Comments for Pain in the English http://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Thu, 5 May 2016 19:06:55 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by https://www.facebook.com/TiRodTactical http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26790 https://www.facebook.com/TiRodTactical Thu, 5 May 2016 11:01:18 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26790 Yes,....when I opened my P.O. Box about two years ago (but since closed),....the Postal Worker gave me BOTH the usual P.O.Box Full Address AND an acceptable UPS / FedEx, or other Private Carrier Delivery Address that ALLOWS delivery to your P.O. Box in a round about way. The Mailing address reflects the physical address of the Post Office Branch, with the P.O. Box listed to the side. Technically the Private carrier IS delivering to a physical street address, and the Post Office is sort of forwarding it to your box. haha

Apparantly, the Post Office Head Honchos have decided "Practicality" trumps Federal Statutes. :-)

Joe T

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Comment on As wet as ? by ines http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26789 ines Thu, 5 May 2016 08:49:25 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26789 as wet as a fish

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Comment on who vs. whom by Gretchen Davis http://painintheenglish.com/case/5018/#comment-26788 Gretchen Davis Wed, 4 May 2016 11:58:55 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5018/#comment-26788 Which is correct:

Who does he look like?
Whom does he look like?

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by trinity http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26787 trinity Wed, 4 May 2016 09:20:27 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26787 it doesent work

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Dames http://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26786 Dames Wed, 4 May 2016 08:39:25 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26786 I really love this site, and the design.

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Comment on couple vs couple of by Russell Davis http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26785 Russell Davis Wed, 4 May 2016 08:04:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26785 "A couple of x" is definitely correct; omitting "of" is just one more of countless examples of our "progressively" more illiterate society where what once would have been red lined in grade school is now sadly found in the NY Times, once our nation's leading newspaper, now it's leading laughingstock.

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Comment on obliged or obligated? by Vitaly Tomilov http://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-26784 Vitaly Tomilov Wed, 4 May 2016 04:36:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-26784 Obliged refers to something one should do, or even pleased to do. Obligated refers to something one is expected or supposed to do.

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Comment on hanged vs. hung by Charles Russell http://painintheenglish.com/case/503/#comment-26783 Charles Russell Mon, 2 May 2016 21:39:50 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/503/#comment-26783 I'm an antiquarian. I want my careful (though defective, of course) education to matter. Should my position have any legitimacy? I think it has always been a strong motivation for those who resist linguistic change; and sloppiness has always been a pressing reason for it.

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by Doraemon http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26782 Doraemon Mon, 2 May 2016 11:05:50 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26782 I thought it mean if a boy don't involve themself with girl , they won't ever get hurt and you know won't never cry .

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Comment on “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve” by Elie http://painintheenglish.com/case/4715/#comment-26781 Elie Mon, 2 May 2016 07:04:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4715/#comment-26781 People use it a lot it hurts!
a sarcastic example would be by singing:
" Would OF " the red nosed reindeer

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Comment on How many “ands” in a row by thedragon9059 http://painintheenglish.com/case/492/#comment-26780 thedragon9059 Sat, 30 Apr 2016 00:59:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/492/#comment-26780 Is it just me, or is the spacing between 'Pig' and 'and' and 'and' and 'And' and 'And' and 'and' and 'and' and 'And' and 'And' and 'and' and 'and' and 'Whistle' just a little bit off...?

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Comment on Proper usage of “as such” by ggh http://painintheenglish.com/case/5591/#comment-26779 ggh Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:45:33 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5591/#comment-26779 Admin, if not okay please remove!

Our facebook group “selfless” is spending this month spreading awareness on prostate cancer & research with a custom t-shirt design. Purchase proceeds will go to cancer.org, as listed on the shirt and shirt design.

www.teespring.com/prostate-cancer-research

Thanks

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Comment on Is the following sentence using the word “yet” correctly? by aresearch http://painintheenglish.com/case/5579/#comment-26778 aresearch Fri, 29 Apr 2016 11:09:59 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5579/#comment-26778 Can truly relate and retain this outstanding post. Very well written. http://www.availresearchhelp.com

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Comment on History of “-ish” by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26777 Hairy Scot Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:06:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26777 @Philip
Never seen or heard "ish" used in the manner you describe.
In my experience it's more commonly used to mean "around" or "about", as in "What time will you arrive?" "12ish"

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Comment on History of “-ish” by Philip http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26775 Philip Mon, 25 Apr 2016 22:57:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26775 Yes. Sorry for the confusion.
What I mean by "ish" is the "ish" I saw on a note fastened to a local store's locked entrance door that claimed they would return in fifteen"ish" minutes to reopen. I have also experienced the statement made, "That's cool'ish'". When I asked someone where something that I was looking for was I received the answer, "it's around'ish'". I understand its meaning but why the need for it? Is it laziness? Has it become so pop culture that now it is in common use in our languages? Do we fear committing to the very statements we make? "Ish" to me implies a lack of confidence. Call me old fashioned, but when a store owner used to claim they would return in fifteen minutes they, more often than not, would. But a store owner claiming to return in fifteen'ish' minutes means they could either return in fifteen, twenty, thirty or sixty minutes. There seems to be no accountability in "ish".

