Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

purpledragon_13

Member Since

November 23, 2002

Total number of comments

17

Total number of votes received

72

Bio

Latest Comments

What Rhymes?

  • November 23, 2002, 8:30am

Rhyming is mostly concerned with the last part of the word, sometimes the last syllable or the last few syllables. In the above example, "people" rhymes with "steeple" because the last parts of the words both sound like "-eeple". Whereas not many words rhyme with purple, because they would have to end in "-erple" sound.

a shit

  • November 23, 2002, 2:59am

Merge is correct. It's shortened to be coloquial. Just like when people say "Don't give me attitude" instead of "He has a bad attitude." But the reason why there is no article is because in the first two cases "shit" is used to sort of describe the situation or how bad something is. Whereas in the third example, "shit" is used as a noun, as in a physical thing, just like you could use "I don't give a rat's ass". In the first two, bull-shit and shit are used to illustrate the degree of negativity.

A Few Too Few

  • November 23, 2002, 2:48am

I agree with the above. "few" is used to describe how many people are there. "A few" is used as sort of a noun. But they basically mean the same thing. Many times in English, phrases are shortened. So "a few" probably was originally said as "a very few".

A Part of ...

  • November 23, 2002, 2:41am

I could not describe this reasoning more beautifully than the post above. But, take into consideration that many times in English, sentences are shortened to save time and space. Therefore sometimes small articles like "a" and "the" can be deleted with the same meaning being implied. I know, it's so confusing. But usually when kids learn English in schools, the teachers usually tell them to listen to other people having conversations, or when you read, read outloud. Soon you will have an "ear" for the English language. In a way, you will be able to tell what things "sound right" and what things "sound wrong."

Emotionality

  • November 23, 2002, 2:30am

Both emotionality and emotion are nouns. But emotionality is concerns with representing the nature of someone or something's "emotion". For example, if I were to say "Dyske is a very sensitive person. Sometimes he can't control his emotions." You could respond by saying, "I can't explain why I am like that, it is just my emotionality." I soppose both words could be used interchangeably, but most people use emotion because the latter is rather redundant.

Letter A

  • November 23, 2002, 2:24am

Well, in this case, "A" is the item's name. So rather than calling it a knife or a gun, we call it "exhibit A". Sort of a pseudonym. So since A is its name, you call it A instead of "an A". Just like you would say "Look, there is Dyske over there" instead of saying "Look, there is a Dyske over there."

Multi-disciplinary

  • November 23, 2002, 2:21am

In this case, "discipline" refers to feilds of study. Just like "disciple" means "follower or pupil." This would be a noun or thing, whereas disciplined would be a verb. I know, it's confusing. English doesn't really makes sense all the time. :)