Jeremy Wheeler

Joined: December 8, 2011

Number of comments posted: 42

Number of votes received: 66

No user description provided.

Recent Comments

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 8, 2013, 8:36am  •  0 vote

It strikes me that Anwulf is attempting to do what a well-known English demonstrated was not possible, namely, hold back the tide. But then, Anwulf has always struck me as a bit of a Cnut.

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 14, 2012, 11:06pm  •  0 vote

Good to hear from Dale A Wood. Dale, are you the same Dale A Wood who has degrees from Auburn, Georgia Tech, and the University of Alabama, who used to be with the Department of Technology at Northern

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  November 19, 2012, 3:31pm  •  0 vote

I don't understand why you can't use your mentality.

Re: Someone else’s  •  November 15, 2012, 10:45am  •  1 vote

"General consensus" is not a redundancy, surely? It is specifying a consensus generally, as opposed to a consensus of a narrow class.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 28, 2012, 4:09pm  •  0 vote

Still waiting to hear from Dale A Wood on whether he is the same Dale A Wood who has degrees from Auburn, Georgia Tech, and the University of Alabama, who used to be with the Department of Technology

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 20, 2012, 12:46am  •  0 vote

Response to "Captain Mannering-ism": shouldn't that be "Mainwaring-ism?

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  August 20, 2012, 12:41am  •  0 vote

I'm with you on this, Warsaw Will. If you replace the pronoun with the noun phrase it is obviously "is": "There are all sorts of things I believed in then which I don’t believe in now, and language ru

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  August 14, 2012, 9:24am  •  0 vote

"Clarke lived about 15 years longer, and he was fascinated by the Internet, and he had Internet computers right in his own home on the island of Ceylon" It might have been Ceylon when Clarke moved the

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 14, 2012, 12:06am  •  0 vote

Still waiting to hear from Dale A Wood on whether he is the same Dale A Wood who has degrees from Auburn, Georgia Tech, and the University of Alabama, who used to be with the Department of Technology

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 13, 2012, 4:00pm  •  1 vote

Hurray for Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, I say. An excellent book. I do find disputes about US versus British English tiresome. As said above, good for the Americans. Many so-called A

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 4:52pm  •  0 vote

DA Wood, you say: "Wheeler, you have no idea what having a graduate degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology means, and another graduate dergree in mathematics from the University of Alabama a

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 4:41pm  •  0 vote

There's an old story about the captains of a US Navy ship and a Royal Navy ship arguing. "If it wasn't for us," says the American captain, "you'd all be speaking German." Quite possibly," says the Bri

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 12:47am  •  1 vote

DAW is one of those internet users whose watchword is, "You might have a PhD but I have read an article on Wikipedia." He seems harmless enough, though a tad irritating at times. I can't, I have to sa

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 6:41am  •  1 vote

Another DA Wood line: "People have laughed at me..." Surely not!

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 6:38am  •  1 vote

On "thus" versus "thusly": although for many people the longer form is unnecessary, and its use seems to have originated as a kind of joke, many people do use it without irony. My question is this: do

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 10:34am  •  1 vote

I didn't say that his father's nationality was relevant. I merely quoted their Lordships in the House of Lords appeal. I suspect that they are all dead now so it won't be possible for you to take the

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 8:48am  •  1 vote

You really shuld check your facts. William Joyce (Lord Haw Haw) was not an Canadian. He was, in fact, an American citizen who falsely obtained a British passport. Here is the opening of the judgment o

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 1:29am  •  0 vote

Re Canada and treason. I think you need to look up the difference bwtween British citizen and British subject.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 11:36pm  •  0 vote

Yes, I am saying that the Supreme Court (formerly the House of Lords) cannot strike down laws for unconstitutionality. When the Human Rights Act was introduced it included a section allowing courts to

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 2, 2012, 12:26pm  •  2 votes

Not that it should matter, but since you ask, I received my law degree from London Metropolitan University. I think you are a bit confused about how the English legal system works and, I would imag

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 1, 2012, 10:32pm  •  2 votes

Re-reading your rather confused comments I see that you have made some other errors, the most obvious of which are: 1. "There are also millions of British People (and proud of it) who live in North

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 1, 2012, 11:07am  •  2 votes

I'm not sure why you presume that I don't know the constitution and laws of my own country. Scottish law and English law are two separate legal systems (and always have been) and Northern Ireland has

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 29, 2012, 11:46am  •  2 votes

As always you miss (deliberately?) my point. NORAD is concerned with threats to the US and Canada, primarily, and my point was about its role in dealing with an attack on a sovereign state whose head

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 29, 2012, 12:25am  •  0 vote

I hope that NORAD would check with the Bahamas' head of state (Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II) before doing any bombing...