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Comment on History of “-ish” by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26774 jayles the unwoven Mon, 25 Apr 2016 20:12:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26774 Just to be clear: we are not discussing the "-ish" ending of words like abolish, punish, which comes from French.
"-ish" in the sense of "somewhat" is recorded in the OED as far back as 1894/1916
The alternative is to use the French version: "-esque" .
"Ish" has become a new standalone word in British English, meaning somewhat.

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Comment on Why do people feel it necessary to add “of” to some phrases? by Philip http://painintheenglish.com/case/5611/#comment-26773 Philip Mon, 25 Apr 2016 16:10:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5611/#comment-26773 I will be honest and say that I have no academic background in the use of words, grammar or punctuation, that is aside from a high school diploma that I barely acquired in my youth. In fact, in almost everything that I have typed, am typing and will type, it will be quite understandable if one was to find a multiple amount of errors. I have probably proven this within the few sentences that I have written here. However, this does not stop me from trying, nor does it stop me from learning. I love to learn about words, their history and their origins. Before I research, when I come across a word that I do not know I first guess at it's story and then search it out. So allow me to try that here with the word 'of'

Now I could be completely wrong or I could be on to something. When I think of 'of', I think of it in relation to a subject or topic. When we say "How bad of a decision" the of refers to the particular decision. If we were to say "How bad a decision" there is more ambiguity as to what decision is being referenced. "How bad a decision?" could be any decision, whereas "How bad of a decision?" is more specific to the situation at hand. "A decision" is more abstract and free. "'Of' a decision" is a little more concrete and belonging to. Call me crazy or just plain wrong, but hey I got to play in the world of words for but a few moments.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by jayles the unknighted http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26772 jayles the unknighted Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:24:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26772 Someone asked me how to respond to a text message (from a prospective employer) which began "Hey John" .
My usual advice is use whatever they do - use "Dear" if they do, and "Hi" if they do - but, hey, "Hey" sounded just too informal, and "Dear" too formal, so the solution was "Hi " + first name.
"Hey" is NOT the same as 'Hello' or 'Hi'

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Philip http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26771 Philip Mon, 25 Apr 2016 10:37:02 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26771 I wonder if it does not stem even further back to ancient Hebrew or ancient Semitic language. From my understanding the letter "hey" represents the divine breath or revelation. So "hey" would be a revealing of oneself, in this case God, to that of others via divine breath. We are aware of the others presence when we see them move(like breathing) and communicate, but we say they are not with us when they cease to do so (i.e. death). So when we express "hey" we are actually calling peoples attention to the fact that we are present and breathing, we are indeed alive. It is also a recognition to the other that we are aware of them also. It is a very old custom of greeting that brings attention to one another, that makes aware that each breathes and that each is acknowledged. It is really a relational word, that has perhaps taken on, unfairly, negative meanings.

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Laura Evans http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26770 Laura Evans Mon, 25 Apr 2016 09:06:32 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26770 how do I type out or write 1 and 42 hundredths percent

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Comment on Irregardless? by dj-emir http://painintheenglish.com/case/238/#comment-26769 dj-emir Thu, 21 Apr 2016 05:38:07 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/238/#comment-26769 Well regardless of how you feel about this word, it is a word created in error and used in error. It has been erroneously used by several famous authors of the past and present at the chagrin of their contemporaries. Current dictionaries have begun listing the "word" as a non standard word, and apparently many people do not understand what Non Standard means and take that to mean it IS a word. It is a word as in it is in common use. But common misuse does not make it a VALID word when what you actually mean already has a word associated with it. I once corrected a co worker and then my girlfriend about the "word" Irregardless stating that it is not actually a word. A second co worker defended my position immediately with he's correct. I then defined it quickly in an explanation that regardless was already having no regard for something so Irregardless would be "having no regard for having no regard or rather just having regard for something, which obviously is not the meaning she had originally intended. I said the word you would use would be regardless, as in not having any regard for something. Since the other coworkers corroborated my reasoning the dictionary was not sought after that day. Fast forward just a few months later and it was my girlfriend (now my wife) that ended up spouting the word irregardless to which the challenge was issued when I said that it wasn't an actual word. I sort of lost and won the bet at the same time since the "word" was actually in the dictionary but it's definition was : Though in widespread use, this word should be avoided in favor of Regardless. (See Regardless) I never had a problem with knowing this was a false word since I always think of words in a scientific way, that is I think to myself what is the possible root of the word and what is the possible meaning they are trying to convey, does this new word convey what they think it conveys? The only time I use IRREGARDLESS is when I make fun of that particular argument and use it as a means to remind her not to always argue things she's not completely certain of lest we look things up again because 8 out of 10 times I win these "Lets look it up" arguments :) - www.djemir.com

