Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

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Stanmund

Member Since

March 9, 2011

Total number of comments

108

Total number of votes received

29

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Latest Comments

“Anglish”

  • December 1, 2011, 8:04am

edischenn: Game-bird

ediscweard: Pasture/pasturage

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=rwLYx4gYfr0C&pg=PA910&lpg=PA910&dq=ediscweard&source=bl&ots=fvOByXNTnx&sig=AXcKaEjzGSXBG03rR9a3WGysFaY&hl=en&ei=3aLXTuSPHYK18QPY3Y3xDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=ediscweard&f=false

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00138389708599099

/arable-hen'. Erse and edisc have different etymologies but are in complementary distribution as substantive elements in charter boundaries (Kitson, forth- .../


Old English ersc (stubble field)
http://www.jstor.org/pss/457998

“Anglish”

  • December 1, 2011, 7:30am

Almost forgot, there's also some Middle English stuff about edible hens...

edish-henne (n.) Also ediscine. [ OE edisc-hen(n; cp. edisc pasture, park.] A quail

'a quail' ?

“Anglish”

  • December 1, 2011, 7:18am

Back outta hiding and wondering if either 'eddish' http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/eddish or 'earsh' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earsh are good to go for 'arable' (?) and if also, how akin the aforesaid words are to: 'hurst' 'ash' and 'earth'

Anyway, gotta be something better out there to go alongside the Anglish Moot's 'plow(able)' for 'arable'

“Anglish”

  • October 17, 2011, 9:05pm

*welsh = foreigner/Briton/Welsman/Latin/unGermanic etc...*

/Bead is well read in Latin and his underling is walestod in the understooding of matters Celtic.../

“Anglish”

  • October 17, 2011, 8:47pm

SPREAD THE WORD: woodwose / wahlstod / sinflood


'woodwose' - (faun)

If needed, could someone kindly eke 'woodwose' as the bypell for 'faun' on Anglish Moot /The wild man (also wildman, or "wildman of the woods", archaically woodwose or wodewose/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_man

Believed from Old English: 'wudu-wása' also lives in sundry lastnames like: wodehouse, woodhouse, woodiwiss, wudwas, and so forth...http://www.archive.org/stream/surnames00week/surnames00week_djvu.txt

It's not enough that there is already stuff like greenman, wildman and suchlike, the '-wose' ending is bewitching and one-of-a-kind. 'wodwos' in Gawain and the Green night, and 'the woses' in Tolkien's LOTR. Tinkered on More Words http://www.morewords.com/ but doesn't seem any kindred wordstuff for the 'wose' bit. There's the near-ago slang word 'wuss' but even if it's got roots in a warm furry thing, the whimp+pussy/effeminate man meaning seems most unwoodwoseilike. That seems to leave 'woozy' (feeling oozy from drink) and 'woosie' a kind of pet form/call said to sweet furry cats. Anyway, maybe our furry friends the woodwoses might also have kin in moorlands called: moorwose/moorwiss - maybe that's how the 'morris dancers' got their name (?)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_man


'wahlstod' - (interpreter)

Said to be Old English for 'interpreter' makes sense as 'wahlstod' (welshstood / welsh-understander?) also seems to of gone on to be the name of a mate/manthrall/interpreter(?) of Hallowed Bead. Haps back then 'wahlstod' meant: the Welsh understood/stander, and Saint Dunstan: the Dane understood/stander?
Dunstand / Walstood
Dunstod /Walstan
Anyway, what would be the spelling of 'wahlstod' ( interpreter) in English now days?

http://wotanselvishmusings.blogspot.com/2011/10/be-very-quiet-i-am-hunting-tolkienian.html


'sinflood' - (appocaplyspe)? (or as a prefix i.e sinbless, sinbliss, sinsinge, sincindersinge)?

'sündflut' German word for 'deluge' 'biblical flood' the meaningness of the word 'sinflood' gets broken down here: http://www.archive.org/stream/significantetymo00mitcuoft/significantetymo00mitcuoft_djvu.txt and here: http://www.myhistorybooks.org/categories.php?categoryno=20900&pageno=57 and how here: http://books.google.com/books?id=8vqm1zozD18C&pg=PA183&lpg=PA183&dq=%22sin+flood%22+etymology&source=bl&ots=JA9gov4649&sig=1g6Ahi_SDn2zmHmV6md9Fhnocuk&hl=en&ei=n9ycTv2NE5S28QPtvrGbCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CCMQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22sin%20flood%22%20etymology&f=false how 'sündflut' is a mismeaning from a German dance hight 'sint-vluot'

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sintflut

“Anglish”

  • October 10, 2011, 5:16pm

from the thrill of the battlefield to the doldrums of the field hospital

“Anglish”

  • October 10, 2011, 5:10pm

'in the doldrums'

'IN the doldrums'

'IN'...

'IN' the tent'

'IN' the ROOMS'

'IN' the teldRUMS'

'IN' a tantrum'

'IN' the tent rooms'

'IN' the doldrums'

How is Johnny Longbow? ..well he was once a mighty warrior but took a hit and ended up broken in a field hospital tent room (teld rum)...so has you can imagine he's a bit in the doldrums...

“Anglish”

  • October 10, 2011, 4:46pm

Florence Nightingale dulls wounds in teld rooms

nightingale yells dulls wounded yells

“Anglish”

  • October 10, 2011, 4:29pm

/the sharpest longbowmen from the day were kinded a good nights wink in teld rooms/ ?

/after the heat of battle a good bowman is an even better bowman after the still/dull (silence) of teld rooms (doldrums)/ ?

/camping in a tent is wonderful, but camping in a tent through a day of rain can leave those that dwell inside in the doldrums, hence all the mobilehomes, caravans and chalets rather then tents on many so-called campsites these days.../ ?

/when bad weather hits small tented rooms (tents) the doldrums (teld rooms) hit those inside/ ?