Ing

Joined: August 29, 2011  (email not validated)

Number of comments posted: 14

Number of votes received: 11

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Recent Comments

Re: Perpendicular  •  December 2, 2011, 1:08pm  •  0 vote

@Hairy Scot While you are right that outside of mathematics or engineering, "perpendicular" is supposed to mean "vertical", I would say that in everyday speech and print, it more common to see/hear

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 30, 2011, 1:21pm  •  0 vote

@Hairy Scot I actually said in preference to meaning 1a not 1b. I agree meaning 1a is related to pendre - pendulum, pendulous, pending When someone says "I took a chair perpendicular to his" they

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 30, 2011, 11:53am  •  0 vote

Merriam Webster Online gives the following: Definition of PERPENDICULAR 1 a : standing at right angles to the plane of the horizon : exactly upright b : being at right angles to a given line

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  November 30, 2011, 10:51am  •  0 vote

Becky, There is a difference. Consider these sentences (ignore the factuality of these examples!) : 1. Children playing basketball at night is bad. vs 2. Children playing basketball at night

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  November 29, 2011, 7:27am  •  0 vote

In addition to what AnWulf said, I would like to comment that, yes, it is possible to change words/phrases/clauses to make a particular word choice correct, but that is not what the question was about

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  November 28, 2011, 8:06am  •  3 votes

"is" is fine here. "is" goes with "one" - you are referring to one of the things you believed in. You would use "are" if you were to say: There are all sorts of things I believed in then which I d

Re: “8 inches is” or “8 inches are”  •  November 2, 2011, 6:56am  •  1 vote

It is like saying: Seven days is a long time to finish this work. vs There are seven days in a week. AnWulf, in your examples for "is", .... How long is it? It is eight inches long. (It + is) It

Re: always wanted to be  •  November 1, 2011, 11:58am  •  6 votes

Generally, if the context is in the present or recent past then "has" is used and if the context is in the distant past then "had" is used ...... Today Mark got a letter of acceptance from Penn Sta

Re: Just because..., (it) doesn’t mean...  •  September 23, 2011, 10:12am  •  0 vote

I guess some of the questions we have on this forum are examples of spoken language, which are probably alright anyway if that is how people speak in a particular setting or group and everybody gets t

Re: Just because..., (it) doesn’t mean...  •  September 23, 2011, 10:09am  •  0 vote

Yes, Max, I agree your sentence sounds even better.

Re: Just because..., (it) doesn’t mean...  •  September 23, 2011, 5:31am  •  0 vote

How about: "Just because I was mean to you, you should not be mean to me."

Re: Specifying time duration without “for”  •  September 23, 2011, 5:27am  •  0 vote

In spoken English it is fine ... maybe if you are writing it as part of a relatively formal report or something, then would be better to insert "for" .

Re: “This Wednesday” vs. “Next Wednesday”  •  September 9, 2011, 11:46am  •  1 vote

Yes strictly speaking you would say "this coming Wednesday" for future events, and "this past Wednesday" for events in the past - but in most situations "future" and "past" tend to be omitted, as the

Re: “for long”  •  August 29, 2011, 11:00am  •  0 vote

I guess this is comes from usage, not a "rule". It is like asking, if the past tense of "cheat" is "cheated", why isn't the past tense of "eat" "eated". I would say it has to do with the rhythm and