Comments for Pain in the English http://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Fri, 27 May 2016 03:16:32 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Nope by Alan Omoly http://painintheenglish.com/case/511/#comment-26812 Alan Omoly Thu, 26 May 2016 11:50:50 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/511/#comment-26812 Would Nancy Reagan's Just Say No To Drugs campaign been more successful if it was Just Say Nope To Dope?

As comedian John Mulaney noted, In porn movies you hear lots of "Yea", "Oh Yeah","Uh-Huh","Mm-hmm","Yes YES!" but never "Yep"

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Comment on age vs. aged by Angelica Diaz Martinez http://painintheenglish.com/case/97/#comment-26811 Angelica Diaz Martinez Wed, 25 May 2016 20:45:48 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/97/#comment-26811 One of these areas included young adults and middle aged adults.

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Comment on “graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”? by marcel http://painintheenglish.com/case/4505/#comment-26809 marcel Mon, 23 May 2016 19:28:12 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4505/#comment-26809 graduate high school simply goes against the grain , the structure of the language, that is why it sounds so illiterate ! It has nothing to do with idiomatic expressions. Whenever I hear it , as i did today on NBC News , it's a shock !!

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Comment on Friendly - adjective and adverb? by Miguel http://painintheenglish.com/case/4136/#comment-26808 Miguel Sun, 22 May 2016 21:24:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4136/#comment-26808 With friend, the adverb form matches the adjective form. Both are "friendly".

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Phils http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26807 Phils Thu, 19 May 2016 17:01:58 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26807 This debate has gone on since June, 2004. I will say I've learned that Curriculum Vitae is singular and Curricula Vitae is plural (vitarum would mean each one refers to multiple lives)... but as far as resume is concerned, there have been professors, editors, French people, Canadians, Australians, so on, all discussing this and arguing over which dictionary is correct and so on...

It seems that, much like the required number of licks to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop... the world may never know.

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by Warren http://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-26806 Warren Thu, 19 May 2016 11:42:05 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-26806 Which is incorrect?
a. Lucia enjoys cooking more than him.
b. The success of the plan depends on us girls.
c.I wouldn't trust Nancy or her with my secret.

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Comment on Complete sentence in parentheses by wordy smith http://painintheenglish.com/case/5609/#comment-26805 wordy smith Thu, 19 May 2016 02:23:33 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5609/#comment-26805 Complete sentence in parentheses

Parentheses (constantly utilized as a part of sets) allow a writer to provide additional information. The parenthetical material may be a solitary word, a part, or various complete sentences.

Whatever the material inside the brackets, it must not be syntactically fundamental to the encompassing sentence. If it is, the sentence must be recast. This is a simple mix-up to keep away from. Just read your sentence without the parenthetical content. If it makes sense, the the enclosures are satisfactory; if it doesn’t, the punctuation must be altered.

http://wordmaker.info/ending-with/fe.html

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Comment on Proper usage of “as such” by wordy smith http://painintheenglish.com/case/5591/#comment-26804 wordy smith Thu, 19 May 2016 01:53:59 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5591/#comment-26804 Appropriate utilization of “as such”

The expression "as such" is not a synonym for "accordingly" and its reciprocals. This is a modern and incorrect utilization, although regrettably progressively basic. The expression signifies "in such capacity" or "in itself"; these are its sole right meanings.

My guess is that the common misuse of this expression arises from the fact that there is frequently a close logical connection between use of "accordingly" and its reciprocals and "as such", although the nuance is different.

By method for instance, here are two right sentences which pass on considerably the same importance, and which contrast just in supplanting "as such" with "appropriately":

I am a lawyer, and as such I am formally qualified to express opinions about legal matters.

I am a lawyer, and accordingly I am formally qualified to express opinions about legal matters.

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Comment on “went missing/gone missing”? by Missy Vanavery http://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-26803 Missy Vanavery Wed, 18 May 2016 23:53:31 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-26803 Thank God I am MOT crazy. For the last 10 years i have been aghast as well as bemused at this seemingly "sudden" change in grammar when referring to the "disappearance " so something or someone.Usually "a person"or "an airplane".
God thank you for guiding me to the good old "Google". Now I know, as I thought, it is just another slang attempting to be sophisticated in the British fashion. Now I can sleep at night.Yeah!

