Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

erle

Member Since

April 10, 2003

Total number of comments

13

Total number of votes received

16

Bio

Latest Comments

Taking sides

  • April 10, 2003, 8:22pm

Sorry, kortazone, "I'm taking sides with Kelly" is what most Americans would say--it's OK. However, "I'm siding with Kelly" eliminates the problem.

"I'm not ready to take sides on this." Also common, also correct.

The wages of sin is death.

Matching the tense

  • April 10, 2003, 8:09pm

Much of what's posted here has to do with idiom, not necessarily with what is colloquial as opposed to formal.

American idiom, New Zealand idiom, Australian idiom, Canadian idiom.... All are different and make learning English especially difficult for those for whom English is not their native tonge. (Not to mention regional idiom within a country or that English usage may change faster than we can keep up with.)

Consider, too, that English is no respecter of logic. Listen to a child learning the language. A child will learn the "rules" for regular verbs long before she learns how to use even a few of the irregular verbs. My grandson Alec is five years old and consistently uses constructions such as "I hitted the ball" rather than "I hit the ball." He'll eventually learn what's "right" but it will take quite a while.

Nima Arian is not exactly wrong, but is a bit inflexible. Teresa Nielsen Hayde is right. killy is partially right, and posts instructively; however, killy slips up and misuses "it's" for "its." That may well be the most common mistake made in English. Another poster joins me in nitpicking by pointing out killy's mistaking a clause for a phrase.

"It's" is a contraction for "It is." "Its" is the possessive of "it." There's no such construction as "its,'" but I've seen it in print more than once. (Note that I use the American typographers' convention of putting quotes after periods and commas. Not because it makes sense or is logical, but because typographers think their convention looks "prettier." Beauty must be more important to American typographers than making sense.)

To be a real nitpicker, even the estimable TNH is not exactly right. "Continual" would probably be a better word to use than "continuous." Best of all might be to say "a continuing state." No doubt what I've written could be nitpicked, too. Please don't bother.

Value

  • April 10, 2003, 7:18pm

Context is absent, but I'd say, "It has value" means "It is valuable." Meaning: substantial value.

"It has a value" means "It is not worthless." Meaning: minimal value.