Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Mon, 5 Dec 2016 00:33:22 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27097 Brus Watters Sun, 4 Dec 2016 05:13:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27097 If we think it is pronounced 'resume-ay' we must think it means 'picked up where we left off' rather than 'summary' or 'summarised', and we are wrong then, no? That is why we need two accents, one on the first, another on the final syllable.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27096 Brus Watters Sun, 4 Dec 2016 05:09:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27096 A glance in your French dictionary makes it clear that the first and last syllables have acute accents, so the word means 'summary' or more exactly 'summarised'. It is pronounced Ray-zoom-ay, after all.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Sandymc44 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27095 Sandymc44 Sat, 3 Dec 2016 23:13:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27095 When I took French in college, I was taught that an accent aigu (acute) meant you were supposed to pronounce the "e" like long "a." So there's no need for accent aigu over the first e in resume (we don't say RAY ZOO MAY). One accent only please, or none at all works, too.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27094 Hairy Scot Sat, 3 Dec 2016 21:06:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27094 @Ralph Malph

"I have gotten...."??

No thanks!

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by olivia https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27093 olivia Thu, 1 Dec 2016 03:50:49 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27093 Except for a few basic rules, spelling out numbers vs. using figures (also called numerals) is largely a matter of writers' preference. Again, consistency is the key.
Rule 1 - Spell out all numbers beginning a sentence.
Rule 2 - Hyphenate all compound numbers from twenty-one through ninety-nine.
Rule 3 - Hyphenate all written-out fractions.
Rule 4 - With figures of four or more digits, use commas. Count three spaces to the left to place the first comma. Continue placing commas after every three digits.
Rule 5 - It is not necessary to use a decimal point or a dollar sign when writing out sums of less than a dollar.
Rule 6 - Do not add the word "dollars" to figures preceded by a dollar sign.
Rule 7 - For clarity, use noon and midnight rather than 12:00 PM and 12:00 AM.
Rule 8 - Using numerals for the time of day has become widely accepted.
Rule 9 - Mixed fractions are often expressed in figures unless they begin a sentence.
Rule 10 - Read more at https://www.essaypeer.com

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Ralph Malph https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27092 Ralph Malph Sat, 26 Nov 2016 18:38:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27092 Try "I have gotten...."

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by vivianisabella https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27091 vivianisabella Fri, 25 Nov 2016 09:47:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27091 I have some friends

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Comment on First Generation vs. Second Generation by AnonymousPerson https://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-27090 AnonymousPerson Thu, 24 Nov 2016 06:45:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/580/#comment-27090 Both of my parents were born in the UK, they had me whilst living in the US, I am thus first-generation American, they are immigrants. They can also be called first-generation migrants, but not first generation Americans as that term is reserved to describe one who was in fact born in the US to foreign born parents.

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Comment on “There can be only one” or “there can only be one”? by Liza Razali https://painintheenglish.com/case/5147/#comment-27089 Liza Razali Wed, 23 Nov 2016 02:15:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5147/#comment-27089 I know my comment is not related to your posting but I am desperate to know what font are you using here. I love it so much and plan to download it. Thank you so much!

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Comment on Walking Heavens by SpeakEnglandverydelicious https://painintheenglish.com/case/5700/#comment-27088 SpeakEnglandverydelicious Tue, 22 Nov 2016 19:33:46 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5700/#comment-27088 Yep... I agree with the hairy one

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Comment on Motives vs. Motivation by Lizagna https://painintheenglish.com/case/35/#comment-27087 Lizagna Tue, 22 Nov 2016 11:56:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/35/#comment-27087 To put it simply, a motive is a specific cause for one's actions, while motivation is the driving desire to do something.
For example: An individual's direct motive to become a better person might be because they had made terrible mistakes in the past. An individual's motivation to become a better person may come from a desire to make the world a better place.
While it is true that motive tends to have a negative connotation and motivation tends to have a positive connotation, this is irrelevant to the grammatically correct usage of the terms "motive" and "motivation".
Keep in mind that motive is more specific than motivation, which is a more general term.

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Comment on Word in question: Conversate by Marlene S. Johnson https://painintheenglish.com/case/4304/#comment-27086 Marlene S. Johnson Mon, 21 Nov 2016 22:54:43 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4304/#comment-27086 When was the word "signage" accepted into the dictionary?

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Comment on Where are the commas? by mary campbell https://painintheenglish.com/case/4/#comment-27085 mary campbell Mon, 21 Nov 2016 15:09:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4/#comment-27085 We had apples, oranges, and grapes for snack.

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Comment on data is vs. data are by IDon'tKnowMyNameHelp https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27084 IDon'tKnowMyNameHelp Mon, 21 Nov 2016 13:55:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27084 Either of them are correct though.
"Data" can be followed by both a singular and plural verb.
But personally I feel more like using "is".

