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Joined: August 6, 2004  (email not validated)

Number of comments posted: 22

Number of votes received: 41

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Recent Comments

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 7, 2004, 5:18pm  •  0 vote

OK, Jun-Dai and speedwell, I've finally verified the thing in a usage dictionary -- you are right, and I was wrong.

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 7, 2004, 7:36am  •  0 vote

Naw, on second thought, still I'm not fully persuaded. A *targeted* search shows that while "envy" itself is a widely used word, the percentage of the "envy-whom-what" usage cases is vanishingly s

Re: Five O’clock Shadow  •  August 7, 2004, 6:32am  •  0 vote

Damn, right you are again. :-)

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 7, 2004, 6:31am  •  0 vote

OK, seems like you're right; I give up.

Re: Computer Keyboard  •  August 6, 2004, 6:54pm  •  0 vote

Not quite. All languages use the tilde (as the "approximate" sign, not as the spanish diacritic that goes over the letter like this "ñ": you can't achieve this latter with the "~" key). The "`" is a b

Re: Quotation Marks in Parenthetical Statement  •  August 6, 2004, 6:37pm  •  0 vote

Well, if you're not using quotes around the spelled-out version, why would you quote the acronym? Of course no quotes are necessary. The North-Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) -- no quotes. Why wou

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 6:30pm  •  0 vote

Yeah, I understand your point, but I don't think it's right. You indeed can "give David a hat", or "give a hat to David", but I don't think you can "envy David his success", or "envy his success to Da

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 1:09pm  •  0 vote

Btw, speedwell -- you say "Increased familiarity with correct English writing will convince you of this". Can you point to any examples of such use in correct and current English writing? Let's get to

Re: Pawshop  •  August 6, 2004, 12:56pm  •  0 vote

There aren't many left, and those few that remain are usually located in rather run-down neighborhoods (well, unsurprisingly, if you think what their business is.) You won't find any at an upscale loc

Re: At or in  •  August 6, 2004, 12:49pm  •  0 vote

Definitely "at war" -- and not "was" but "has been". "Was" means a condition that took place once and since ended. "Has been" means was and remains so now. So, "As far back as I remember the country h

Re: Wiener Coffee  •  August 6, 2004, 12:43pm  •  0 vote

All countries do that. "The Unites States" in French is "Les Etats Unis". The UK is "L'Angleterre". "Germany" in French is "L'Allemagne" while Germans call it "Deutchland". Switzerland in French is "L

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 11:53am  •  0 vote

And finally, I apologize to "blah" -- contrary to what I said, he did understand the situation and was going in the right direction; I was actually looking at Jun-Dai's message when commenting the fir

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 11:38am  •  0 vote

Other correct alternatives: "I don't envy the probable consequences you'll have to deal with." "I don't envy David's future frustration."

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 11:25am  •  0 vote

OK, here is the probably the solution to the conundrum: the verb "to envy" allows of two meanings (I quote from The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.  2000. -- htt

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 11:24am  •  0 vote

OK, here is the probably the solution to the conundrum: the verb "to envy" allows of two meanings (I quote from The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.  2000. -- htt

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 9:45am  •  0 vote

Now, to be more authoritative, I quote from a dictionary: "A woman does not envy a man for his fighting courage, nor a man a woman for her beauty. --Collier." http://dictionary.reference.com/sea

Re: Usage of “envy”  •  August 6, 2004, 9:21am  •  0 vote

No. Sorry, you're wrong. You can envy someone, not something. Hmm... wait a sec... well, you can actually say, "I envy your success". But not "I envy David his success". All right, I don't know how to

Re: Resume, resumé, or résumé?  •  August 6, 2004, 8:45am  •  3 votes

No more foreign, I meant.

Re: Resume, resumé, or résumé?  •  August 6, 2004, 8:44am  •  38 votes

The word is French. The original spelling is "résumé", and this is the preferred spelling in English as well. However, since no English keyboard has a key with "é" on it (I type it via Alt-130 now) it

Re: Pawshop  •  August 6, 2004, 8:35am  •  0 vote

Yes, a pawnshop is a commercial establishment where you can get a bit of cash quick by pledging something portable as a security; it's a place where you can get this kind of quick loan really. If you

Re: The Use of “Endeavored”  •  August 6, 2004, 8:29am  •  0 vote

To endeavor means "to intend to", "to set out to". "We endeavored to take Jane Doe to court for stalking", for example. So the usage you quote is incorrect, the phrase is meaningless.

Re: Computer Keyboard  •  August 6, 2004, 8:21am  •  0 vote

These are normal characters (not much used though.)