Submitted by alinadeem on January 10, 2006

As wet as ?

as dry as a bone as cold as ice as sick as a dog as wet as ??? a fish? water? what’s right?

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AS WET AS RAIN!! Pitter Patter! lolz

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AS WET AS ME ;)

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no

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If you're in New Zealand you just say "wet as" with no simile needed.

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maybe "as wet as a sink"

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I won't help you in a cliché hunt, or a simile search. Why do you want to write that way? Unless you are a songwriter in need of a rhyme (cold as ice—sacrifice, e.g.) you should be striving to avoid the hackneyed phrase (such as "hackneyed phrase") like, well, the plague.

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what does Scar mean when he says that?

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there's one from the lion king.... as wet as a warthogs backside!

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as wet as your mams clout

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Colder than the fringe on a polar bear's bum.

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as wet as your mums undies.

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As wet as an otter's pocket?

As dry as a nun's gusset?

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Hey, AO, how about "as wet as the cold mushy oatmeal that George Bush has between his ears in place of brains"? What an indictment of modern US society that a man running for what is probably the highest office on this planet can win when the cornerstone of his campaign the first time was "Don't vote for Gore. He's really intelligent and I'm not. I'm stupid. I'm just like you, so you can trust me." I am actually frightened.

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How about "wet as Dick Cheney's appetite for shooting people in the face?" I kinda like that one.

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In response to Jim: Yes, I've seen Rome and gross but as far as similes and cliches go it is by far the most interesting.

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hi Zoltar,
Are you familiar with Warner Brothers cartoons? (Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, etc.) The phrase was originally used in one of their cartoons featuring the giant rooster character, Foghorn Leghorn and a young chicken hawk. The chicken hawk is doing something (I don't remember quite what) that Foghorn thinks is stupid or a waste of time. Foghorn turns to the audience and says something like "I say, that boy is about as sharp as a sack of wet mice."
I believe this was not a genuine expression before this, but was made up for the cartoon. It has since become a somewhat common expression. The meaning, of course, is that someone is dimwitted or stupid. The double entendre is sharp as in smart (intelligent) compared with sharp (pointy) vs. dull. Clearly a bag of furry, wet mice would not be sharp.
It's similar to another expression, "dumber than a bag of hammers", hammers being one of the simplest of tools.

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hey porsche, (or ne one)
Wat is the meaning of that pharse, "...but about as sharp as a sack 'a wet mice." ?
thanx

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As wet as October

Have you seen the series Rome?

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I must quote Lewis Carroll on this:

"The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry;"

("You could not see a cloud because no clouds were in the sky/No birds were flying overhead - there were no birds to fly.")

*wanders off quoting <i>The Walrus and the Carpenter</i>...*

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I think I have to take back my suggestion for "as wet as rain." The common expression that i was thinking about is "right as rain." Sorry, wrong dead metaphor, er, simile.

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Try using this word:

Drenched.

Same meaning, no unnecessary simile.

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There's no "correct" answer of course, and, in fact, "dry as a bone", "sick as a dog", etc. are cliches and should be used sparingly, if at all.

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Ok, I think I have the definitive answer:
"as wet as rain."

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"As wet as a drowned rat" is one I've heard a few times.

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as wet as an indian monsoon in June
as wet at the ocean floor

want more: http://www.flocabulary.com

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"as sharp as a sack of wet mice."
Ok, it doesn't start with "wet" but it does have "wet" in it.

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As wet as ... wet can be.

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as wet as your tongue? It's only dry if you're dead:)

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