D. A. Wood

Joined: November 7, 2011

Number of comments posted: 258

Number of votes received: 35

No user description provided.

Questions Submitted

Latest vs. Newest

Molotov Cocktails

“Much More Ready”

Recent Comments

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 27, 2013, 1:25pm  •  0 vote

Something that happens "right now" happens at any instant of time that you care to choose, within reason. The earth orbits the sun right now. Pure water tastes good right now. The Eiffel Tower

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 27, 2013, 1:16pm  •  0 vote

Dear Philistine: I have had BRITISH people tell me that the phrase "the government are", such as is used by cheap tabloids and magazines there, STINKS TO HIGH HEAVEN. Of course, in North America

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 27, 2013, 1:06pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will Warsaw Will says: @D.A.W. - I don't see why are you are still going on about a building sitting or standing somewhere; I have absolutely no problem with that. I do not like people m

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 26, 2013, 12:51pm  •  0 vote

To Warsaw Will: You do not understand how newspapers operate in the large cities of the United States and Canada. Here, a large newspaper does not have just one Editor, but rather it has many edit

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 26, 2013, 12:31pm  •  0 vote

To: Warsaw Will: "It does so right now" would have been ungrammatical. Quite to the contrary: "It does so right now" is perfectly good English, at least in North America, where over 300,000,000 Eng

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 26, 2013, 12:08pm  •  0 vote

Warsaw Will: I have a hard time understanding that the statue of Abraham Lincoln sits in Washington, D.C., because it sits in a chair, just as I sit in a chair as I write this. What is so hard about t

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 25, 2013, 12:54pm  •  0 vote

I don't need a grammar book in English because my mother was a professional teacher of American English for several decades. I learned from her. You are arguing concerning that twisted mess called

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  February 24, 2013, 6:25pm  •  0 vote

Oh, Warsaw Will, I agree with you emphatically. "With all but a monumental collapse now standing between...." is truly horrid English. Actually, it isn't even English, but rather it is gibberish.

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 2:14pm  •  0 vote

Oh, we love SPECTRE. We watch James Bond OO7 movies on TV and at the movie houses all the time. These are my favorites: "The Spy Who Loved Me", "Moonraker", "Octopussy", and "Never Say Never Agai

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 2:09pm  •  0 vote

In the United States, we went straight from the word "airfield" to "airport" w/o even considering the wacky word "aerodrome". The original meaning of "airfield" was an open piece of land covered b

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 1:26pm  •  0 vote

"Many hammer all over the wall and believe that with each blow they hit the nail on the head." (Translated from German.) Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749 - 1832), German poet, dramatist, and sci

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 1:24pm  •  0 vote

I know that Asimov used the words "psychohistorian" and "encyclopedian", and he probably invented them, and he definitely used "robotics" before anyone else did. Asimov said that he thought that this

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 1:11pm  •  0 vote

From www.dictionary,reference.com Contrarian - a person who takes an opposing view, especially one who rejects the majority opinion. Year of origin - as in "first seen in print" - 1963. I could

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 12:40pm  •  0 vote

"Contraian" is a word that I have seen in novels, and especially in science-fiction novels, so I did not invent it. Now I need to look it up in a good dictionary and find out if it is listed there, an

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 18, 2012, 12:38pm  •  0 vote

The original vacuum tube amplifiers used triodes, tubes with three electrical terminals, invented by the American Lee De Forest in 1906. Three terminals (or more) are necessary to make an amplifier.

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 15, 2012, 2:56pm  •  0 vote

It is true that: 1. Americans speak an older version of English than British people do. 2. French Canadians speak an older version of French than people in France do. 3. Hispanics in South Americ

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 15, 2012, 8:26am  •  0 vote

"A few mashed potatoes" means that Mrs. Jones looked into her pantry and her root cellar and she found only two, three, or four potatoes, so she boiled them, mashed them, and fed them to her family an

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 15, 2012, 4:49am  •  0 vote

Sorry for my misspellings: I have trouble getting "Chomsky" spelled right all the time. I do a lot better with Marvin Minsky, another retired professor from M.I.T. who made remarkable processes in the

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 15, 2012, 4:35am  •  0 vote

Yes, Jeremy, this is me, the Dale Wood of Auburn, Georgia Tech, and the University of Alabama. As for published papers, those are few: I had an interesting experience while I was working at Northern I

