Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Stanmund

Member Since

March 9, 2011

Total number of comments

108

Total number of votes received

27

Bio

Latest Comments

“Anglish”

  • October 10, 2011, 2:50pm

@ AnWulf
i'm wondering now if 'teld' for 'tent' has anything to do with: (t)oldrums and t(e)ntrum?

doldrums
1811, from dulled, pp. of dullen, from O.E. dol "foolish, dull," ending perhaps patterned on tantrum.

tantrum
1714, originally colloquial, of unknown origin.

“Anglish”

  • October 9, 2011, 5:02am

Allhallown
a.1.Of or pertaining to the time of Allhallows. [Obs.] "Allhallown summer." Shak. (i. e., late summer; "Indian Summer").

“Anglish”

  • September 25, 2011, 5:12am

So that's where the English match for German 'Herr' lies. thesaurus.com doesn't seem to list 'hoar(y)' as a synonym under 'venerable'


hoar (adj.)
O.E. har "hoary, gray, venerable, old," the connecting notion being gray hair, from P.Gmc. *haira (cf. O.N. harr "gray-haired, old," O.S., O.H.G. her "distinguished, noble, glorious," Ger. hehr), from PIE *kei-, source of color adjectives (see hue (1)). German also uses the word as a title of respect, in Herr. Of frost, it is recorded in O.E., perhaps expressing the resemblance of the white feathers of frost to an old man's beard. Used as an attribute of boundary stones in Anglo-Saxon, perhaps in reference to being gray with lichens, hence its appearance in place-names.


/his hoariness Herr Einstein is highly hoaried/

“Anglish”

  • September 24, 2011, 6:06pm

I think Anglishers owe it to Bēda Venerābilis aka Venerable Bede to wield an English overset for 'Venerable' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bede

....

Father Bede

Wiseful Bede

Worshipful Bede

Wiseworn Bede

Worshipworthy Bede

Trusted Bede

Bewisened Bede

High standing Bede

Betrusted Bede

Highlied Bede

Father Bede

?

“Anglish”

  • September 21, 2011, 6:01am

forebearers
forerunners
longfathers


house
roots
stock
stem
stalk
blood
birth

kind
kinsmen
kindred
household
strain
network

begetter

older
firstborn
oldest

“Anglish”

  • September 15, 2011, 4:29am

ex skoose sem wah

*unmanned*

“Anglish”

  • September 15, 2011, 4:27am

@AnWulf

You're into your Sci-fi stuf, clocked the new Apollo 19 film has the wordset in it:

"up there in the *unmaned*"

“Anglish”

  • September 15, 2011, 4:13am

At my old inner city state school the classes from the same year were cleft into a pecking ladder. At the top stood 'Campion' in the middle sat 'Houghton' (hoo/high/hill and town) schoolboys deemed to have the least skill/hope were heaped into 'Rigsby' form. Like this until the school was shutdown in the in the 1990s.

Top, middle, and lowest rungs:

Norman
Saxon
Norse

“Anglish”

  • September 15, 2011, 3:48am

when it comes to homing oneself, 'upping sticks' is out there as a meaning of 'moving' house/home/location

jayle's from your teachings, your English learners would have an understanding of the word 'apostasy' unlike most British folk. The only boast about my lack of English skills on here, is that it is nearer to that of most everyday English speaking folk, hence I had not the weest drift of what the Latinate 'apostasy' meant. At least the most unknown and makeshift of Germanic English can more oft than not be worked out by the nation's teeming millions of Athelunwellreads.