Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

scyllacat

Member Since

December 16, 2008

Total number of comments

38

Total number of votes received

184

Bio

Latest Comments

Whom are you?

  • October 14, 2010, 12:39pm

The answer to your question is "not a chance." The verb "to be" indicates identity and the nominative case "Who" is the right one to use.

Interrogative use of perhaps/maybe

  • August 12, 2010, 11:02am

Yes. It's not ever going to work for formal English. If you were writing it, and you meant it interrogatively, it would have a question mark, but you would not ever use it formally.

I don't know if there's a description that explains that. At first I thought it would be a sentence fragment. A question like the example you used would be written as "Do we need to add some more salt, perhaps?" The "perhaps" or "maybe" is a modifier, and it's just got nothing to do with the sentence structure as a question.

Plural of Yes

  • July 21, 2010, 11:48am

I believe "Yesses" is correct. It looks really funny, I know.

“she” vs “her”

  • June 20, 2010, 11:40am

No, you could NOT both be correct. The pronouns have to match in declension, so "She" goes with "I" and "her " goes with "me." When the pronouns are the Subject of the clause, then "She," "He," "We," and/or "I traveled..." But when the pronouns are the Object of action, then "The bus ran over her/him/me/us."

I disagree. This is one of those cases where sound matters. There IS a pencil and three pens. There ARE three pens and a pencil.

A piece of irony

  • May 20, 2010, 3:17am

Joke's on you. "Ignert" is a colloquial form, frequently pronounced that way to invoke the dialect, as goofy pointed out.

i.e. In an "ironic" twist, if you point out someone using/pronouncing "ignorant" wrong, you'll end up looking "ignert."

Space After Period

  • December 15, 2009, 11:53pm

It's a style issue, not a rule. There's nothing to argue ABOUT. In my job, the style book says "two spaces," but my style book is specific to my industry, so there's no erason for me to argue with anyone else's one space.

And I did use two spaces between my sentences.

Fetch Referring to People?

  • September 21, 2009, 12:34pm

Possibly regional, given the division, but yes, in the South where I am, we "fetch" people all the time and think nothing of it. There may be areas where it's seen as, or used in, a belittling way, but it's not inherent in the definition.

Apparently, a lot of people, including myself, forget that their individual experiences may not reflect the entire truth of the matter.

Agreed. This is not a grammar issue. Grammatically, "waive" works fine. In fact, I prefer it to "release." I'm sorry to have published this comment without adding content. :)

Capitalization of dog breeds

  • August 24, 2009, 3:56pm

#1 is right--except I'm not sure if I should capitalize ""French fries" now. Great.

Only capitalize the proper name words: "German," "Labrador," "English," "Newfoundland," and "Dalmatian." Dog breed ITSELF is not a proper name, so "bulldog" and "English bulldog," "poodle" and "French poodle." Okay?