Comments for Pain in the English http://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Thu, 30 Jun 2016 05:57:38 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Might could by vgb http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26863 vgb Wed, 29 Jun 2016 21:53:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26863 I am from all over, but my parents are from Idaho, so I'm not sure the regions identified in previous posts have a monopoly on the form. Anyway, I inherited "might could" from one of parents, and find it very useful. The way I use it, it deflates the less cooperative "might," alone as in "I might do that," which sounds like a teenager challenging an authority figure.

"I might could do that" suggests a willingness to try rather than an insouciant "I might," as in "if I feel like it."

I have a BA in English and an MA in teaching English as a Second Language. If one of my international students used "might could," I would be over-joyed. There are so many worse "infractions" with modals. Believe me, I see them every day.

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Comment on all _____ sudden by vgb http://painintheenglish.com/case/483/#comment-26862 vgb Wed, 29 Jun 2016 20:11:07 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/483/#comment-26862 I hear "all the sudden" in interviews on NPR. I agree with asheibar that such colloquialisms emerge because they are heard and passed on, but not seen in written text. It reminds me of the occasion someone had written on the blackboard, "It's a doggy dog world." Clearly, whoever wrote this had never seen the written version, "It's a dog eat dog world." Well, marzy dotes and dozey dotes and little lambsy divey" !

It does not bother me that colloquialisms emerge and colonize the language; what bothers me is that it seems that reading is becoming a quaint, anachronistic habit performed by backward looking people who haven't caught on that it's all in the tweet.

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Comment on First Generation vs. Second Generation by Art http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26861 Art Wed, 29 Jun 2016 10:00:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26861 The term "First" or "Second Generation", omits the obvious, first or second generation "American". If we say that those who immigrated are the 1st, then by definition their children are 2nd. But that poses a problem, not everyone who immigrates becomes an "American" (11 million are not even legal residents). Although a bit confusing because many of them (I am one of them) do end up becoming American, for clarity, we need to start calling only those who are born here the First Generation.

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by A Lego Fan http://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-26860 A Lego Fan Mon, 27 Jun 2016 23:21:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-26860 It's always been LEGO to me (caps or not). I see people who use "Legos" as casual consumers of the product, and should have no business writing about LEGO for public viewing.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by benjamin1 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26859 benjamin1 Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:29:14 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-26859 Did I get an earful on a "Hey!" when I was in London!!

The concierge in my apartment really took offence when I casually greeted him - "Hey!"

I got something on these lines:
"That's very disrespectful of you. How dare you 'hey' me?!"

So I have been ever so careful when using "hey" over a "hi" or a "hello". I thought this was a very English thing, but quite surprising to find quite a few English folks on this page to be okay with "hey".

Hey, what the heck!

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Comment on Might could by jeb http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26858 jeb Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:08:36 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-26858 I might could say something about snobby grammarians...bless their hearts...but I won't.

As a well educated native of southern Appalachia (BA in English; PhD in Education), I can say with confidence that might could is mighty useful modal construction that conveys nuance and a sophisticated appreciation of the historical English, at least as spoken by the Scotch Irish settlers who populated these parts.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_English

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26857 Hairy Scot Sat, 25 Jun 2016 17:36:35 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26857 Oops.
Forgive the extra line in my previous post.
A thought that died at birth.

:)

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26856 Hairy Scot Sat, 25 Jun 2016 17:33:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26856 We could call it "oblique speech", or even "roundabout speech", or we could use a derivative of euphemism, metaphor, or allegory.
I am sure there a a number of terms that could be used to avoid the inevitable confusion caused by the use of the term "indirect speech" in this context.
.
Perhaps a simpler solution would be to refer

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Comment on Someone else’s by Don http://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26855 Don Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:04:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-26855 An adverb, such as else, cannot be made possesive. That is reserved for nouns and pronouns. Else cannot be made in a possesive form. If used, it is poor English.