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by SpeakEnglandverydelicious https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27083 SpeakEnglandverydelicious Mon, 21 Nov 2016 03:16:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27083 Lawpilot, you have addressed the usage of "just" rather than the point of the post which was "prior"
I also happen to disagree - just prior in the context of a traffic report would clearly mean within 20 to 100 metres. Just does not always mean only - have you ever used "just missed" or "just leaving now"?

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Random noone person is boozzsssy https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27082 Random noone person is boozzsssy Mon, 21 Nov 2016 00:05:39 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27082 Neither is just mouse as plural

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by Lawpilot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27081 Lawpilot Sun, 20 Nov 2016 13:17:48 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27081 "Just prior" is bad English regardless of its reference to time or space. English is supposed to be communicative. "Just" anything communicates "only." For example "just $10" means only $10. But, "just prior" means nothing because "prior" is not a point of reference. "Just prior to the turn-off" could mean one mile, ten miles, . . . before the turn-off. Correct English would be "half mile before the exit," or "one minute before the exit if you are traveling at 55MPH." 11/20/2016.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Lawpilot15 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27080 Lawpilot15 Sun, 20 Nov 2016 10:32:05 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27080 Goofy is wrong wrong wrong! First of all, "got" is the past tense of "to get." Second, juxtaposing "have" with "got" is bad English, even if the President does routingly. You would never answer "i got three dollars in my pocket" when asked how much money you have in your pocket. To say "have gotten" would be OK to convey that you have obtained something.

To all of those who think "have got to go" i have news for you, "gotta" is also bad English for adults. 11/20/2016.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Lawpilot https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27079 Lawpilot Sun, 20 Nov 2016 10:30:43 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27079 Goofy is wrong wrong wrong! First of all, "got" is the past tense of "to get." Second, juxtaposing "have" with "got" is bad English, even if the President does routingly. You would never answer "i got three dollars in my pocket" when asked how much money you have in your pocket. To say "have gotten" would be OK to convey that you have obtained something.

To all of those who think "have got to go" i have news for you, "gotta" is also bad English for adults. 11/20/2016.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by Marion Fossler https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27078 Marion Fossler Fri, 18 Nov 2016 15:02:42 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27078 I was taught that the "got," in "I've got," Is redundant and that " I have," is shorter and correct.
I wonder how the hard-on-the-ears "I've got," became acceptable.

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by gyufytf https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27077 gyufytf Fri, 18 Nov 2016 14:20:12 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27077 hghjggjhguyfg

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Comment on and so... by Ryan H https://painintheenglish.com/case/4559/#comment-27076 Ryan H Fri, 18 Nov 2016 01:20:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4559/#comment-27076 I'm new to writing as a serious, big-kid activity. This discussion was helpful, thank you. But I have say, is no one even going to reference "And so it goes." in this thread????

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Comment on data is vs. data are by SpeakEnglandverydelicious https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27075 SpeakEnglandverydelicious Thu, 17 Nov 2016 19:47:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27075 Agree with hstaunch@hotmail.com
Good analogies with sugar and information.

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by Robert Gossman https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27074 Robert Gossman Wed, 16 Nov 2016 18:53:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27074 Set my Amy Schumer book down, that I'm about half way through, and was amazed at the similarity of you and she.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by bobspeldbakwrds@hotmail.com https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27073 bobspeldbakwrds@hotmail.com Wed, 16 Nov 2016 15:31:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27073 I don't think it matters, as long as you don't use a preposition to end a sentence with.
Bob spelled backiwards

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Comment on Right Question For this Answer (about count/rank/order) by Samvasan https://painintheenglish.com/case/250/#comment-27072 Samvasan Wed, 16 Nov 2016 08:26:02 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/250/#comment-27072 In which prime ministrial election manmohan singh is elected aas president

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Comment on A quote within a quote within a quote by Mark Colligan https://painintheenglish.com/case/5112/#comment-27071 Mark Colligan Wed, 16 Nov 2016 01:47:39 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5112/#comment-27071 How about this dilemma: A quote within a quote within a quote:

Is A, B or C correct?

A.
The Administration reported in it's daily blogpost, "In awarding his student, Mr Moore said, 'Class, I was impressed when Kari told me that her father's dictionary states [...if you want to right a quote within a quote within a quote, you use brackets] so I awarded her a squirrel nugget.'"

B.
The Administration reported in it's daily blogpost, "In awarding his student, Mr Moore said, 'Class, I was impressed when Kari told me that her father's dictionary states '...if you want to write a quote within a quote within a quote, you use brackets' so I awarded her a candy.'"

