Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

jayles

Member Since

August 12, 2010

Total number of comments

748

Total number of votes received

183

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Latest Comments

gifting vs. giving a gift

  • December 14, 2017, 11:03pm

More examples, some using "gifted" as an adjective, but some using "gifted" as part of a passive verb.

On Tomorrow

  • November 9, 2017, 7:25pm

@ Chrissy

Since you are college educated at least get the facts straight:

http://random-idea-english.blogspot.co.nz/2014/01/random-thoughts-about-on-tomorrow.html

Impact as a noun

  • October 1, 2017, 9:04am

However "impacted" as an adjective seems to retain its original physical meaning:

http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=%22impacted%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en&dcr=0&gbv=1&sei=f67QWfamMsf_8gXuo6rQDA

@HS There is a long article on "wh" here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pronunciation_of_English_%E2%9F%A8wh%E2%9F%A9

I do remember being taught to pronounce "whether" as "hwether" at primary school in the 1950's ( SE England) ; but when I started work, I dropped it as being too affected and snobby. Technically though, "wh" is a digraph like "th" and "ch" and "ph".

@AC That seems about right; but perhaps someone will come up with an exception. Maybe I am wrong here, but are there not dialects (perhaps Somerset?) where there is some kind of an "r" sound (non-trilled) at the end of a word?