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Joe Hatch http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26802 Joe Hatch Sun, 15 May 2016 13:22:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26802 I hate hearing every news story using the (wrong) word: pleaded. I agree that there is a perfectly good word to express the past tense of entering a plea, and that is pled. Even now, when I type "pled", the auto-spell underlines it in red, as if I've typed a non-word. What's next? Now that the media says that I've pleaded at court, should I say that I've readed the book, or that I've feeded the dog? Perhaps I should have leaded a revolt when the media began using pleaded instead of pled.

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-26801 Hairy Scot Sun, 15 May 2016 02:48:08 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-26801 Nor I.

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Comment on He was sat by Tom Welch http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26800 Tom Welch Sat, 14 May 2016 23:31:16 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26800 “She was sat beneath a tattered sunbrella on the promenade at Playa Serena, poking at her mothballed novel, when Ian rolled up on his trike.”

Excerpt From: Dozois, Gardner. “The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Second Annual Collection.” St. Martin’s Press. iBooks.

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by cris http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26799 cris Fri, 13 May 2016 10:56:22 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26799 2.490

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by V. http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-26798 V. Thu, 12 May 2016 11:15:30 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-26798 "Me neither" in almost all situations is being used to mean "I don't want to". Therefore, the word "me" is being used as the subject of the sentence and is incorrect, because "me" is the objective case.
I know that "me neither" sounds normal because it is commonly used. However, the question concerns what is correct English, so any of us who have come to this site recognize that there is a standard to which we comparing our speech.
Therefore, the concept that if a "native speaker uses it, then it must be correct" is abhorrent to me. If that were true, there would never be English classes in school and there would be no sites like this!

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Comment on History of “-ish” by Floccinaucinihilipilification http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26797 Floccinaucinihilipilification Thu, 12 May 2016 09:35:57 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26797 I also heard it with reference to color, but that sounds okay to me. Like, the color is "greenish", do describe something between blue and green or between brown and green to say that it has a hint of green or that it's kind of green but not completely, you know what I mean?
But 'coolish' and 'aroundish' sound awkward to me. I think it is better not to overuse it, it sounds annoying to me like this...

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Comment on Inch vs. Inches by Craig Nelson http://painintheenglish.com/case/2396/#comment-26796 Craig Nelson Wed, 11 May 2016 12:42:34 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/2396/#comment-26796 Our company style guide says, "In situations where space is an issue, such as in charts or tables, abbreviations may be used: 16-in. screen. Always abbreviate inches as in., don't use 0." What the heck do they mean by "don't use 0." (zero) ?

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Comment on Someone else’s by WT http://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26795 WT Wed, 11 May 2016 01:11:05 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26795 A local TV station has a segment called "The Turko Files." The "anchors" persist in announcing, "the Turko Files are next." Eeeek!

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Comment on “Changed the calculus”? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5626/#comment-26794 jayles the unwoven Tue, 10 May 2016 16:51:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5626/#comment-26794 @HS "Calculus" is perhaps first encountered as some awful maths concept and formula at school, and seems to be the most common meaning. However, there are alternatives, including specialist meanings in dentistry and medicine, and also a more general meaning as follows:

"A decision-making method, especially one appropriate for a specialised realm. " (wiktionary)

"calculation; estimation or computation" (dictionary.com)


2008 December 16, “Cameron calls for bankers’ ‘day of reckoning’”, Financial Times:

The Tory leader refused to state how many financiers he thought should end up in jail, saying: “There is not some simple calculus."

If a Tory PM has used the word in this meaning, it must be okay, mustn't it?

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Peggy Roberts http://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-26793 Peggy Roberts Mon, 9 May 2016 10:07:08 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-26793 It isn't a southern thing. ..it's an African American thing exclusively.

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Comment on “go figure” by Angi http://painintheenglish.com/case/5551/#comment-26792 Angi Fri, 6 May 2016 02:08:55 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5551/#comment-26792 Perhaps you might be conflating the two sayings "go figure" and "it figures"? Is there some distinction to be had there?