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Comment on “Rack” or “Wrack”? by OJ http://painintheenglish.com/case/5371/#comment-26854 OJ Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:59:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5371/#comment-26854 Doesn't look good on proofreading site to find: "tends ton go along" (on this page)

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Comment on Everybody vs. Everyone by Lumme Celli http://painintheenglish.com/case/1022/#comment-26853 Lumme Celli Wed, 22 Jun 2016 12:57:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/1022/#comment-26853 I´d like to thank you all for this nice help ( :

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Comment on Texted by mary jane parker http://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-26852 mary jane parker Wed, 22 Jun 2016 08:40:11 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-26852 we don't say look-ed --- we say looked.

therefore -- texted, as in looked

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Diana Kay http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26851 Diana Kay Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:50:45 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-26851 I need to write out 65.25476% for a document. Can you help

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26850 jayles the unwoven Mon, 20 Jun 2016 00:28:23 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26850 Whilst I agree that the term "indirect speech" has almost always been used in writing to refer to "reported speech", it has on occasion been used to refer to oblique or circuitous ways of addressing a topic. For instance, in some tome on Quakerism from 1808:

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=bNQ3AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA16&dq=%22indirect+speech%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiC6JPy37XNAhWEi5QKHbBkB844ChDoAQhBMAk#v=onepage&q=%22indirect%20speech%22&f=false

and in Judson's Burmese-English dictionary 1893 "this speech is indirect and circuitous":

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=LSEYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA258&dq=%22speech+is+indirect%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo36aQ37XNAhULFpQKHQ_HD_gQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=%22speech%20is%20indirect%22&f=false

The question for you would be if the term "indirect speech" is not to be used for these types of polite roundabout ways of addressing a topic, what other terminology could be used?

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Comment on Indirect Speech? by jayles the unwoven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26849 jayles the unwoven Mon, 20 Jun 2016 00:27:31 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5649/#comment-26849 Whilst I agree that the term "indirect speech" has almost always been used in writing to refer to "reported speech", it has on occasion been used to refer to oblique or circuitous ways of addressing a topic. For instance, in some tome on Quakerism from 1808:

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=bNQ3AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA16&dq=%22indirect+speech%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiC6JPy37XNAhWEi5QKHbBkB844ChDoAQhBMAk#v=onepage&q=%22indirect%20speech%22&f=false

and in Judson's Burmese-English dictionary 1893 "this speech is indirect and circuitous":

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=LSEYAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA258&dq=%22speech+is+indirect%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo36aQ37XNAhULFpQKHQ_HD_gQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=%22speech%20is%20indirect%22&f=false

The question for you would be if the term "indirect speech" is not to be used for these types of polite roundabout ways of addressing a topic, what other terminology could be used?

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Comment on couple vs couple of by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26848 Hairy Scot Sun, 19 Jun 2016 19:43:33 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26848 It is all part of an evil American plot to eliminate prepositions.

:)

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Comment on couple vs couple of by Carmen Ficarra http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26847 Carmen Ficarra Sat, 18 Jun 2016 16:37:38 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/267/#comment-26847 Think of all the apples in the world. You just want two apples. So you choose "a couple of" them. That's how I see it. Perhaps some people confuse "a couple apples" with "a few apples." Interesting how they do get "few" right: No one says, "a few of apples." Seems people should be able to keep the two separate without using up too much brain power.

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by mary Pat olson http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26846 mary Pat olson Thu, 16 Jun 2016 10:23:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26846 Is "there her is! correct?

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by mary olson http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26845 mary olson Thu, 16 Jun 2016 10:20:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26845 I play a game with my grandchild: Put her blanket over her head and ask where she is...she pulls it down and I say "there her is!" Is this correct English?

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by William Hagerbaumer http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26844 William Hagerbaumer Thu, 16 Jun 2016 03:10:49 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26844 I guess it's my age 81, but fought rather than fit or fighted as past tense for fight seems right to me. However, lit rather than lighted as past tense for light seems right to me. I guess to be consistent Joshua should have fit the battle of Jericho as the song says. I certainly do not go along with lighted or fighted although I have never heard fighted. Of course, I am a fan of fled over fleeded and pled over pleaded although my spell checker is not.

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Comment on No Woman No Cry by Akira http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26843 Akira Mon, 13 Jun 2016 12:17:20 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/183/#comment-26843 No Woman No Cry is a reference to Englands prior control of Jamaica. "Woman" is a reference to the Queen of England. They used to protest in Trench Town all night long against England. A purely political song.