The Administration reported in it's daily blogpost, "In awarding his student, Mr Moore said, 'Class, I was impressed when Kari told me that her father's dictionary states "...if you want to right a quote within a quote within a quote, you use brackets" so I awarded her a squirrel nugget.'"

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Comment on Reference, refer. by qrwfeR4232Q https://painintheenglish.com/case/679/#comment-27070 qrwfeR4232Q Mon, 14 Nov 2016 00:24:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/679/#comment-27070 I am only opposed to using reference as a verb because refer is shorter making reference sound pretentious.

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Comment on Idea Vs. Ideal by R.Hughes https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27069 R.Hughes Sun, 13 Nov 2016 16:31:18 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27069 I believe it is easier to say ideal vs. idea, it rolls off the tongue better! In addition, the meanings seem to be like splitting hairs. I have a great idea or I have a great ideal, what's the big difference? There is none.

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Comment on cannot vs. can not by Lautus https://painintheenglish.com/case/4513/#comment-27068 Lautus Thu, 10 Nov 2016 04:38:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4513/#comment-27068 You can use 'can not' if you want to emphasise the 'not' as 'cannot' has emphasis on the first syllable.

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Comment on data is vs. data are by hstaunch@hotmail.com https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27067 hstaunch@hotmail.com Tue, 8 Nov 2016 10:06:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27067 Yes, "data" may be plural, but the word "data" and the word "information" are often (if not always) interchangeable. Information is data. Just as it does not SOUND right for me to say the information ARE, it has never sounded right for me to say (or hear) "data are". I think of information as "stuff" and of data as "stuff." "The stuff is in the computer" does not sound bad. So thank you, I'll keep using IS with data. It might be Latin but I'm English-speaking. As far as I'm concerned it got transformed in the switch to English.

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Comment on data is vs. data are by Yourbame https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27066 Yourbame Tue, 8 Nov 2016 03:21:02 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5720/#comment-27066 But "data is" is grammatically wrong.
It comes from Latin, datum is singular, data is plural, therefore you need to conjugate the verb accordingly.

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Erica Runnels https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27061 Erica Runnels Mon, 7 Nov 2016 10:18:13 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27061 I live in Tennessee, which is home to southerners from every state. I began hearing my African American boss use the expression "on today" in her emails. Usually the context was along the lines of, "I hope all is well with you on today." I thought it was just a quirk she had because I had never heard anyone else speak that way. Then, a few months later, another African American woman joined our team who also uses such expressions. Could it be an aspect of southern dialect that is exclusive to African American culture? Have y'all noticed this or have you heard "on today" and "on tomorrow" from white people?

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by OSUBerk https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27060 OSUBerk Fri, 4 Nov 2016 12:09:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27060 If the past tense of twist (a verb) is twisted then the past tense of text (also a verb) would be texted, would it not?

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Comment on Correspondence by Uniquename https://painintheenglish.com/case/1375/#comment-27054 Uniquename Thu, 3 Nov 2016 11:56:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1375/#comment-27054 The plural of correspondence is correspondi B)~

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Susan Mars https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27053 Susan Mars Thu, 3 Nov 2016 11:55:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27053 It is not proper grammar. However, it does seem to be a popular phrase in the south, since I live in South Carolina and hear it a lot. I teach ELA and have for years. I explain it this way: You cannot do something ON tomorrow. How are you going to do that? Stand on tomorrow, or a piece of paper that has the word tomorrow on it? It is always best to leave that out. EX: We have a test tomorrow. NOT: We have a test on tomorrow.

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Comment on Exact same by Jinxgirl https://painintheenglish.com/case/1006/#comment-27052 Jinxgirl Thu, 3 Nov 2016 02:30:07 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1006/#comment-27052 Why use the words "exact" and "same" in the same sentence? Perhaps one could say she and I wore the same dress styles? The use of exact/same together just makes my teeth grate...arrgh.

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Comment on Someone else’s by Barrie https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27051 Barrie Wed, 2 Nov 2016 19:12:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27051 What part of speech is "else's" as in someone else's ?

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Gary https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27050 Gary Wed, 2 Nov 2016 06:56:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27050 I have heard that 'eg' is being used more often on websites, as it allows screen readers to pronounce it as 'e g' rather than 'e dot g dot' or 'e [sentence pause] g [sentence pause]'. Perhaps that is infiltrating other uses.

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Comment on The fact of the matter is is that by fiona1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5656/#comment-27048 fiona1 Mon, 31 Oct 2016 04:31:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5656/#comment-27048 It occurs to me that the post I made just now is altogether too technical!

In essence, people are misunderstanding a correct (though messy) construction and inserting a superfluous 'is' - basically, it appears, overthinking it.

