Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Astartes

Member Since

October 7, 2011

Total number of comments

23

Total number of votes received

87

Bio

Latest Comments

Prepositions at the end of a clause

  • November 2, 2011, 8:08pm

Genius!

Prepositions at the end of a clause

  • October 28, 2011, 7:18am

Alright!! I get it.

Seriously, though, thank you all for enlightening me. I was obviously misinformed. This really needs to be emphasized in schools. Some teachers say one thing, while other teachers say another. The teachers need to make it clear what the rules are.

What happened to who, whom and whose?

  • September 19, 2011, 12:52pm

I don't know if this is a cultural thing. One's speech is a reflection of his or her education and level of apathy. Most people are educated in the matter, but don't care enough to remember or put it into practice. I agree with Kyle about languages evolving, but they should only evolve for improvement, not reduced complexity. "That" and "who/whom" can sometimes be used interchangeably, and I feel this is something that has come to being due to the lack of education about the topic. The use of "who" in all cases including those which require "whom" is simply unacceptable. The difference between the usage of "who" and "whom" is no gray area in the language. The rules on the matter are clearly defined. It seems that this error arises from the constant placement of prepositions at the end of sentences. If people would just use prepositions correctly in a sentence, the proper usage of "who" and "whom" would become plain to the human ear.

On Tomorrow

  • May 6, 2010, 1:08pm

Douglas, calm down.

As you aptly pointed out, we had a white President who was infamous for mispronouncing nuclear, and I, a white man, have probably mispronounced asterisk myself. Just because someone else has made the same error, doesn’t mean it is proper or standard English. It’s great to celebrate the diversity in non-standard English or different dialects, but a professional setting among professional educators calls for standard English.

If you celebrate diversity among non-standard English, you shouldn’t be so offended at the observation that cultural backgrounds affect the way we all speak. I’m sure if we went deep enough into Appalachia or watched enough of The Beverly Hillbillies we would find plenty of uniquely white non-standard variations.

On Tomorrow

  • April 21, 2010, 10:39am

Sharon, I'm not trying to be mean, but while we're on the topic of correcting people's grammar, don't you mean "too bad"?

On Tomorrow

  • April 21, 2010, 10:33am

In my observation, I have never heard a white redneck in the South say, “on tomorrow.”

It is a southern black thing. As previously mentioned, it's usually used by public school teachers or administrators. In their efforts to overcome negative stereotypes about their intelligence and speech patterns they over enunciate and add extra words. It's tragic that they're trying so hard not to use Ebonics but just end up sounding ignorant anyway. And what teacher is going to have the courage to go up and correct their principal?

First annual vs. second annual

  • June 17, 2009, 1:12pm

Inaugural is how you describe the first event, then the next year is the First Annual event because it's the first anniversary of doing whatever you're doing. It is confusing, though. Consider dropping "annual" or just use the year.

Gerontophile?

  • November 28, 2007, 6:51am

i don't think it necessarily implies an unnatural or unhealthy attraction, simply an attraction.

The Toronto Maple Leafs

  • May 7, 2006, 7:14pm

Nobody wants to be a Canadian....
That is laughable.

USA

Questions

Prepositions at the end of a clause October 7, 2011