can every letter be used as a silent letter? by Lucy https://painintheenglish.com/case/4441/#comment-26965 Lucy Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:55:37 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4441/#comment-26965 Maybe "pleasure" for the letter A.

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Comment on “It is I” vs. “It is me” by Daryl Fisk https://painintheenglish.com/case/642/#comment-26964 Daryl Fisk Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:38:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/642/#comment-26964 Neither is right. "It is ..." is said in the third person, and I, being in the first person, needs to be used with "...am...."

So, the correct way to answer the question, "Who is it?" is to say, "I am who it is." This uses the second pronoun "who" to allow the third person to be used in answer.

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Comment on Assist in or assist with by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/434/#comment-26963 jayles the unwoven Mon, 19 Sep 2016 17:05:30 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/434/#comment-26963 Suggestions:

"He assisted his boss with planning the project launch" OR
"He assisted his boss in planning the project launch"

drafting would be used for engineering drawings, a book or report, or a timetable or schedule. Planning is more general.

"That partner assisted the company with additional funds to finance the mall construction"
OR ...to finance the construction of the mall.

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Comment on Assist in or assist with by Gerard Cat https://painintheenglish.com/case/434/#comment-26962 Gerard Cat Mon, 19 Sep 2016 12:28:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/434/#comment-26962 Would it be correct a sentence combining both i.e.: "He assisted his boss with the planning drafting in the project launching"?
or "That partner assisted the company with additional funds in the mall construction financing"?

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Comment on people like she/he are... by G.G https://painintheenglish.com/case/5677/#comment-26961 G.G Mon, 19 Sep 2016 10:42:18 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5677/#comment-26961 Seems pretty straight forward the writer made a mistake, it happens a lot with these helpful machines called computers which autocorrect, and if you type fast you could get one or two into your document. "Now recruiters like HER are increasingly looking..."
In your own Query the 'i' should be capitalized, "Query: Is the use of the word SHE correct?! there is also no need for the '!' nor is it accurate. The capitalization is a new phenomenon started since the internet became the medium of choice for communication, in the past it would be in quotation marks and NOT capitalized, as capitalization indicates SCREAMING AT SOMEONE in this forums, or emails. Perhaps underlining the word is an option if your concern is a possible confusion at reading time?

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by G.G https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26960 G.G Mon, 19 Sep 2016 10:29:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26960 Even if some words are assimilated into english, they normally should retain the original accents, otherwise how (except in by context) would anyone know which is which? Adding the slant also helps a lot by indicating the last 'e' should be pronounced... For example, "I should resume writing my resumé"? The analogy with cafe and café doesn't hold, because in that case we are not trying to distinguish between 'coffee' and 'cafe' or 'café'?

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Comment on Is the following sentence using the word “yet” correctly? by Jean Watson https://painintheenglish.com/case/5579/#comment-26959 Jean Watson Mon, 19 Sep 2016 08:27:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5579/#comment-26959 I remember this rule fom school: we use yet in a negative or interrogative clause with meaning that something hasn't been done up to the present time.
According to cambridge dictionary it can be used to indicate action from now and for a particular period of time in the future, like in these examples:
She won't be back for a long time yet.
Our holiday isn't for weeks yet.
If you need more information on this matter visit dictionary.cambridge.org
But i'll suggest using online grammar checkers to find out whether it's right or not: http://www.bestgrammarsoftware.com/

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Peter X https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26958 Peter X Sun, 18 Sep 2016 23:15:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26958 You article is rubbish. No-one with any intelligence will use eg or e.g
Don't ask me to proof-read my document anfd then give a "genius" comment

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Comment on Someone else’s by Ida https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26957 Ida Sat, 17 Sep 2016 16:26:18 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26957 Ok, if we still can't figure out the official rule after more than seven years of the world's greatest Ph.D. Grammar Tyrants arguing, I'm just going to assume the rule doesn't matter enough to really care. I'll just say "someone else's" and "passersby." Good enough. English is technically a second language for me anyway, so I have an excuse. Haha, just kidding... I actually speak English better than my first language now (Nynorsk).