So, 'What the problem is is that the government...' is a correct (if ugly) formation. The 'What the problem is' is the subject of the verb.

So people think that if they say 'The problem is' they must then add an 'is', and we get 'The problem is is that the government...' However, of course, the subject of the second example is simply 'the problem'. So it should read, 'The problem is that the government...'

I find it quite astonishing that this 'double-is' formation has achieved such prevalence in recent years, even amongst journalists and academics.

Never have I felt more Canute-like; I really must get over my frustration with this one, as I see absolutely no way of turning the tide!

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Comment on The fact of the matter is is that by fiona1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5656/#comment-27047 fiona1 Mon, 31 Oct 2016 04:11:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5656/#comment-27047 I'm glad this is annoying someone else (if you will forgive me!) - so frustrating to see so many people falling into this 'trap', and such educated ones, to boot!

Here are two useful links which explain it fully: http://www.casasanto.com/laura/documents/doubleis.pdf and http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001123.html

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Comment on “advocate for” or just “advocate”? by Susan https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27046 Susan Mon, 31 Oct 2016 00:44:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27046 As an American who attended grade school in Massachusetts starting in 1949 and received a truly excellent education, the awful decline of correct grammar usage in the US is driving me mad. The nearly universal use of "advocate for," which has become prominent in a very few years, makes me wince whenever I hear it and has me puzzled as to how it developed so quickly and became so common. I've heard rumors (or facts?) that English grammar is no longer being taught in our education system (!) and I can believe it, because I hear so much incorrect usage, both spoken and written. It gives backup to those who advocate the elimination of our federal department of education.

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Comment on “Tilting at Windmills” by Notawow https://painintheenglish.com/case/299/#comment-27045 Notawow Thu, 27 Oct 2016 18:42:46 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/299/#comment-27045 I interpret the concept of " Tilting at Windmills ", in the context of Don Quixote as a preambulary salute via his lance toward his adversaries both real and imagined , without regard of their intent , as an act of chivalry - while conceding the contest may be futile at best ... i.e...fighting the invincible foe , ect.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Claire https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27044 Claire Wed, 26 Oct 2016 22:00:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27044 Bryan Quach, you've solved the mystery!!!!! So both DO have diacritical marks; it's just that one goes to the left and one goes to the right. Twelve years after this thread started we finally have an answer that makes sense to me (unless someone else posted something similar in the past 12 years and I missed it. Thank you because honestly I didn't know about acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ) because I thought there was just é.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Bryan Quach https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27043 Bryan Quach Wed, 26 Oct 2016 21:31:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27043 Thing that gets you a job is from French rèsumé. Not resume, which is an English verb, nor résumé which is incorrect because é = ay in tray. è = e in bed.

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Comment on The Term “Foreigner” by Lori M. https://painintheenglish.com/case/278/#comment-27042 Lori M. Tue, 25 Oct 2016 17:32:30 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/278/#comment-27042 "People from other countries" is a better alternative for casual conversation I think. I'm Canadian, and I find the term "foreigner" to be extremely rude. It is not a term that is used much in Canada. If people feel hurt by that word, why would you insist on using it?

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Gman https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27041 Gman Tue, 25 Oct 2016 12:17:56 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27041 "I sent him a text"

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Comment on Possessive with acronyms ending in S by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27040 Hairy Scot Sun, 23 Oct 2016 18:17:20 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27040 An acronym is a pronounceable word made up of a series of initial letters or parts of words the possessive, or the plural possessive is handled in exactly the same way as it is for all words which end in S.
I would assume that the same hold true for the possessive plural of a set of initials.
eg: RADARs range, PDFs' size

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Comment on Possessive with acronyms ending in S by Akshata https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27039 Akshata Sun, 23 Oct 2016 17:52:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/333/#comment-27039 What's the right way to punctuate a plural possessive of an acronym? For instance, if you have more than one PDF, do you write "PDF's size," or "PDFs' size," or "PDFs's size"?

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Taipan99 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27036 Taipan99 Sat, 22 Oct 2016 21:51:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27036 There was a 'flip" of the pronunciation sometime in the late 70s/early 80s. Black Americans began pronouncing it as a Brit would say it--'ought' sound. Before then, it was always like the bug--'ant'.
I believe it had to do with wanting to sound more sophisticated, as growing up as a black man or woman in the USA in the 70s and 80s was still troubled, especially living and working in predominately Caucasian areas. Most likely a well known figure like Jesse Jackson or a more controversial one like Don King used it like that in a speech and it caught on.
Personally I think it sounds very ridiculous when you hear that same person saying "axe" for ask and other Ebonic pronunciations, but they hold on fast to the "ought" sound for aunt.

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