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 14, 2012, 6:50pm  •  0 vote

Someone has disagreed and insisted that the language ALWAYS changes. This is untrue because the changes in the language only come in small amounts that occcur only now and then (occasionally). In ot

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 14, 2012, 6:10pm  •  0 vote

Someone diagreed with the affirmative, comparative, and superlative trio ot few, less, least. I will show you an example taken from wartime in England when foodstuffs were hard to get. 1. Mrs. Jone

Re: “Much More Ready”  •  December 14, 2012, 6:01pm  •  0 vote

@tdcherry: That is beside the point. Bertrand Russell was clearly writing about shaving faces, and not about shaving anything else. We can see that from the point that Russell wrote about the kinds

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  October 16, 2012, 2:01pm  •  0 vote

Thank you, Warsaw Will, Yes, all of these are quite correct: American English, American Literature, American Embassy, American Consulate, American Airlines, American Language, American Medical Ass

Re: Resume, resumé, or résumé?  •  September 28, 2012, 7:36am  •  0 vote

Résumé contains letters that are not in the English alphabet. You might not believe it, but these all differ somewhat: the alphabets in English, French, German (with the umlauts), the Nordic languag

Re: Abbreviation of “number”  •  September 28, 2012, 7:23am  •  0 vote

We often just use the number sign # in North America. Why not?

Re: -ic vs -ical  •  September 28, 2012, 7:21am  •  0 vote

In the study of electricity, the words "electric" and "electrical" are often completely interchangeable. Otherwise, sometimes one of these is customary to use, e.g. "electrical engineer" and "electri

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 28, 2012, 7:14am  •  0 vote

You don't get it about the common rules of grammar among the Indo-European languages: Singular vs. plural: nouns and pronouns. Tenses of verbs: past, present, future, past perfect, present perfect,

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 4:49pm  •  0 vote

So you are unable to recognize the existence of language families and you refuse to acknowledge their existence? How quaint! You are also unwilling to concede anything towards ease of translation fro

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 9:50am  •  0 vote

As I have mentioned before, English does not exist in a vacuum, entirely free to make up its own rules as it goes along. English is a member of the Indo-European family of languages, and English gram

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 4:10am  •  0 vote

“Your teenagers are more at risk while on their restricted licences.”? Now, let's drop that unnecessary word "your". “Teenagers are more at risk while (driving?) on their restricted licences.”?

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 3:41am  •  0 vote

Going back to the original line at the top of this section: “Your teen is more at risk while on their restricted licence.” Why not “Your teenagers are more at risk while on their restricted licences

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 3:37am  •  0 vote

These has been heard many times from news and "public affairs" TV programs in the U.S.A.: "Your child .... them...." and "Your child .... their...." The speakers were supposed to be college-educated

Re: Pronouncing “mandatory”  •  September 26, 2012, 4:41pm  •  0 vote

Hello: In American dictionaries, in the pronunciations, there is often a primary stress marked on one syllable and then a secondary stress marked on another syllable - usually later on in the wor

Re: Pronouncing “mandatory”  •  September 26, 2012, 4:37pm  •  0 vote

There are many people, including foreigners and not, who do not understand how English "slides" letters from one syllable to another when forming compound words and when adding suffixes and prefixes.

Re: Pronouncing “mandatory”  •  September 26, 2012, 3:48pm  •  0 vote

Hello: I agree that the word "mandate" usually has equal stresses on its two syllables, as unusual at that is in English. However, it might make a difference depending on whether: 1. Mandate is

Re: Pronouncing “mandatory”  •  September 25, 2012, 11:17am  •  0 vote

It is really reh-gu-la-tor-ee, with no particulatory emphasis on any syllable that I can perceive. An example of its use: The FCC is the regulatory agency for telecommunications in the United States.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 2:17pm  •  0 vote

How many hundreds of dictionaries have you read?