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Steffi http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26842 Steffi Sun, 12 Jun 2016 05:45:18 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26842 Basil Hallward paints a picture of his pure and beautiful friend Dorian Gray. It is the best portrait Basil has ever drawn. While posing for it, Dorian met Lord Henry, another friend of Basil‘s, who has a bad influence on him. Basil said that he want to finish the picture today.Henry and Dorian went in the garden. Basil painted alone in the hause. Two houers later Basil cried:,, The Picture is ready. Dorian and Henry come in the room. They said that the picture was beautiful. Dorian said:,, I wish I could ever always be young, and the portrait could grow old. Basil gives Dorian his image. A few months later tells Dorian Lord Henry that he has fallen in love with an actress. Dorian went every night in the theater to see his Sibyl Vane. After the show he goes backstage and talks with Sibyl Vane. She calls him Prince Charming. Sibyl tells her mother and her brother James Vane that she is in love with Dorian Gray. Her mother find this not so beautiful, because she wants a son in law with a lot of money. Her brother James says that he kills Dorian when he hurt his sister. James is sailing with a ship for a few weeks to Australia. Dorian says that he wants to marry Sibyl. Lord Henry goes to see with Dorian to the theater to Sibyl again. That evening Sibyl plays very poorly. Lord Henry is outraged about that and he goes home. Dorian goes back behind the stage and he finds Sibyl wines. They talk to each other and she promises him that she makes even better on the next night. Dorian comes home late. He goes to the library where he has his portrait. He sees the image that not looks young it looks a little bite older. He is very shocked by that and he hides the image so that nobody can see it. A few days later comes his friend Basil. He wants the image to see but Dorian shows it is not him . Basil told Dorian the Sibyl is dead . Dorian is shocked . Dorian goes with Basil in the Bublothek and shows him the picture . Basil looks scared . Then Dorian takes a knife and kills Basil. The next day meets Dorian Alan Campbell. Dorian told him all over the dead body. He wants the dead body disappears with a strong acid. Alan Campbell is a chemist. Dorian shows him the dead body. Alan makes him disappear with an acid. At midnight comes Dorian on the harbor walk. Suddenly someone accesses he on the shoulder and keeps a weapon at the head. It is James the brother of Sibyl. Dorian talks to him and finally leaves James Dorian run. A few weeks later, Dorian meets Lord Henry with. They talk about the last six weeks. At night Dorian goes to the library. He looks at the picture. On picture is not a young one but a very old one. The man on the picture has bloody fingers and the feet’s. Dorian cries out against the terrible picture. Dorian takes a knife and stabs the picture. The caretaker has heard the scream and he ran into the library. He finds a young picture of Dorian Gray and an old man that lies on the floor.

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by Carole Peters http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26841 Carole Peters Sat, 11 Jun 2016 19:00:43 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-26841 My Post office asked me to change my street number to their street number for package delivery. Also change my PO Box number to Unit number. Now, I got a letter from one of my Credit Reporting agencies saying that one of my creditors reported that I have moved to a different address without telling them so I need to clear this up. i suppose this was supposed to make it easier for them deliver packages but it has resulted in unintended consequences for me. Should I write to each Credit Reporting Agency and explain that "No, I haven't moved. The Post Office just said I would have to write in a different street address or they would send any packages back without delivering them to me?"

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Comment on First Generation vs. Second Generation by Brian Bissonnette http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26840 Brian Bissonnette Sat, 11 Jun 2016 14:33:07 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-26840 Speaking of Generations and who was or what was the first Generation called brings me directly to the old school of defining Generations. Being a Christian, it must be said that God created the first Generation and it grew in names and in stature from then. How simple does it get from that perspective? Your thoughts?

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Comment on Hi all vs. Hi everybody by RAFAFA http://painintheenglish.com/case/681/#comment-26839 RAFAFA Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:43:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/681/#comment-26839 RAFAFAF

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Comment on As wet as ? by Alfie http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26838 Alfie Sat, 11 Jun 2016 10:12:47 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/596/#comment-26838 As wet as a spastics chin

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Comment on “pi the type” by Murray Kroma http://painintheenglish.com/case/2585/#comment-26837 Murray Kroma Fri, 10 Jun 2016 12:19:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/2585/#comment-26837 I remember the term as "pi the case", new it well. My boss called me clumsy.

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Comment on He was sat by Brus Watters http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26836 Brus Watters Wed, 8 Jun 2016 10:57:58 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26836 I agree wholeheartedly. When books which win prizes include passages in dialect I am not persuaded that therefore dialect is proved to be Standard English, as Tom Welch seemed to be arguing there. I am not sure that I go along with "there is no oral English tests", however, simply on the grounds of sing./plur. number. The tests are neglected because the teachers are lefties and think it would be seen as class discrimination. Bring back Latin, I insist.

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Comment on He was sat by Shay Kinsella http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26835 Shay Kinsella Wed, 8 Jun 2016 10:12:01 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4796/#comment-26835 It is most annoying when the words "Sat" and "Stood" are misused instead of sitting, seated, and standing. What also annoys me is the misuse of reflexive pronouns like myself or yourself instead of me and you. Unfortunately English is not taught in schools but it is more the appreciation of prose, poetry and drama. There is no oral English tests to see if students can speak properly. Grammar is totally neglected.

