Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

Username

mykhailo

Member Since

January 30, 2009

Total number of comments

20

Total number of votes received

110

Bio

Latest Comments

Comparisons and Superlatives of Colours

  • September 21, 2010, 3:15pm

I guess comparisons and superlatives for more colours are possible in literary writing.

"bourgeois" seems to cover I, O, R :)

One of the most...

  • June 6, 2009, 6:28pm

People,

If you don't like "one of the most", what will you say about "a most"?

:)

1) Argentina gained independence from Spain in 1816. (New Oxford American Dictionary, 2nd Edition. © 2005 by Oxford University Press, Inc.)

2) independence of irrelevant alternatives; independence of random variables

Someone else’s

  • June 6, 2009, 6:18pm

Yes, "someone else's" and "passers-by" is correct.

There's nothing to add to yello.cape.cod's explanation. ;)

Just one more thing:
Whose: mother-in-law's

Infinitive without “to”

  • May 24, 2009, 8:51am

we call them modal verbs.

Computer mouses or computer mice?

  • May 19, 2009, 1:13pm

New Oxford American Dictionary, 2nd Edition. © 2005 by Oxford University Press:

(pl. also mouses) Computing a small hand-held device that is dragged across a flat surface to move the cursor on a computer screen, typically having buttons that are pressed to control computer functions

I guess it's OK if we distinguish the rodents and devices grammatically :)

This is one of his, girlfriends! ;)

One of the most...

  • May 19, 2009, 9:40am

I don't see anything wrong about one of the most ..., one of the best, etc.

Peter thins them out

  • May 19, 2009, 9:35am

Yes, I agree it's a metaphor, child's play or imagination is meant, IMO :)