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 2:14pm  •  0 vote

"Ensure" is never used in American English. It is considered to be one of those British peculiarities, just like the Brit. Eng. words "flat", "boot", "bonnet", "gearbox", and "Cheerio!" D.A.W.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 2:04pm  •  0 vote

You people of the British Isles forget so easily that if you hadn't had a HUGE (and I mean HUGE) amount of help from the Americans and the Canadians, you would still have jack-booted Nazis marching yo

Re: On Tomorrow  •  August 12, 2012, 1:40pm  •  0 vote

A comment from above: "I'll return this report to you on tomorrow." Adverbs can not be the object of a preposition. Your problem is that in English "tomorrow" is either noun or an adverb. See thi

Re: Complete Sentence  •  August 12, 2012, 12:51pm  •  1 vote

To some of you above: Verbs either express actions or states of existence. Here are some short once that I can think of that express states of existence: "I am", "I care", "I have" ("I possess").

Re: Complete Sentence  •  August 12, 2012, 12:35pm  •  0 vote

LOL, Porsche, this one of yours has a pleasant connotation: "I took a moment to do some F-ing in the middle of the night." Oh, well, crude American expletives for you.... D.A.W.

Re: Complete Sentence  •  August 12, 2012, 12:31pm  •  0 vote

This one is probably one word too long, but at dinnertime, my favorite word is "eat!". Also, the sentence "I am." is found in the Book of Exodus of the KIng James Bible. Do you recall this? D.A.

Re: Complete Sentence  •  August 12, 2012, 12:28pm  •  0 vote

LOL, Porsche, "F-ing" is an abbreviation of a dirty American expletive. Do people on the other sides of the oceans use it, too? I have little doubt that it is used by certain Canadians because wh

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 12:16pm  •  0 vote

If you don't like any of the pages that I submitted, such as this one and the one on Molotov Cocktails, there is a quite simple answer to that problem. Do not read them! Do not write anything on them

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 11:56am  •  0 vote

Wheeler, you have no idea what having a graduate degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology means, and another graduate dergree in mathematics from the University of Alabama at Huntsville means,

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 12:36am  •  0 vote

Correction: beyond

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 12:35am  •  0 vote

@Jasper There is a very simple solution foy you: if you don't want to learn anything new, then don't read it. Very simple - skip it and don't gripe about it. Analytical reasoning is beyong you. I

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 12:00am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will To say that you use a nouns as a adjecive is self-contradictory. That cannot be done. A noun is a noun and an adjective is an adjective. The process is more complcated than you imagi

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 11:41pm  •  0 vote

"Well I've never heard anybody use 'chose' for 'chosen'," @Warsaw Will Then you may count yourself as fortunate. Just say a prayer of thanksgiving. I certainly have heard it, and I didn't lik

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 11:35pm  •  0 vote

@Jeremy: When you quote something, YOU are responsible for what it says: "I didn't say that his father's nationality was relevant. I merely quoted their Lordships in the House of Lords appeal. I sus

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 11:26pm  •  0 vote

Furthermore, the Associated Press has its headquarters in New York City. I do not want articles that are written in Kenyan English, New Zealand English, Irish English, Hoing Kong English, South Afri

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 11:20pm  •  0 vote

"And who are these so-called 'lazy dog writers' who confuse England with English etc, Can you provide any examples." I am sorry that you didn't get the gist of what I was writing. That was "We're

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 10, 2012, 10:12pm  •  0 vote

I do not think that anyone else has written anything here about the use of the subjunctive mood to express that elements of doubt in statements, questions, commands, etc. Yes, it truly is used this

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 10, 2012, 9:53pm  •  0 vote

"A Student's Introduction to English Grammar" by Huddleston and Pullum describes three uses for the past tense: 3 backshift in indirect reported speech: I told Stacey that Kim had (instead of has) bl

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 10, 2012, 9:46pm  •  0 vote

Brus, from the study of German we come to realize that in the following sentence of yours, the addition of the VERB "would" is just an element of politeness: "I would prefer that you don't come w

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 10, 2012, 9:26pm  •  0 vote

Oops - I used incorrect word order. One of my example sentences should have been: "Ich moechte Wiener schnitzel, Kartoffelen und Apfelsafte gern haben." "I would like to have Wiener schnitzel, pot

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 10, 2012, 9:20pm  •  0 vote

In German, the subjunctive mood is alive and well, and people use it every day. I have few doubts that thsi is also true of other languages of Mainland Europe. Hence, people who are accustomed top

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 10:07am  •  0 vote

Jeremy, you have a way of making things EVEN WORSE when you ought to be silent. For the British to execute an American is EVEN WORSE than executing a Canadian. Why didn't you just shut up about it

