Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Stanmund

Member Since

March 9, 2011

Total number of comments

108

Total number of votes received

27

Bio

Latest Comments

“Anglish”

  • July 7, 2011, 5:38pm

flight 72011 making/on/in its final approach -

flight 72011 making/on/in its endcoming...(incoming/oncoming/homecoming) inending

flight 72011 making its flightsend ?

“Anglish”

  • July 7, 2011, 5:16pm

final approach -

-unloftingwards
-endlofting
-ongeardown
-endpath
-endlag
-endingdown
-flightpath
-endlandwarding
-enddownwarding
-drawdown
-endhaltward

“Anglish”

  • July 7, 2011, 4:37pm

here comes the bus
here arrives the bus

quick, the bus is coming/leaving!
quick, the bus is arriving/departing!

departure lounge - outwards room/hall/yard
departures - outwards
arrival lounge - inwards room/hall/yard
arrivals - inwards
arriving - alighting/endbounding

pickup -

dropoff -

outbound/outwards -

inbound/inwards -

shortstay -

longstay -

overnight -

stopover -

alights -

catch a connecting flight - catch an inlinker flight?

outgoing -

ongoing -

overwintering in the Canaries

oversummering in the Faeroes

take off -

landing -

“Anglish”

  • July 7, 2011, 4:02pm

The coach leaves Kenn (Somerset) at 8:15 and gets into Kippax (Yorkshire) at 15:45

“Anglish”

  • July 7, 2011, 3:52pm

jayles your examples are a taddish strawen. I think every day folk in Britain hardly ever find themselves saying 'due'

It would mostly be a straightforward:

'do you know when the next bus is mate/love/duck?'

or

'hi what time is the bus getting here?'

'hiya do you know when the next bus is?'

'hiya do you know when the 175 is getting here?'

'alright do you know what time the bus is coming/meant to get here?'

“Anglish”

  • July 5, 2011, 11:48am

Pathfinders listen up, shape a ring o hearth(?)

If 'o' = 'around'

then 'osheep' = 'around sheep'

could using 'o-' as a prefixlike thingy be useful for anything?

could a word be wrought for 'sourround' like: 'onknell' (sourround sound) /the hall onknelled allover in whistles and drums/ (?)

onbooms/oblooms = 'around blooms'

“Anglish”

  • July 5, 2011, 11:24am

Pathfinders listen up, shape a ring around the hearth...

a *ring* o' roses

and

*naughts* and crosses

and

Saturn's rings


instead of:


a circle o' roses

and

zeros and crosses

and indeed

Saturn's circles

“Anglish”

  • July 5, 2011, 11:06am

On a more businesslike take/knell/tip/heeding: it is spotlessly true that there is a snob worthiness in wielding latinate words. Thus work adverts house phrases like "able to work autonomously" - and other "buzz" words. So to middling learners I just untangle this as "on your own", which is near enough for that standing of learning. However at the skilled end the asking raised is what is the unlikeliness between both? and indeedly autonomously is closer to independently, and "on your own" might mean "alone". Now indeed one can come up with other stand-ins for autonomously, either utterly borrowed or just madeup or some backkindling of OE, but they are never going to have wholly the same feeling as the firsthand (Gk), for good or ill. Indeed todays English is strewn with the dregs of borrowings - wan/pale/pallid;
bloke/wight/man/homo/person; etc.; we just need to weed out the unneeded ones.

“Anglish”

  • June 1, 2011, 9:19pm

Ængelfolc: "Here are some old science words that were coined by Germanic speakers. They all spoke Germanic tongues, yet they chose to take from Latin and Greek to make these new words.

neuron, chromosome >> Heinrich Wilhelm Gottfried von Waldeyer-Hartz (German)

genetics >> William Bateson (English)

gene >> Wilhelm Johannsen (Danish)

biceps brachii >> Bernhard Weiss (German)

iris >> Jacob Winslow (Danish)

dinosaur >> Sir Richard Owen (English)

cell >> Robert Hooke (English)

histology >> August Meyer (German)

Unbelievable, right? Sadly, French/Latin/Greek were/are the tongues of woruldwīsdōm (science)"

Seems Jacob Winslow also even chose some French to go betwixt his gospelsome first name and his (utterlilike English looking) Danish last name. Though seeing has Winslow ended up in France, maybe it was an early example of the French bullying outsiders to frenchify their names.

Would it be wrong to say England have been the longest and biggest Romance fetishers - Nan Bullen to Anne Boleyn, Battenberg to Mountbatten rather than Battenburgh, Battenbury or Battenborough etc. Anyway, don't understand why this fashionista didn't go wholehog, drop the 'Winslow' bit, leaving: Jacques-Bénigne 'Guineslou'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_B._Winslow

......

/Jacob B. Winsløw, also known as Jacques-Bénigne Winslow, Danish-born anatomist (1669, Odense – 1760, Paris)/

/Winsløw greatly admired Bishop Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet, the famous preacher, and, as a consequence, he slightly changed his Danish Christian names to those of Bossuet/

“Anglish”

  • May 11, 2011, 11:48pm

How dose 'sideworking' 'cut it for: 'feature'

/the new 700ZX contains a number of sideworkings/

How about 'againafter' for: 'deja vu'

/it felt like a bit of againafter going on/

Anyone?