Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

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Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

you ‘had better not’ read it...

Why does ‘not’ in ‘you’d better not go there’ stands separately after ‘had better’ phrase but forms ‘hadn’t’ in the question:’Hadn’t you better go now?’ I see no logic here...

  • August 31, 2004
  • Posted by marta
  • Filed in Grammar
  • 6 comments

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Comments

Perhaps there is some logic to it, but I'd have to sit down and think about it some more. Language isn't always logical, in any case; nor should it be.

Dave3 Aug-31-2004

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Maybe this lack of logic results from sb's mistake or not knowing proper grammar...

marta1 Sep-03-2004

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Ummm...maybe because one means "Don't go" and the other means "Go." Meaning - the two uses have nothing to do with each other.

Jessie1 Sep-16-2004

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Are you serious?
the reason the had and not are seperate is because they are meant to be.
Had better not - a threat saying that one should not do something if he does not want something to happen to him
Hadn't you - improper grammar "had not you" ????
I suppose it means you should

you should vs. you should not

two different meanings.
you tell me why the not is not next to the had.
:)

Ben2 Sep-18-2004

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Ben, if your best answer to a grammar question is essentially, "because that's the way it IS, dammit, and if you disagree, then up yours," then maybe you should reconsider posting.

speedwell2 Sep-19-2004

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Well in the first 'not' negates the action as in 'not going' 'not walking' while in the second is the negative form of a past tense event. 'To have had' or 'To not have'

I think 'shouldn't you go now?' would be more logical.

Bryan1 Sep-23-2004

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