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by emmanuel http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26768 emmanuel Thu, 21 Apr 2016 02:12:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26768 It means "Please don't cry, my love".
When I'm away looking for a living in the post WW2 society of Jamaica, don't shed a tear.
For everything's gonna be alright, and we'll eat cornmeal porridge together later this night. Trust me.

This song is about love, and how a man reassure his spouse ... it's never about breaking up, it's never about abusing of women

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Comment on As wet as ? by YAY http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26767 YAY Wed, 20 Apr 2016 20:53:56 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26767 As wet as a marathon dog!

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by George Stephen http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26766 George Stephen Wed, 20 Apr 2016 09:48:37 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26766 single: curriculum vitae
plural: curricula vitarum

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Braindabrian http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26765 Braindabrian Mon, 18 Apr 2016 20:33:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26765 Pleaded is correct grammar, pled is what sounds more pleasing to the ear because it's been used for so long, mainly by American journalist. But in the past few years we've found it being replaced with pleaded, as the main authorities on grammar say it's the correct choice.

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Comment on Signage by Eric Tuten http://painintheenglish.com/case/4509/#comment-26764 Eric Tuten Mon, 18 Apr 2016 10:03:17 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4509/#comment-26764 Ugh! In my mind, "signage" is another abominable creation of the business, or perhaps military, culture--along with "utilize" (gag!) and the use of "grow" as a transitive (e.g., "We need to grow our business by at least 10% or we're in trouble.").

These hideous words are akin to using "impact" as a verb: "He impacted me greatly." (Please don't make me heave my breakfast!). Sadly, I alone won't succeed in stopping the world from using impact in this way, but I am not going to slip into such mediocrity myself. I dread the day--and it will come!--when "impact" used as a verb will become "impactize." Again, ugh!

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26763 Hairy Scot Sun, 17 Apr 2016 17:10:27 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26763 @Sombody123

Yep, just like speed limits and taxes.

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Sombody123 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26762 Sombody123 Fri, 15 Apr 2016 00:51:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26762 Well I just wanted to say that Proper Grammar is a lie there is no such thing, and we shouldn't conform to it we should get rid of it altogether.

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Comment on “This Wednesday” vs. “Next Wednesday” by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-26761 jayles the unwoven Wed, 13 Apr 2016 21:28:26 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-26761 @Wheelye With so much international emailing, it is just a matter of avoiding ambiguity. In the same way it is better to avoid ambiguous date formats such as 03/04/2016 and always to spell out the month: March 4, 2016 or 4th March 2016. Similarly if one simply says "this Wednesday" or "Wednesday week" or in an email adds the day as "Wed 12th", then all is clear.

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Comment on “This Wednesday” vs. “Next Wednesday” by Wheelye http://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-26760 Wheelye Wed, 13 Apr 2016 19:44:22 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-26760 USA, UK, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, Canada, etc… Why not take an advanced English grammar teacher from each of those countries, lock them up in a room, and tell them the only way to unlock that door is to agree on this topic?

Obviously, as what's correct differs vastly between these countries, such a move should hopefully result in proper documentation outlining not only what's correct in each country, but also details how the grammar on this differs between the countries.

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Comment on The following is... vs. Following is... by -dja http://painintheenglish.com/case/4379/#comment-26759 -dja Wed, 13 Apr 2016 14:30:04 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4379/#comment-26759 Came across your site while looking for grammer girl...

Great URL :)

Will pass it along ...

Regards -dja

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Comment on Why do people feel it necessary to add “of” to some phrases? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5611/#comment-26758 jayles the unwoven Tue, 12 Apr 2016 14:17:55 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5611/#comment-26758 @HS there is some discussion on this topic here:

http://www.antimoon.com/forum/t11916.htm

the last two comments there attempt to distinguish the meaning of "not much choice" from "not much of a choice".

