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Login into or log in to

I’m damn confused about this... Can anybody tell me which is the right way to say?

“I am sorry to hear that you have trouble with login into our website.”

or

” I am sorry that you have trouble with log in to our website.”

I feel both are wrong. If so, what is the right way to say this?

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Yeah, both sound clumsy.

A better rendering would be, "I am sorry to hear that you have trouble logging in to our website."

If "login" (n) must be used, "I am sorry to hear that you have trouble with the login to our website" seems better.

It's the ambiguous nature of that word "login" that makes it awkward -- it's a noun made up of a verb, and since its a new word, that kinda confused people when they hear it, I think.

dave March 10, 2005 @ 2:14AM

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I think "I'm sorry to hear that you have trouble logging into our website" sounds ok...

sfgiantsrock4 March 11, 2005 @ 9:04PM

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Am I just old, or didn't we used to say "log on" to a network rather than "log in?"

speedwell2 March 14, 2005 @ 8:18AM

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I still hear people use "sign on" and "log on" very often, usually interchangeably with "log in," "login," and "sign in."

lamont2718 March 14, 2005 @ 5:58PM

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Thank you guys! It was very helpful. :)

jennifer March 15, 2005 @ 12:40AM

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I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble logging in to our website."

What is the problem with this statement??????????

I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble logging in to our website."

clickmaadi March 22, 2005 @ 8:12AM

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I log on.

You login.

He/She/It logs in or into or on, as the case may be

degustibus June 15, 2005 @ 12:50AM

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RE: log on vs. log in,
I couldn't begin to say why, but I tend to think of logging on as establishing an actual network or internet connection, e.g. dialup, or, as was mentioned in the old days, connecting to a time-shared mainframe with dumb terminals. If your not logged on, your terminal is a paperweight. You're not ON the network or ON the system at all. I think of logging IN as providing a username and password to get access to a particular area; a website, a shopping cart, some secure locality, etc. You can be ON, but not IN.
I won't swear to it, but I think you'll find this to be often true in common usage.

porsche November 24, 2005 @ 3:58PM

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When you log on you are on the system. When you log in you are in; inside a particular area.

porsche November 24, 2005 @ 4:00PM

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