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by Grits http://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-26834 Grits Tue, 7 Jun 2016 18:54:48 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-26834 Grammar Intentionally Incorrect (or GII).
Insert cute emotji here.

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Comment on “as long as” vs. “so long as” by Shaymaa awad http://painintheenglish.com/case/2475/#comment-26833 Shaymaa awad Tue, 7 Jun 2016 09:40:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/2475/#comment-26833 Thank you very much I 'm English teacher and I want to improve my language especially conversations how can you help me ? Thanks alot

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by Fredyx http://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-26832 Fredyx Tue, 7 Jun 2016 07:15:10 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-26832 Use "it" in all cases, it's much easier.

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Comment on Pronouncing “str” like “shtr” as in “shtrong” “shtrange” by Chic Nerdstrom http://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-26831 Chic Nerdstrom Mon, 6 Jun 2016 14:52:44 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-26831 I recall education Blacks in the 1960s using this pronunciation. It seems that when Blacks used this pronunciation back then it signaled an educated person. I just went back to recorded speeches of Shirley Chisholm. She used this pronunciation. Then from usage by education blacks that pronunciation seems to have entered into mainstream Black pronunciation and from there into common, widespread, mainshtream White usage. It's as fingernails on a blackboard for me. It's now 2016 and I'm noticing that the "h" is now being added to "st" strings as in "shtory". Anyone else follow this thread from educated Black speech? I know language changes. It's a natural process but my ear catches on every single pronunciation of "st" and "str" as "sht" and "shtr". The silliest pronunciation recently heard was largest trees pronounced as "largesht shtreesh". Totally mangled in other words and barely intelligible.

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Comment on Correct use the adjective “key” by Bejeebers http://painintheenglish.com/case/5599/#comment-26830 Bejeebers Mon, 6 Jun 2016 14:34:03 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5599/#comment-26830 That word processor is Microsoft Word, I bet. I get the same thing: I type in something like "The new strategy he had proposed was key to the success of the project" and Word flags "key" as being wrong. It's a flaw in the word processor, because the usage of "key" is correct here.

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Comment on Possessive with acromyms ending in S by Scott Jenkins http://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-26829 Scott Jenkins Mon, 6 Jun 2016 08:54:52 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-26829 Does no one see the irony in the fact that this site offers professional proofreading services, yet they misspell the word acronym in 2 different ways? (acromym in the title and acromyn in the subtitle)

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Terri Lee doll http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26828 Terri Lee doll Sat, 4 Jun 2016 14:48:31 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-26828 It should be tested, its past tense, when you are referring to. She tested me last night. Just my opinion

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by GreenLego http://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-26827 GreenLego Sat, 4 Jun 2016 05:45:16 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-26827 LEGO is both singular and plural so LEGOs is not a valid word.

There was a recent movie called "The LEGO Movie". Why wasn't it called "The LEGOs Movie"? There were more than one piece of LEGO in the movie, so wouldn't it make more sense? It's because LEGO is already a plural.

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Heidi http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26826 Heidi Fri, 3 Jun 2016 15:51:53 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26826 I have always used pled and wondered where the switch to pleaded came from. To me it strikes me as incorrect as it would be to say breeded instead of bred.

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Wilbur http://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26825 Wilbur Thu, 2 Jun 2016 04:49:24 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-26825 Hey Pain,

Have to comment on the website first. Just found it, haven't clicked around yet, except for closing the "proof reading popup". I quite like the simplicity for the task it's meant for and the hidden "obnoxious" quirks :)

Sorry for not reading all the comments or a couple of them first, but I reckon since it's "Latin" it is quite open to interpretation.

I can be a grammar confectionist at times, but when it's ambiguous, I myself tend to use the option with less characters. Most probably because of my graphic & web design history. Less characters, smaller file size...

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Comment on Hyphen, N-dash, M-dash by paula park http://painintheenglish.com/case/72/#comment-26824 paula park Thu, 2 Jun 2016 03:42:29 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/72/#comment-26824 There is some history about the use of these dashes with old-fashioned printing machines, such as a linotype. Does anyone know how these machines made dashes?

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Marion MACdONALD http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26823 Marion MACdONALD Wed, 1 Jun 2016 17:55:00 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26823 HOW TO PRONOUNCE Aunt in Canada or is it Ant?

