Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

speedwell2

Member Since

February 3, 2004

Total number of comments

477

Total number of votes received

1183

Bio

Latest Comments

Left or right single quote?

  • April 14, 2005, 11:45am

OK, I see that they're inconsistent... and I'm not going to help you decide which mistake to prefer in place of the correct usage. Maybe someone else will help you with that.

Bring Brought

  • April 14, 2005, 11:43am

They're both OK, but the second is less informal and I prefer it.

Left or right single quote?

  • April 14, 2005, 7:55am

Really? When I did desktop publishing, I was supposed to use *appropriate* punctuation. An apostrophe is a different punctuation mark from a single quote.

We, I, or my wife had a baby?

  • April 13, 2005, 1:52pm

Dyske still hasn't mentioned if he really is "...a father of a newborn...." LOL

The Nanny

  • April 13, 2005, 1:49pm

I live in the US, and I've rarely heard people refer to even "glorified" babysitters as nannies. "Nanny" is very close in meaning to "au pair" or "governess," who is the professional caretaker of the kids on a full-time basis, sort of in loco parentis, as Dave says.

On the very few occasions when I've heard "nanny" used for "babysitter," it was for a temporary gal to sit at home with the kids and take care of the house while Mom and Dad were on vacation for a week or two.

Left or right single quote?

  • April 13, 2005, 1:41pm

I was always taught it was an apostrophe, because apostrophes are usually what you use to replace missing letters or numbers in, for example, contractions such as "don't" and "I'm."

Life Savers 5 Flavor

  • April 12, 2005, 2:16pm

Gee, Dan, for someone who uses the internet, you sure are provincial as hell. Loser.

Apostrophe Catastrophe

  • April 12, 2005, 2:15pm

Got one.

http://www.users.bigpond.com/J_fersOffice/sample.htm

"When you have 'double possession' - when two or more people (or subjects) own one item and both (or all) of their names are mentioned, the apostrophe is applied only to the second (or last) name.

'We had coffee at Ermintrude and Marmaduke's mansion.'"

Think of your statement as "The advisor of Bob and Tina Rusk [not Rusks] suggests...".

Apostrophe Catastrophe

  • April 12, 2005, 2:11pm

First, absolutely, as Nicholas says. Will find cite.

Slemmet's solution is the proper and elegant one. It's not clear to me whether you should use "Officials of..." or "The officials of...," but that's a quibble you can quickly resolve.

Questions

Taking the Name, in vain or in earnest September 23, 2004