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 8:31am  •  0 vote

Dates of Independence from the U.K. for selected places in the Americas: BELIZE rather recenlty celebrated the 31st anniversary of its independece on Sept. 21, 1981 Guyana - Independent on May 2

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 8:07am  •  0 vote

Once again, Jeremy, you make comments that are beside the point. Just read up on the characrter called "Lord Haw Haw" who made hundreds of propaganda broadcasts to Britain for Nazi Germany. Grante

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 10, 2012, 12:20am  •  0 vote

You need to check again. Belize has been an independent country for a long time now, just as Guyana and Trinidad have been. I also said to exclude all independent countries - e.g. Canada. South Ge

Re: “all but” - I hate that expression!  •  August 9, 2012, 11:11pm  •  0 vote

To: Rich: As we know, "Almost finished" and "Not finished" have nearly opposing definitions, therefore proving the construction "all but..." to be terrible! ----------------------------------------

Re: Titled vs. Entitled  •  August 9, 2012, 10:57pm  •  0 vote

Once again, we see the case of a longer word taking the place of a shorter word that does make sense and is unambiguous. As Dr. McCoy said to Commander Spock, "Where is the logic in that?" Perso

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 10:32pm  •  0 vote

The small, metallic pyramidical cap on the very top of the Washington Monument was made of aluminum back in the years before that metal could be make by the Hall - Herout process (invented in 1886). T

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 10:20pm  •  0 vote

According to the IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry), the official spelling of SULFUR is as I have just spelled it. Likewise: "sulfuric acid", "hydrogen sulfide", "sulfur and d

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 10:13pm  •  0 vote

Oops, DISCOVERY -- which was also the name of the huge spaceship in 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY. D.A.W.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 10:07pm  •  0 vote

Speaking of astronauts, the famous American astronaut Sally Ride has recently died of abdominal cancer. She was only in her early 60s, too. Dr. Ride was the first American woman to take a flight i

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 9:52pm  •  0 vote

We have places in the U,S,A, with quite similar names, but a little bit different, such as Middleborough, Massachusetts, and Middlesborough, Kentucky. So, perhaps England has Farnborough and Farnsbor

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 9:47pm  •  0 vote

Hi, there, Les, Please do look up "Middlesbrough" in www.Wikipedia.org . Then, given the right kind of software, there is a place near the top of the page where you can click and it will give you

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 8:55pm  •  0 vote

So, are you telling me that the people who live on Sark and some of the other Channel Islands are NOT British? Even if their soverign is Queen Elizabeth II ? ("Sark" is one of my favorite place n

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 8:09pm  •  0 vote

There is a highway tunnel underneath the Detroit River that connects Windsor, Ontario, with Detroit Michigan. That tunnel has an unusual distinction. It is the: only highway tunnel in the world, th

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 7:56pm  •  0 vote

American and proud of it ! American spellings and proud of them: aluminum, analyze, be gone, favor, gotten, harbor, math, neighbor, parlor, vapor.... By the way, the AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY is spe

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 7:28pm  •  0 vote

Oh, flogging: ENRON Corp, executives, sub-prime perpetrators, Jimmy Swaggart, former president GWB, and Senators from Kentucky get to stand at the front of the LONG darned line for floggings. I ha

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 7:15pm  •  0 vote

More about Australia. I once read an article that said that back in the 1960s and in earlier decades the Defense Establishment in Australia was dominated by the Army. To me, that was a very curiou

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 6:26pm  •  0 vote

I read an interesting piece of Australian history from the 1930s. A lot of people petitioned the legislature of Western Australia to hold a referendum about leaving the Commonwealth of Australia and t

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 9, 2012, 5:57pm  •  0 vote

Oh, suppose that Parliament passed a law that re-established slavery in the U.K.? So, you are saying that there is no way that the Supreme Court could declare that to be an illegal law? Suppose

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 5:16pm  •  0 vote

As for the metallic chemical elements, watch out for aluminum, molybdenum, lanthanum, tantalum, and platinum, none of which have an "i" in the third-from-the-last position. American metallurgist

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 4:54pm  •  0 vote

Nevertheless, Rickover had a lot of support in Congress, and he eventually got promoted to Vice Admiral, too. He also had a submarine named for him, the USS HYMAN G. RICKOVER, a member of the LOS ANGE

