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Skeeter Lewis

Joined: March 16, 2012
Comments posted: 163
Votes received: 78

No user description provided.

Questions Submitted

The 1900s

June 11, 2015

Medicine or Medication?

October 27, 2012

Recent Comments

I'm more concerned about your last sentence: 'How serious is it to mandate that my international include this comma?'

Skeeter Lewis June 4, 2015, 5:22am

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It's American idiom. I've never heard it in England.

Skeeter Lewis June 4, 2015, 5:18am

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'Nervous of performing' sounds right to my ear.

Skeeter Lewis January 26, 2015, 8:48am

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I rather like the saying, "If you've got an issue, get a tissue."

Skeeter Lewis January 11, 2015, 10:41am

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Hairy - you're absolutely right: 'three laning' is indeed ugly.

Skeeter Lewis December 11, 2014, 8:06am

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@vwmoll
Welcome to the forum. If you care about the language, you'll fit in seamlessly. Yes - you're absolutely right - we can get tetchy from time to time. You'll get used to it.
Skeet

Skeeter Lewis November 17, 2014, 3:36pm

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I wonder if the Duke meant 'same exact' in the modern sense. Possible he meant that the Order was 'exact', that is, neat and soldierly, just as on exercise.

Skeeter Lewis October 31, 2014, 2:53pm

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WAIT HERE UNTIL RED LIGHT SHOWS.
Shows what?

Skeeter Lewis September 24, 2014, 4:00pm

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Saying aN Historic is an absurdity. Until comparatively recently, it was correct not to aspirate such words as hotel. That is why in older novels, one tends to see 'an hotel'. It was, of course, pronounced, by duke and dustman alike, 'an 'otel'.

Skeeter Lewis September 22, 2014, 3:37pm

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@Jayles. "Interest rates increased." Good example. Clever old interest rates.
It leaves one wondering where the rest of the sentence is. I don't mind the passive in moderation so long as it is a true passive, not this strange form that obeys no rule of logic.

Oddly, in my previous post I was about to do the same thing myself. I nearly wrote, "The sentences should read this way." Sentences don't read. People do.

Skeeter Lewis July 31, 2014, 3:18am

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Exactly. There is no passive there. And there should be.
The sentences should run this way:
"The situation was transformed into something quite different."
"That is translated as 'Beware Greeks bearing gifts.'"
Situations can't transform and words can't translate. They lack volition.

Skeeter Lewis July 30, 2014, 7:33pm

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@Jasper Saying 'idiomaticity' should be a test of sobriety.

Skeeter Lewis July 21, 2014, 12:44pm

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@JaspernotJason....Thank you.

Skeeter Lewis July 21, 2014, 12:29pm

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We all have a lot invested emotionally in our culture, and language is the repository of so much of it. It has to do with how we see ourselves individually and collectively. One can't always be clinical about these matters.

Skeeter Lewis July 20, 2014, 6:02pm

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It was meant light-heartedly and not meant to offend.
I think both sides in this continuing debate need to take a step back. If either side expresses itself too forcefully then the good-natured, enjoyable element is lost. And I say that in a non-partisan way.

Skeeter Lewis July 20, 2014, 9:31am

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It's true - dear old Will does try to bludgeon us to death with his tolerance.

Skeeter Lewis July 18, 2014, 10:27am

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'Reaching out' is one of those naff, feely-touchy phrases that companies have started to use to show they CARE.

Skeeter Lewis July 18, 2014, 10:23am

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The sudden appearance of 'no man is an island' in 1940 is probably owing to the publication in that year of 'For Whom The Bell Tolls'.

Skeeter Lewis July 3, 2014, 12:41pm

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Jayles - what an interesting observation. It's true: one doesn't hear them so much nowadays.
Perhaps those ready-made thoughts seem rather laboured and groan-worthy.

Skeeter Lewis July 2, 2014, 1:30pm

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An edit button, pretty please?

Skeeter Lewis June 24, 2014, 2:49am

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