Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

speedwell2

Member Since

February 3, 2004

Total number of comments

477

Total number of votes received

1013

Bio

Latest Comments

This construction is puzzling me...

  • April 21, 2005, 2:02pm

(cries) I didn't actually miss that but I didn't want to post four times in a row.

Dyske, I wish we had a preview....

This construction is puzzling me...

  • April 21, 2005, 9:40am

Anonymous was me, sorry....

This construction is puzzling me...

  • April 21, 2005, 9:36am

Persephone and I are on the same page, but I'd make a slight additional change and say, "How about a return to the days when women were in such vulnerable and inferior positions, that it was easier for powerful men, who knew they could get away with it, to take advantage of them?"

Past or Past Perfect

  • April 20, 2005, 5:18pm

Wouldn't you like it better if the sentence read, "He had spoken to his teacher before the examination had begun?" I think there's nothing wrong with "He spoke to his teacher before the examination began."

But "He had spoken to his teacher before the examination began" seems like an awkward mixture to me. Anyone else think so?

Upon/on

  • April 20, 2005, 5:16pm

Persephone... subtle, subtle. LOL

Upon/on

  • April 20, 2005, 8:44am

Pet, the use of "differentiated" is correct in this sentence. The word can be used, and often is used, outside of a mathematical context--for instance in biology, to refer to 'cell differentiation."

But technical meanings aside, both the transitive and intransitive meanings of the word are well attested and correct, even in situations in which you may personally prefer a synonym such as "discriminate" or "distinguish."

Bloody Mary

  • April 19, 2005, 8:15am

I have a recurring problem with Scotch and soda, but... uh, never mind. :)

American versus British question

  • April 18, 2005, 8:48am

Both ways work for me also, and, like CQ, I had to read twice to catch the "on." I agree, use the "on" if you think it sounds better.

Apostrophe Catastrophe

  • April 15, 2005, 2:40pm

Marriage has nothing to do with it. Ownership in common is what counts here. One may correctly say, for example, "John Doe and Mary Roe's lawsuit against their employer."

We, I, or my wife had a baby?

  • April 14, 2005, 11:46am

Excellent. Hooray :) Best wishes to all of you.

Questions

Taking the Name, in vain or in earnest September 23, 2004