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 9, 2012, 4:38pm  •  0 vote

Oh, nobody ever spells it "labratory" - except perhaps some dolts. The word is "laboratory", Then the typical American pronunciation is more like "LAB-ruh-TOR-ee". We have collapsed just just one sy

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 7, 2012, 3:58pm  •  0 vote

The spell checker for Yahoo also does not know how to spell "gauge". It wants to change this into "gage"??? I have known how to spell "gauge" since about 1965. Back in the '60s, '70s, and '80s, w

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  August 7, 2012, 3:49pm  •  0 vote

Well, Ethan, people are supposed to be using spell checkers, and not robots using spell checkers. People are supposed to use their own brains and get things RIGHT. Today I wrote an e-mail on Yahoo

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 2, 2012, 11:50am  •  1 vote

To me, it is unbelievable that someone does not know that "most" means "more than 50 percent". Where do you get your fantasies? Today, I ate most of my breakfast, I went on a bus ride across most of

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 2, 2012, 11:41am  •  0 vote

Like it or not, statutory law overrides common law in all cases. The Parliament or the Congress can override common law at any point. This is because statuatory law is the supreme law of the lan

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 2, 2012, 11:24am  •  0 vote

The word "most" means "more than 50 percent". So, what are you quibbling about? D.A.W.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 1, 2012, 8:44am  •  0 vote

Where is it that British people live besides in England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland? Note that I mean ones living in the Northern Hemisphere and east of Iceland, too. (No Canadians.) Note a

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 1, 2012, 8:37am  •  0 vote

"The term "the late" meaning "the recently deceased" can't be given the "-est" ending, so "the latest" can't possibly have any connotation of death." 1. How do you know ?? 2. You were missing the

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 29, 2012, 8:24am  •  0 vote

If the Soviets/Russians ever launched a bombing attack that threatened the Bahamas, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Greenland, etc., you can be sure that the Americans and the Canadians would jump to

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 29, 2012, 8:12am  •  0 vote

Jeremy Wheeler is such a moron: "I hope that NORAD would check with the Bahamas' head of state (Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II) before doing any bombing..." NORAD really is an Air Defense Command

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 12:14pm  •  0 vote

Yes, yes, the acts of the the British House of Commons are the Supreme Law of the Land, and all of the local governments of the U.K. are subservient to them. Whatever powers that the regional gove

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 12:05pm  •  0 vote

Wheeler, you don't know the difference between the British People and the United Kingdom. There are also millions of British People (and proud of it) who live in Northern Ireland. So, "British" incude

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 12:01pm  •  0 vote

The acts of the the British House of Commons are the Supreme Law of the Land.

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 28, 2012, 11:56am  •  0 vote

North America = a familiar term for a continent that includes two major countries, the United States of America and Canada, plus several of their neighbors such as Mexico, the Bahamas, Cuba, and Hispa

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 28, 2012, 11:47am  •  0 vote

"Petrol bomb" is slang in that it is not a bomb at all. These do not explode, and they have been used by criminals to set dangerous fires.. On the other hand, it is possible for criminals and te

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 28, 2012, 11:36am  •  0 vote

"Jeremy Wheeler: Tangents? Not at all. I merely quoted your assertion and disproved it with a website link. I notice that you have ignored it." Wheeler, you do not know what a tangent is, a proof i

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 11:22am  •  0 vote

You who say, "that noun is used as an adjective" are wrong. That noun had been converted into an adjective, and hence it can be used ether way, such as in "draft beer". However, this process needs t

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 28, 2012, 10:51am  •  0 vote

AnWulf: I wonder why on Earth you want to argue with me rather than reading the Consitution of the United States and seeing what it really says? A militia is specifically defined there as NOT being

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 12:39pm  •  0 vote

The North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) has exactly the right name because more than one country is a member of it. When we state "North America" we know what we are talking or writing abou

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 12:32pm  •  0 vote

Note, Jeremy, "US troops", "US Navy", "US elections", and "US border", all refer to the Federal Government of the United States, just as I stated before. Likewise, this is true for the US Air Forc

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 25, 2012, 12:22pm  •  0 vote

To: Jeremy Wheeler Once again, you go flying off on tangents. Where is the logic in that? What is the point of it? Now, I have to tell you what the New Zealanders were really writing about. It t

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