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 28, 2012, 12:21pm  •  0 vote

Bomb: a hollow projectile containing explosive, incendiary, or other destructive substance. I'm guessing that as you don't seem to agree with this definition that you think that a smoke bomb is sla

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 11:56am  •  1 vote

Also, there is no such thing as 'British Law'. We do have English law (which is the law of England and Wales), Scottish law (the law of Scotland) and Northern Irish law (the law of Northern Ireland),

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 11:52am  •  1 vote

Clearly you don't know the difference between Great Britain and the United Kindom.

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  July 25, 2012, 3:43pm  •  0 vote

Yet another howler from DA Wood: "One of the trios was supposed to be few, less, least." Really? Wouldn't that be either "few, fewer, fewest" or "less, lesser , least"? What can you do with a man

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  July 25, 2012, 3:35pm  •  0 vote

Another amusing nonsense from good old DA Wood. He claims you are either ready or not ready AND that the English of John Locke is the same as the English of today. Here is a quote (with original ortho

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  July 25, 2012, 3:19pm  •  0 vote

DA Wood, always ready with a nonsense statement to amuse us, says: "Language is NOT always evolving and changing -- because if so the writings of Chaucer, Shakespeare, John Locke, David Hume, Thomas J

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 2:43pm  •  2 votes

By all means ignore my comments. No doubt others will be happy to read them and decide for themselves whether I am right in calling you out on some of the absurd and untrue things you say.

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 25, 2012, 2:34pm  •  0 vote

Tangents? Not at all. I merely quoted your assertion and disproved it with a website link. I notice that you have ignored it.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 8:48am  •  2 votes

On the separate issue of nouns as adjectives, what adjectives would you use to replace these? car door, clothes shop, race horse, accounts department, arms production, research centre, team coach, fo

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 8:41am  •  1 vote

(Oh, please note that on this very page there is reference to "oldest" and "latest" comments...)

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 8:40am  •  2 votes

I wonder what "US" functions as when used (as often in the US press) in such forms as "US troops", "US Navy", "US elections", "US border", and so on. I prefer the use of US rather than "American" becu

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 25, 2012, 8:32am  •  0 vote

Doh.... there you go again, making wild assertions: "the concept of a "car park" is completely unknown in North America." Along with confusing "US" and "America", and now "North America", you seem

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 24, 2012, 9:03am  •  0 vote

25 references to "petrol bomb" in the New York Times, 31 in the Washington Post. Perhaps Americans are better educated than you assume.

Re: changed history  •  July 24, 2012, 8:47am  •  5 votes

You seem to be using a rather narrow definition of history here. As a discipline it can change, as can the narration of past events.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 24, 2012, 8:45am  •  2 votes

I really wonder where people get their ideas from. "Latest", meaning "most recent" or "newest", is well attested in US English. On the other hand, the meaning "deadest" is not (nor, as far as I know,

Re: “enamored with” and “enamored by”  •  December 8, 2011, 5:50pm  •  21 votes

In answer to your question, did I read your prior posts, yes I did. In particular I noted two assertions you made: ‘There was a time when "of' was the only acceptable preposition to use with "enamored

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  December 8, 2011, 4:18pm  •  0 vote

evath has, I notice, committed the blunder so many do when pointlessly trying to avoid prepositions at the end of clauses and sentences. She says: "as in that last bit, which is an example of which we

Re: “enamored with” and “enamored by”  •  December 8, 2011, 3:34pm  •  14 votes

Why don't people check their facts before spouting such drivel? The simplest Google books search shows that all three forms have been in use since at least the 19th century. M-WDEU records all three,