Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Stanmund

Member Since

March 9, 2011

Total number of comments

108

Total number of votes received

27

Bio

Latest Comments

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 2:55pm

@Ængelfolc

Thanks for that, so far, seems a good read, bookmarked it.

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 2:49pm

Ængelfolc wrote:

September 11, 2011, 1:39pm

Wine Press >> O.E. wīntredd(e)

Oil Press >> O.E. æl(e)tredd(e)

tredd(e)

I guess it's unkindred but minds me of the unoft (uncommon) English suffix -red as in 'hatred' - hate ruled(?)

Could the -red suffix still make a handy suffix in some way

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 2:11pm

Did any Frankish, Dutch and 'Calais English' wordstuff come into English out of the Pale of Calais (English Flanders) and 'French' Flanders?

That chunk of far northern France has been longer Dutch and maybe even English speaking than French speaking amongst the everyday folk.


http://books.google.com/books?id=H7VcdGI20FkC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Language+contact+at+the+Romance-Germanic+language+border++By+Roland+Willemyns&hl=en&ei=XSNtTunAHo6q8APv4tQS&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Language%20contact%20at%20the%20Romance-Germanic%20language%20border%20%20By%20Roland%20Willemyns&f=false

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_of_Calais

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 10:58am

'blurb' and 'bumf' are not fully the same in meaning as 'small print'

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 10:31am

'thrutch' seems to give off a more 'pressilike' feeling than 'thring'

mabe 'thrutch' straightforwardly for 'press' / 'print' (?) and 'smallhand' for 'small print' as it follows fittingly 'shorthand' and 'longhand' and has it stands, already slips off the tung eathly: 'always read the smallhand'

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 10:14am

@AnWulf

Ever heard of Kibbo Kift? seems highly likely that this olden movement (into its Saxon stuff) might of kept their own log of English wordbooks. Wondering if any Anglishers have ever bothered giving them a sniff over...


/office-holders such as the Tallykeeper, Campswarden, Ritesmaster and Gleeman/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kibbo_Kift

“Anglish”

  • September 11, 2011, 6:58am

Had not the inkling that the roots of 'empty' is English! Always snubbed it as being from Fr complet.

Got a full blast loathing for the influence of French on English, not even that keen on any Frankish by dint of French. I wonder how many so-called French Frankish words in English in fact found their way into English from the local Flemish and the following Anglo-Saxon settlers in 'French' Flanders. The whole of Nord pas de Calais and the strip of Picardy north of the Somme waterway, has always historically been so much longer Dutch and even English speaking than French. English folk don't know that the nearest bits of France have been speaking Dutch for way longer than French.

'French' Flanders, English Flanders, Elsass -Lotheringen, Brittany, Savoy, Nizza area, even bits of Monaco, Corsica, 'French' Catalanya, 'French' Basqueland, a lot of the rim of France is either recently annexed land or not truly Frenchified until after WW2.

French even made a grab to annex Saarland up until 1980s! Not forgetting the Frenchification of little old Andorra and the Frenchification of Dutch and German lands in Belgium and likewise German lands in Switzerland and Luxemburg. Sigh.

“Anglish”

  • September 10, 2011, 4:56pm

'what will be the morrow(s) of mankind'

Reckon almost all English speakers would here understand 'morrow' to mean 'future' Love how poetic licence is oft a good friend to the undertaking of Anglishing English.

'things will be better in the morrow'

Drift is still there but weakened

'in the morrow please take care'

?


'morrow' mighten be an head-on word for 'future' in old English but I am still up for using it over 'future' (when it allows)

little greenmen from a foremorrowlike world

“Anglish”

  • September 10, 2011, 3:53pm

@AnWulf...has u have shown, 'henchman' already works. Haven't the foggiest why I ran with 'henchland' It's ditched.

Would of liked better the Celtic 'vassal' to be spelt 'wassal' but nevermind.

'walhench' was meant as in: 'to hench for outsiders' - 'walh' (foreigner) It's ditched.

'outhench' same as above: (out sourcing) It's ditched.

Feel like sticking with 'hench up' for (beef up) and maybe even 'hench' for (beef) at least until something better comes along. Both work well enough in rightly meaning in my books. 'hench' is already out there on the streets doing a good'un wearing away at Latinates like: 'muscular' and 'imposing' so whilst it's at it, why not stick a word like 'beef' on its hitlist. It might sound full blast (extreme) but if it takes a bit of slang to grind down and away the usage of an oft Latinate like 'beef' sobeit.

On further thoughts, rather than 'cunhand' the word 'smallhand' for (small print) would fit better with the stuff out there already: shorthand, longhand and SMALL print. 'Always read the smallhand'

Maybe 'cunhand' could still overset some other Latinate out there.

“Anglish”

  • September 9, 2011, 8:04am

*henchman*


'America and its henchland the UK'

'henchland' - lackey/ axis state/ sattelite state/ allied state ?

'downhench'/'walhench'/'outhench' - something like: acting boldly in the interests other states?

'selfhench'/'freehench' - something like: to act boldly in ones own interests first rather than downhenching?

'hench' means 'well built' in slang, so forthwith 'beef up' is done and dusted for me. From now on it's 'hench up'

might even start wielding 'hench' as the name for 'beef'

- beefeaters get their name from the great big slabs of hench they are gotten fed by their overlords...

Anyway...

'for the next game we need to hench up our backrow or we art done for'