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Comment on waiting on by Angie B. http://painintheenglish.com/case/5498/#comment-26791 Angie B. Fri, 6 May 2016 02:00:31 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5498/#comment-26791 I don't know if this really helps, but just for this example alone I would interpret "waiting on your mother" to mean the rest of the family is ready to depart for somewhere and she's holding up the group while "waiting for your mother" would mean she has not yet arrived where the others are located. (I'm from Michigan, for what it's worth.)

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by https://www.facebook.com/TiRodTactical http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26790 https://www.facebook.com/TiRodTactical Thu, 5 May 2016 11:01:18 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26790 Yes,....when I opened my P.O. Box about two years ago (but since closed),....the Postal Worker gave me BOTH the usual P.O.Box Full Address AND an acceptable UPS / FedEx, or other Private Carrier Delivery Address that ALLOWS delivery to your P.O. Box in a round about way. The Mailing address reflects the physical address of the Post Office Branch, with the P.O. Box listed to the side. Technically the Private carrier IS delivering to a physical street address, and the Post Office is sort of forwarding it to your box. haha

Apparantly, the Post Office Head Honchos have decided "Practicality" trumps Federal Statutes. :-)

Joe T

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Comment on As wet as ? by ines http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26789 ines Thu, 5 May 2016 08:49:25 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26789 as wet as a fish

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Comment on who vs. whom by Gretchen Davis http://painintheenglish.com/case/5018/#comment-26788 Gretchen Davis Wed, 4 May 2016 11:58:55 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5018/#comment-26788 Which is correct:

Who does he look like?
Whom does he look like?

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by trinity http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26787 trinity Wed, 4 May 2016 09:20:27 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26787 it doesent work

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Dames http://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26786 Dames Wed, 4 May 2016 08:39:25 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26786 I really love this site, and the design.

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Comment on couple vs couple of by Russell Davis http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26785 Russell Davis Wed, 4 May 2016 08:04:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26785 "A couple of x" is definitely correct; omitting "of" is just one more of countless examples of our "progressively" more illiterate society where what once would have been red lined in grade school is now sadly found in the NY Times, once our nation's leading newspaper, now it's leading laughingstock.

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Comment on obliged or obligated? by Vitaly Tomilov http://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-26784 Vitaly Tomilov Wed, 4 May 2016 04:36:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-26784 Obliged refers to something one should do, or even pleased to do. Obligated refers to something one is expected or supposed to do.

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Comment on hanged vs. hung by Charles Russell http://painintheenglish.com/case/503/#comment-26783 Charles Russell Mon, 2 May 2016 21:39:50 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/503/#comment-26783 I'm an antiquarian. I want my careful (though defective, of course) education to matter. Should my position have any legitimacy? I think it has always been a strong motivation for those who resist linguistic change; and sloppiness has always been a pressing reason for it.

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by Doraemon http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26782 Doraemon Mon, 2 May 2016 11:05:50 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26782 I thought it mean if a boy don't involve themself with girl , they won't ever get hurt and you know won't never cry .

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Comment on “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve” by Elie http://painintheenglish.com/case/4715/#comment-26781 Elie Mon, 2 May 2016 07:04:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4715/#comment-26781 People use it a lot it hurts!
a sarcastic example would be by singing:
" Would OF " the red nosed reindeer

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Comment on How many “ands” in a row by thedragon9059 http://painintheenglish.com/case/492/#comment-26780 thedragon9059 Sat, 30 Apr 2016 00:59:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/492/#comment-26780 Is it just me, or is the spacing between 'Pig' and 'and' and 'and' and 'And' and 'And' and 'and' and 'and' and 'And' and 'And' and 'and' and 'and' and 'Whistle' just a little bit off...?

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Comment on Proper usage of “as such” by ggh http://painintheenglish.com/case/5591/#comment-26779 ggh Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:45:33 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5591/#comment-26779 Admin, if not okay please remove!