Laurie, your post literally made me laugh out loud. I won't understand the world around me, and I won't be able to understand what I'm reading unless I've learned perfect English? Ummm, no, but thanks for the laugh! My skills in English were only so-so until my early 20s, but I understood my world and books quite well long before then, thank you! I am not trying to pretend my grammar is commendable, so I'm allowed to make mistakes, but you really should proofread what you write if you're going to be that pretentious and patronizing. (You made several errors.) Also, if language did not evolve, we would still be talking like Shakespeare. But hey, as long as you have that terrific view from the top of you high horse, what do you care?

Brockaway, eaglesight, Warsaw, mike, cosmic, and others brought up some very interesting points, and I do appreciate all of your thoughts. Thank you. But a few of you really need to relax :)

English is fun! (shoot me)

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Comment on percentages by LKBski https://painintheenglish.com/case/461/#comment-26954 LKBski Fri, 16 Sep 2016 13:44:43 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/461/#comment-26954 In legal we use 66-2/3% all the time in our finance contracts. So as much as it "sounds really stupid" to say it, we have to still know how to type it out. I also don't appreciate your pop-up asking to proofread my document then bullying me when I said no because it is a confidential document.
Thanks for the help...

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Comment on “study of” vs. “study on” by vc@adtu.in https://painintheenglish.com/case/4134/#comment-26953 vc@adtu.in Wed, 14 Sep 2016 04:12:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4134/#comment-26953 Studies on a specific topic is correct in research say "Studies on water pollution of Jamuna river" is correct. Study of Physics is very interesting . Both are correct in their respective context. They are usually contextual as shown above examples.
Professor Ramesh C. Deka
AdtU , Assam

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Comment on Pronouncing “str” like “shtr” as in “shtrong” “shtrange” by jean Frank https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-26952 jean Frank Mon, 12 Sep 2016 14:00:38 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-26952 I have noticed 3 terrible things from public figures. One from a long time ago is that ten became "tin," along with "incintive," "sinator," etc. More recent is the response to an interviewer asking "How did that happen?" or "What was decided?" Rather than "Well, first we..." it seems that everyone now says "So, we..." as if "How bad was the earthquake?" doesn't deserve an exclamation! but a "So, our seismologists...." The third item is very shtrange. The shtrength of life of shtatements by shtentorious public figures who live on shtandard shtreets of our shtates is ashtounding. No wonder shtudents are shtruggling with shtrict rules of articulation.

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Comment on Team names — singular or plural by Grammar Nirvana https://painintheenglish.com/case/4394/#comment-26951 Grammar Nirvana Sun, 11 Sep 2016 12:33:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4394/#comment-26951 There is English and there is English spoken incorrectly!

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Cedric https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26950 Cedric Sun, 11 Sep 2016 03:38:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26950 I really don't like the sound of 'texted', sounds so unwieldy.
I appreciate the correct usage if a noun is turned into a verb, yet........

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by DrCrusher https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26949 DrCrusher Sun, 11 Sep 2016 03:37:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26949 I really don't like the sound of 'texted', sounds so unwieldy.
I appreciate the correct usage if a noun is turned into a verb, yet........

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Comment on Couldn’t Care Less by Random Cody https://painintheenglish.com/case/60/#comment-26948 Random Cody Sat, 10 Sep 2016 20:36:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/60/#comment-26948 No that's not true. It depends on the individuals interpretation of the 2 differing phrases.

For example, if you said...."I could not care"... then this means that you absolutely without a doubt 100% do not care about something.

For some people this is the most efficient and relevant way of communicating to someone else that they do not care. So why would you add the word "less" at the end of the sentence "I could not care" making it "I could not care less"? For some people this doesn't make sense and to others it does. To some people "care" and "care less" are total opposites in their idiomatic ways of rhetoric.

To some people, saying "I could not care less" literally means "I could not not care". It means this to some people because some people look at the words care and less when combined as "care less" as a whole phrase even though they are two separate words for obvious reasons. To some people "care less" means the same as "no care" because it is an idiom. Hopefully I explained it where it makes sense and if it doesn't that probably means that some people prefer a different color than others or don't see things in the same light. It's a very subjective and expressive subject that we are talking about here.

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