Certainly both phrases with or without "of" are in use.
If one searches the web for "that big of a deal" and similar phrases, their usage seems to have taken off in print since the 1980s, seemingly on both sides of the Atlantic. Whether this is because the "of" was edited out prior to that is not clear.

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Comment on Word in question: Conversate by E http://painintheenglish.com/case/4304/#comment-26755 E Tue, 12 Apr 2016 10:33:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4304/#comment-26755 Even now, the word "conversate" is still controversial. It's not quite accepted by all but is tolerated. If I remember correctly, someone brought up an example using orientation and orient. If I'm not mistaken, "orient" is used as a depiction of Asian decent. That being said, orient should be a well respected word under certain pretences. I personally feel that the word "conversate" is more towards a slang term.

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by Emilio torres http://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-26754 Emilio torres Mon, 11 Apr 2016 22:01:28 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-26754 If i want to upload a photo with my girlfriend what should i use she❤️ Or her❤️?

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26753 jayles the unwoven Sun, 10 Apr 2016 11:42:33 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26753 @Joan I would suggest:
thirty-two and thirty-two-hundredths percent
or
thirty-two and thirty-two hundredths percent

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by Wm Stanley http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26752 Wm Stanley Fri, 8 Apr 2016 23:16:35 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26752 I no longer accept delivery of mail at my home. The Banking institutions insist on my physical address, where I sleep at night. I find this to be a gross invasion of privacy and when I have given out the home address, despite my admonition not to send mail, I have had to suffer the unpleasant clutter of spam and unsolicited material that is too bulky for the box and is either stolen or blown down the street despite federal regulation against such tampering.
The U.S.P.S. even promotes their facility as "your other address".
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Foreign Nationals reference the Patriot Act as their justification for demanding the address where I sleep. They are unable to send my a copy of the regulation,but to interpret as a priest what they alone understand. However, carriers such as UPS & FedEx do deliver to the Post Office Building, then the well-paid federal workers secure that and other postings for me.

This policy has worked very well for me since 1980.

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Comment on Motives vs. Motivation by raul kuri http://painintheenglish.com/case/35/#comment-26751 raul kuri Fri, 8 Apr 2016 19:53:56 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/35/#comment-26751 not with god government just statistics of those who pound the pavement

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Comment on Comma in long date format by Johnic Boom http://painintheenglish.com/case/5571/#comment-26750 Johnic Boom Fri, 8 Apr 2016 17:09:00 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5571/#comment-26750 My understanding is that the comma belongs after the 16.

Also, while it may be pronounced "sixteenth", you never write the "th" (or "st", "nd", etc.).

So, it should be:
January 16, 2016

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Joan http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26749 Joan Fri, 8 Apr 2016 13:53:09 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26749 How do I write out 32.32%?

Thanks.

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Comment on Possessive with acromyms ending in S by Tammi Nervig http://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-26748 Tammi Nervig Fri, 8 Apr 2016 12:04:40 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-26748 So here is my question. We are using acronyms that end is "s" How do you show them as many?

ex: Welding Procedure Specification (WPS)
Do you write WPSs, leave at WPS (can be singular or multiple), or WPS' ?

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Comment on Why ‘an’ in front of an ‘h’-word? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/330/#comment-26747 jayles the unwoven Fri, 8 Apr 2016 03:59:29 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/330/#comment-26747 @tori I think you will find "an HTML" is more common if you search the internet.
In some schools, especially in Northern Ireland, 'H' is pronounced "haitch", so some people write "a HTML".

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Comment on Why ‘an’ in front of an ‘h’-word? by Tori Jade http://painintheenglish.com/case/330/#comment-26746 Tori Jade Thu, 7 Apr 2016 20:34:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/330/#comment-26746 Do I put an 'a' or an 'an' in front of HDMI? Because in front of HDMI the H is not silent but it has the 'a' sound in it, but no a

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Smashley http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26745 Smashley Thu, 7 Apr 2016 17:52:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26745 The word is just TEXT! You didn't cutted your hair or letted someone in the door....It's just TEXT past, present and future...TEXT!!!!

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by Zoe http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-26740 Zoe Wed, 6 Apr 2016 16:05:58 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-26740 I'm from England, and 'me either sounds odd to me. Nobody says it. I had to look it up, though, because I noticed someone online say 'either', then I questioned my way.
Maybe I should have just said 'nor did I... or I didn't either, because I know those are correct :-)

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Nigel Appleby http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26739 Nigel Appleby Wed, 6 Apr 2016 11:15:34 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26739 This is a complete hypercorrection. English grammar is NOT comparable to Latin grammar, although it is somewhat comparable to French (where, surprise surprise, the rule is "C'est moi" -- "It's me.")