Our facebook group “selfless” is spending this month spreading awareness on prostate cancer & research with a custom t-shirt design. Purchase proceeds will go to cancer.org, as listed on the shirt and shirt design.

www.teespring.com/prostate-cancer-research

Thanks

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Comment on Is the following sentence using the word “yet” correctly? by aresearch http://painintheenglish.com/case/5579/#comment-26778 aresearch Fri, 29 Apr 2016 11:09:59 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5579/#comment-26778 Can truly relate and retain this outstanding post. Very well written. http://www.availresearchhelp.com

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Comment on History of “-ish” by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26777 Hairy Scot Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:06:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26777 @Philip
Never seen or heard "ish" used in the manner you describe.
In my experience it's more commonly used to mean "around" or "about", as in "What time will you arrive?" "12ish"

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Comment on History of “-ish” by Philip http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26775 Philip Mon, 25 Apr 2016 22:57:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26775 Yes. Sorry for the confusion.
What I mean by "ish" is the "ish" I saw on a note fastened to a local store's locked entrance door that claimed they would return in fifteen"ish" minutes to reopen. I have also experienced the statement made, "That's cool'ish'". When I asked someone where something that I was looking for was I received the answer, "it's around'ish'". I understand its meaning but why the need for it? Is it laziness? Has it become so pop culture that now it is in common use in our languages? Do we fear committing to the very statements we make? "Ish" to me implies a lack of confidence. Call me old fashioned, but when a store owner used to claim they would return in fifteen minutes they, more often than not, would. But a store owner claiming to return in fifteen'ish' minutes means they could either return in fifteen, twenty, thirty or sixty minutes. There seems to be no accountability in "ish".

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Comment on History of “-ish” by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26774 jayles the unwoven Mon, 25 Apr 2016 20:12:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5617/#comment-26774 Just to be clear: we are not discussing the "-ish" ending of words like abolish, punish, which comes from French.
"-ish" in the sense of "somewhat" is recorded in the OED as far back as 1894/1916
The alternative is to use the French version: "-esque" .
"Ish" has become a new standalone word in British English, meaning somewhat.

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Comment on Why do people feel it necessary to add “of” to some phrases? by Philip http://painintheenglish.com/case/5611/#comment-26773 Philip Mon, 25 Apr 2016 16:10:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5611/#comment-26773 I will be honest and say that I have no academic background in the use of words, grammar or punctuation, that is aside from a high school diploma that I barely acquired in my youth. In fact, in almost everything that I have typed, am typing and will type, it will be quite understandable if one was to find a multiple amount of errors. I have probably proven this within the few sentences that I have written here. However, this does not stop me from trying, nor does it stop me from learning. I love to learn about words, their history and their origins. Before I research, when I come across a word that I do not know I first guess at it's story and then search it out. So allow me to try that here with the word 'of'

Now I could be completely wrong or I could be on to something. When I think of 'of', I think of it in relation to a subject or topic. When we say "How bad of a decision" the of refers to the particular decision. If we were to say "How bad a decision" there is more ambiguity as to what decision is being referenced. "How bad a decision?" could be any decision, whereas "How bad of a decision?" is more specific to the situation at hand. "A decision" is more abstract and free. "'Of' a decision" is a little more concrete and belonging to. Call me crazy or just plain wrong, but hey I got to play in the world of words for but a few moments.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by jayles the unknighted http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26772 jayles the unknighted Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:24:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26772 Someone asked me how to respond to a text message (from a prospective employer) which began "Hey John" .
My usual advice is use whatever they do - use "Dear" if they do, and "Hi" if they do - but, hey, "Hey" sounded just too informal, and "Dear" too formal, so the solution was "Hi " + first name.
"Hey" is NOT the same as 'Hello' or 'Hi'

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Philip http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26771 Philip Mon, 25 Apr 2016 10:37:02 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26771 I wonder if it does not stem even further back to ancient Hebrew or ancient Semitic language. From my understanding the letter "hey" represents the divine breath or revelation. So "hey" would be a revealing of oneself, in this case God, to that of others via divine breath. We are aware of the others presence when we see them move(like breathing) and communicate, but we say they are not with us when they cease to do so (i.e. death). So when we express "hey" we are actually calling peoples attention to the fact that we are present and breathing, we are indeed alive. It is also a recognition to the other that we are aware of them also. It is a very old custom of greeting that brings attention to one another, that makes aware that each breathes and that each is acknowledged. It is really a relational word, that has perhaps taken on, unfairly, negative meanings.