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Comment on On Tomorrow by GATeacher http://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-26822 GATeacher Wed, 1 Jun 2016 17:05:37 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-26822 Until I moved to Atlanta, I'd never heard the anyone use the "on tomorrow", and I'm from the South. As an educator, I hate listening to my principal say this on the morning announcements. I have to say that I feel I've done my job as a teacher when one of my second graders asked me why the principal used a preposition before the word tomorrow.

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by LoriH http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26821 LoriH Mon, 30 May 2016 19:27:25 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-26821 This is one I hear so many times that they both sound incorrect to me, so when someone calls and asks for me I simply say "speaking" or "this is Lori." Problem solved. If I had to choose one, this is her seems more logical.. such as to imply, this is her speaking.

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Hairy Scot http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26820 Hairy Scot Sun, 29 May 2016 23:36:05 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26820 Re: 'There is no pled!'

To quote The Everly Brothers 'Wake up little Suzie'.

Pled is alive and well and living in many Scottish courtrooms.

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Comment on “Friday’s Child” by guy1 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5632/#comment-26819 guy1 Sun, 29 May 2016 19:23:21 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5632/#comment-26819 Common modern versions include:

Monday's child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child is loving and giving,
Saturday's child works hard for a living,
But the child who is born on the Sabbath day
Is bonnie and blithe and good and gay.[1]
Often some of the lines are switched as in:

Monday's child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child works hard for a living,
Saturday's child is loving and giving,
But the child who is born on the Sabbath day
Is fair and wise and good in every way.
Origins[edit]
This rhyme was first recorded in A. E. Bray's Traditions of Devonshire (Volume II, pp. 287–288)[2] in 1838 and was collected by James Orchard Halliwell in the mid-nineteenth century.[1][not in citation given] The tradition of fortune telling by days of birth is much older. Thomas Nashe recalled stories told to "yong folks" in Suffolk in the 1570s which included "tell[ing] what luck eurie one should have by the day of the weeke he was borne on". Nashe thus provides evidence for fortune telling rhymes of this type circulating in Suffolk in the 1570s.[3]

There was considerable variation and debate about the exact attributes of each day and even over the days. Halliwell had 'Christmas Day' instead of the Sabbath.[1][not in citation given] Despite modern versions in which "Wednesday's child is full of woe," an early incarnation of this rhyme appeared in a multi-part fictional story in a chapter appearing in Harper's Weekly on September 17, 1887, in which "Friday's child is full of woe", perhaps reflecting traditional superstitions associated with bad luck on Friday – as many Christians associated Friday with the Crucifixion. In addition to Wednesday's and Friday's children's role reversal, the fates of Thursday's and Saturday's children were also exchanged and Sunday's child is "happy and wise" instead of "blithe and good".

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Susan Rose http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26818 Susan Rose Sat, 28 May 2016 16:50:51 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-26818 We are not talking connotation and de oration here. Plead is plead and the past is pleaded, end of discussion. There is no pled!

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Comment on Small Talk—Countable or Uncountable? by jayles the unshriven http://painintheenglish.com/case/5638/#comment-26817 jayles the unshriven Sat, 28 May 2016 16:04:42 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5638/#comment-26817 Oh, that didn't seem to work very well.
The main point is the verb to use with 'small talk' is 'make'. Eg We made small talk while waiting for the bus to come.
'I had a small talk with someone' to me suggests that there is some issue or grievance which needs to be settled in private; but possibly it is not used in this way in the US (or, who knows, by presidential candidates of the non-presidential variety ).

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Comment on Small Talk—Countable or Uncountable? by jayles the unblessed http://painintheenglish.com/case/5638/#comment-26816 jayles the unblessed Sat, 28 May 2016 15:55:19 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/5638/#comment-26816 It would be relatively unusual to make 'small talk' countable; one could say "She gave a small talk on ....", but that would be using the phrase in its literal meaning.
"Small talk" usually means talking about the weather, some football game, the latest shade of lipstick (or whatever women consider inconsequential) , or some other non-weighty matters.
http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=+*+small+talk&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C*%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bof%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bin%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bmake%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bfor%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bno%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bmaking%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bmade%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwith%20small%20talk%3B%2Cc0

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Kelvin Richardson http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26815 Kelvin Richardson Fri, 27 May 2016 17:56:46 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-26815 "Aunt" should rhyme with "Haunt;" therefore I say ont.
Born in Arkansas but raised in California.

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Comment on “study of” vs. “study on” by Reader http://painintheenglish.com/case/4134/#comment-26814 Reader Fri, 27 May 2016 12:41:17 +0000 http://painintheenglish.com/case/4134/#comment-26814 wtf? Maybe it's better, I prefer, then I would..

should this be of any help????

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