To put it more technically, the subject complement doesn't fall into the "nominative case", which in English exists only vestigially in singular subjects, but rather the "disjunctive". The disjunctive is used for emphasis or when, for whatever reason, the subject is not the explicit actor of the verb (which in this case is "This is...").

Spoken English similarly mirrors standard French with the use of disjunctive pronouns in compound subjects, such as the commonly heard "Me and him are going to the shops". In this case, disjunctive pronouns are again preferred because the explicit verb-subject agreement has been broken (you cannot say "he are going" -- what you are actually saying is "Me and him, (we) are going...").

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Comment on Use of “Massive” by paul1 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4280/#comment-26738 paul1 Tue, 5 Apr 2016 20:13:41 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4280/#comment-26738 Something is massive if it possesses mass. Many things possess mass -- even a litre of air is massive. But of course, there are many things that do not possess mass -- ideas, sounds, and time are not massive.

In the news today, there are stories about a massive recession, a massive data leak, a massive spending bill, a massive fire, and a massive year for Taekwondo stars. None of these things possess mass. There is also a story about a massive 15-foot alligator. Surely the alligator has mass, but I believe they mean "big".

I also see the headline "Microsoft Makes Five Massive Windows 10 Changes". Changes can be many things -- significant or insignificant, laudable or despicable, for instance -- but they can't be massive. Perhaps the headline should be "Microsoft Makes Five Significant, Laudable Windows 10 Changes".

I see a headline about a "massive gold heist". Surely someone will comment that gold has mass. But a gold heist does not. A heist is a robbery, burglary, or holdup. These things do not possess mass.

And then there are the advertisements. A massive freebie bundle of software. A massive year-end sale of nail polish. A massive celebration. A massive year of home building.

And the political statements. Massive budget cuts. Massive contracts. A massive year of ups and downs.

It's silly. Budget cuts can be severe; why not say "severe"? A spending bill can be huge; why not say "huge"? A fire can be devastating; why not say "devastating" -- or better still, "four-alarm" or "five-alarm", if specifics are available?

Using the word "massive" suggests that the writer understands something about the object being described that the rest of us don't know: some aspect of the object that possesses mass. Perhaps an explosion is "massive" because it moves a massive quantity of air and debris.

But an explosion is not massive. An explosion is a violent expansion that transmits energy outward as a shock wave. It may be enormous. It may be destructive. It may be contained or uncontained. But it's not massive, and a writer conveys no useful information -- or impression of secret knowledge -- to say that it is.

There will always be buzzwords -- words that seem for a few years to mean more than they do. I have some hopes that "literally" and "awesome" are dying their natural deaths. But "massive" has crept into popular use among newspeople and professional writers -- not just among politicians, advertisers, and adolescents. I fear that they will inflict the word on us for many years before they realize how silly it sounds.

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Comment on Complete sentence in parentheses by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5609/#comment-26737 jayles the unwoven Tue, 5 Apr 2016 17:25:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5609/#comment-26737 "A sentence that occurs within brackets in the course of another sentence does not generally have its first word capitalized just because it starts a sentence. The enclosed sentence may have a question mark or exclamation mark added, but not a period."
Eg
Alexander then conquered (who would have believed it?) most of the known world.

Parentheses are somewhat "jarring to the reader and best avoided where feasible" - as per West Michigan University

I would remove the parentheses from your alternative stand-alone sentence

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Comment on Complete sentence in parentheses by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5609/#comment-26736 jayles the unwoven Tue, 5 Apr 2016 17:22:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5609/#comment-26736 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style#Brackets_and_parentheses

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Comment on why does english have capital letters? by Yishai http://painintheenglish.com/case/4334/#comment-26735 Yishai Sun, 3 Apr 2016 02:18:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4334/#comment-26735 I think that capital letters are helpful for English reading but makes it harder to learn.

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Kiki http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26734 Kiki Sat, 2 Apr 2016 18:19:28 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26734 The verb "plead" has 2 meanings. One meaning is similar to "beg;" She pleaded for leniency, or I pleaded to the principal on my child's behalf. This verb needs an object.

The secondary (less common, legal) meaning is "to make a statement about the facts" Ex: He pled not guilty. The officer pled his ignorance on the matter. Or the fixed expression "He pled the fifth." This is the only sense where "entered a plea of" could be synonymous. This is a stative verb.

For the first meaning, the past form is "pleaded (for / to)." For the secondary (legal) meaning, the past tense form is "pled."

I did legal work for many years in the US, and I currently teach English. This is my informed opinion, and I'm sticking to it - although I really don't care which term people use.

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