Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Skeeter Lewis

Member Since

March 16, 2012

Total number of comments

165

Total number of votes received

135

Bio

Latest Comments

Are proverbs dying?

  • July 2, 2014, 1:30pm

Jayles - what an interesting observation. It's true: one doesn't hear them so much nowadays.
Perhaps those ready-made thoughts seem rather laboured and groan-worthy.

“As per ....”?

  • June 24, 2014, 2:49am

An edit button, pretty please?

“As per ....”?

  • June 24, 2014, 2:40am

Bugger.
'I've only ever seen that in Detroit' suggests that I may have heard it...but never seen it.

“As per ....”?

  • June 24, 2014, 2:38am

Has the 'only' drifted into the wrong place?
I've only ever seen that in Detroit.
I've seen that only in Detroit. (Ever being dropped)

'I've only ever seen that in Detroit' suggests that I may have seen it...but never heard it.

“As per ....”?

  • June 24, 2014, 2:11am

In English English slang a chrome dome is a baldy.

Using country name as an adjective?

  • June 23, 2014, 3:08am

My generation still calls it The Ivory Coast but 'the' has been dropped.

fewer / less

  • June 20, 2014, 3:50am

Will - thanks for your post. I think that the sort of people who write advertising copy are aware of American slang and tend to pick it up. They just don't get it right.

To me, as a Brit, mechanics has nothing to do with the study of English.

that vs. if and whether

  • June 13, 2014, 4:38am

Thanks, jayles. Economy, ecology and ecumenical are all derived from it. The English spellings (oeconomy, oecology and oecumenical) have finally given way to the simpler form, just as the 'ae' in, for example, mediaeval, has been shortened to plain 'e'.
In Britain we keep the spelling 'aesthete', pronounced with a long 'e'. Americans spell it 'esthete' and give it a short 'e'. As with 'Edipus', that sounds odd to me.

that vs. if and whether

  • June 12, 2014, 4:16pm

Economy, if memory serves, was originally spelled 'oeconomy' and would therefore have had (still does) a long O.
Americans tend to pronounce Oedipus, which they spell Edipus, with a short O, which sounds odd to me.

Questions

Medicine or Medication? October 27, 2012
What’s happening to the Passive? July 30, 2014
The 1900s June 11, 2015