Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Damien K

Member Since

April 13, 2015

Total number of comments

3

Total number of votes received

5

Bio

Latest Comments

What’s happening to the Passive?

  • April 13, 2015, 2:16pm

On a different thread - my daughter who studied ancient Greek tells me that the literal translation of the Homer is something like

"beware Greeks - and (as for) Greeks bearing gifts!"

Lots of good answers here.

Another way of looking at this is to ask who has the authority to decide the "right" way to spell any of these words using the Roman alphabet - and the obvious answer is no-one. Hence lots of spellings.

Is “leverage” a verb?

  • April 13, 2015, 2:03pm

Impressive responses here.

Incidentally, George Orwell, who is generally viewed as an excellent exponent of English written style, said the same as Jayles the Unwoven. Grammatically you can use a noun as a verb - he quoted "tabling a motion".

Leveraging is a useful verb as it does not mean the same as levering. To lever something (a manhole lid perhaps) you apply a lever to it. To leverage something you apply it to the other end of a lever in order to multiply its effect. So when I used a pick axe at the weekend to lift a manhole lid, I was levering the lid but leveraging my strength. In corporate finance, leveraging is not just borrowing, but using credit to increase the effect of some existing assets. Certainly (like a lot of Americanisms) really useful when used well.