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Laura Evans http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26770 Laura Evans Mon, 25 Apr 2016 09:06:32 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26770 how do I type out or write 1 and 42 hundredths percent

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Comment on Irregardless? by dj-emir http://painintheenglish.com/case/238/#comment-26769 dj-emir Thu, 21 Apr 2016 05:38:07 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/238/#comment-26769 Well regardless of how you feel about this word, it is a word created in error and used in error. It has been erroneously used by several famous authors of the past and present at the chagrin of their contemporaries. Current dictionaries have begun listing the "word" as a non standard word, and apparently many people do not understand what Non Standard means and take that to mean it IS a word. It is a word as in it is in common use. But common misuse does not make it a VALID word when what you actually mean already has a word associated with it. I once corrected a co worker and then my girlfriend about the "word" Irregardless stating that it is not actually a word. A second co worker defended my position immediately with he's correct. I then defined it quickly in an explanation that regardless was already having no regard for something so Irregardless would be "having no regard for having no regard or rather just having regard for something, which obviously is not the meaning she had originally intended. I said the word you would use would be regardless, as in not having any regard for something. Since the other coworkers corroborated my reasoning the dictionary was not sought after that day. Fast forward just a few months later and it was my girlfriend (now my wife) that ended up spouting the word irregardless to which the challenge was issued when I said that it wasn't an actual word. I sort of lost and won the bet at the same time since the "word" was actually in the dictionary but it's definition was : Though in widespread use, this word should be avoided in favor of Regardless. (See Regardless) I never had a problem with knowing this was a false word since I always think of words in a scientific way, that is I think to myself what is the possible root of the word and what is the possible meaning they are trying to convey, does this new word convey what they think it conveys? The only time I use IRREGARDLESS is when I make fun of that particular argument and use it as a means to remind her not to always argue things she's not completely certain of lest we look things up again because 8 out of 10 times I win these "Lets look it up" arguments :) - www.djemir.com

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by emmanuel http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26768 emmanuel Thu, 21 Apr 2016 02:12:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26768 It means "Please don't cry, my love".
When I'm away looking for a living in the post WW2 society of Jamaica, don't shed a tear.
For everything's gonna be alright, and we'll eat cornmeal porridge together later this night. Trust me.

This song is about love, and how a man reassure his spouse ... it's never about breaking up, it's never about abusing of women

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Comment on As wet as ? by YAY http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26767 YAY Wed, 20 Apr 2016 20:53:56 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26767 As wet as a marathon dog!

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by George Stephen http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26766 George Stephen Wed, 20 Apr 2016 09:48:37 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-26766 single: curriculum vitae
plural: curricula vitarum

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Braindabrian http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26765 Braindabrian Mon, 18 Apr 2016 20:33:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26765 Pleaded is correct grammar, pled is what sounds more pleasing to the ear because it's been used for so long, mainly by American journalist. But in the past few years we've found it being replaced with pleaded, as the main authorities on grammar say it's the correct choice.

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Comment on Signage by Eric Tuten http://painintheenglish.com/case/4509/#comment-26764 Eric Tuten Mon, 18 Apr 2016 10:03:17 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4509/#comment-26764 Ugh! In my mind, "signage" is another abominable creation of the business, or perhaps military, culture--along with "utilize" (gag!) and the use of "grow" as a transitive (e.g., "We need to grow our business by at least 10% or we're in trouble.").

These hideous words are akin to using "impact" as a verb: "He impacted me greatly." (Please don't make me heave my breakfast!). Sadly, I alone won't succeed in stopping the world from using impact in this way, but I am not going to slip into such mediocrity myself. I dread the day--and it will come!--when "impact" used as a verb will become "impactize." Again, ugh!

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26763 Hairy Scot Sun, 17 Apr 2016 17:10:27 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26763 @Sombody123

Yep, just like speed limits and taxes.

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Sombody123 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26762 Sombody123 Fri, 15 Apr 2016 00:51:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26762 Well I just wanted to say that Proper Grammar is a lie there is no such thing, and we shouldn't conform to it we should get rid of it altogether.

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Comment on “This Wednesday” vs. “Next Wednesday” by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-26761 jayles the unwoven Wed, 13 Apr 2016 21:28:26 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-26761 @Wheelye With so much international emailing, it is just a matter of avoiding ambiguity. In the same way it is better to avoid ambiguous date formats such as 03/04/2016 and always to spell out the month: March 4, 2016 or 4th March 2016. Similarly if one simply says "this Wednesday" or "Wednesday week" or in an email adds the day as "Wed 12th", then all is clear.

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