Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

bubbha

Member Since

December 24, 2011

Total number of comments

110

Total number of votes received

378

Bio

Latest Comments

Rules for -ise and -ize

  • March 30, 2011, 9:55am

Generally, "-ise" is British (though I heard even in the UK, "realize" is correct), while "-ize" is American (except for "advertise", which is proper spelling in the US).

It’s Official: email not e-mail

  • March 30, 2011, 9:52am

In formal writing, and especially resumes, I always hyphenate e-mail. It looks better to me.

“I’ve got” vs. “I have”

  • March 30, 2011, 9:49am

The English language (as with pretty much any language) is filled with examples of multiple ways of expressing the same idea. I don't consider that redundancy.

The "have" and "got" in "have got" are also not redundant, because the "have" is an auxiliary verb, while the "got" is a participle.

"Er, of course the L in “walk” and “talk” is silent. Who pronounces these words with the sound /l/? No one."

My grad-school housemate pronounced the L in both "walk" and "talk". He grew up in Iowa, but he remains the only person I've ever met who talked like this, and I lived in Iowa for 5 years.

cannot vs. can not

  • February 13, 2011, 2:23am

"cannot" is preferred; using "can not" runs you the risk of looking uneducated (despite being technically OK). Obvious exceptions are sentences like "This device can not only slice; it can also dice!"

gifting vs. giving a gift

  • February 13, 2011, 2:18am

"Gifting" reminds me of "conversating". A totally unnecessary coinage.

Resume, resumé, or résumé?

  • January 27, 2011, 6:27pm

Accent marks in English are like rock dots; they look pretty, they might let you know how a word originally sounded in it's native language, but they are strictly speaking like tits on a boar they don't really look right there because they don't belong, but it'd probably look weird without them too either way they don't do anything worthwhile either so take 'em or leave 'em. At least in resumé it helps to discern it from resume in printed references but we survived through other heteronyms just fine. As for keeping things the same as the language we borrowed them from BULLSHIT! We don't preserve the pronunciation or spell of the overwhelmingly vast majority of loan words nor do other languages, the only thing we typically do observe with regularity is ñ and that's only because it uses common English phonemes.

Lying is knowingly telling something that's not true with the intent to deceive. Thus, being mistaken or telling fictional stories for entertainment are not forms of lying.

obliged or obligated?

  • December 31, 2010, 4:18pm

To Obligate is a backformation or re-verbing of the original verb "to Oblige".
There are other examples like "To Orientate/To Orient".

Due to common usage the backformed verbs are considered acceptable.

In a nutshell, they took a bunch of words that ended in "tion" and made a verb out of them, usually by adding "tate" to the end. In some cases a shorter form of the verb already existed, so they formed an unnecessary verb that was longer than the original.

Orient - Orientat ion - Orient ate
Oblige - Obligat ion - Oblig ate

obliged or obligated?

  • December 31, 2010, 4:13pm

The 'ated' words are a back formation or re-verbing of words that ended in tion. Some examples include orientate and obligate.

Despite the fact that verbs such as 'to orient" and "to oblige" already existed, there are many examples of words that end in 'tion' that have been backformed into verbs by removing tion and adding tate.

This resulted in 'orientate' when the original and more correct verb is "to orient". To orient was to turn a map so that the map pointed towards the Orient. Orientate is a re-verb that people assume is correct due to common usage.

Obligation thus became 'to obligate' despite the fact that the original verb was 'to oblige'. Obligate has fallen into common use, especially in the US, and a distinction between the two has grown out of either a need for distinction, or the seperation of regions where one or the other is used exclusively.

Cheers,