Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

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Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

“independence from” or “independence to”?

I have a feeling I’ll look at this again in a while and find the answer screamingly obvious. Do these parallel the form of “independent” exactly? As “independence of” seems really wrong, though “independent of” seems ok. I’m confused.

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"Independence from."

Erin1 May-27-2009

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+1

brian.wren.ctr May-27-2009

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"independence of": John declares the independence of John Republic.

"independence from": The union, though weak and poor, managed to remain their independence from other big, influential interest groups.

Can you sense the difference there?

monkey May-27-2009

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Regarding: "The union, though weak and poor, managed to remain their independence from other big, influential interest groups."

This isn't quite right. I would suggest that it should be either "...maintained their independence from..." or "...remained independent from..."

porsche May-27-2009

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Oops, wrong tense. That's ...maintain...remain..., no "-ed" at the end.

porsche May-27-2009

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1) Argentina gained independence from Spain in 1816. (New Oxford American Dictionary, 2nd Edition. © 2005 by Oxford University Press, Inc.)

2) independence of irrelevant alternatives; independence of random variables

mykhailo Jun-06-2009

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independence FROM {named object}
independence OF {subject}, no named object that subject is independent from; general idea of independence meant.
Or as the irregular verb bashers would have it, "meaned." (joke)

Stan1 Jul-24-2009

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also
The union, though weak and poor, managed to remain their

1- remain may be a typo for RETAIN?
2- THEIR is not allowable here since it is not the union and something else, e.g. the army. Therefore THEIR must be ITS to match the singular subject.

Steve1 Dec-14-2009

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