Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

yoinkmydanish

Member Since

November 11, 2002

Total number of comments

22

Total number of votes received

62

Bio

Latest Comments

Fried Chicken

  • December 30, 2002, 12:56am

As if counting in Japanese is any easier, ha!

Neither is or neither are

  • December 20, 2002, 5:01pm

It's the 'and' vs. 'or' implication.

Neither is saying that "not vodka" or "not rum" in the singular, so neither, by itself, is correct.

Also, were you to use the combination of the two in your discussion of ideal, the combination would be a singular in the context, so 'neither is' would still apply.

Five of Ten

  • December 10, 2002, 1:28pm

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=of

17. Before; until: five minutes of two.

Gone to Seed

  • December 2, 2002, 11:15am

A humourous side note.

I just searched for "hit a snag" "off his rocker" "gone to seed" in google, and got the Bobby Fischer article from URLdj. Wonder what Dyske's been reading...

hit a snag

  • December 2, 2002, 11:12am

Literally, a snag is something that gets in the way, specifically the jagged edge of a rock or a tree or something. So if you were pulling something by a rope, and it got caught on a tree, you would literally 'hit a snag' which would delay progress.

Hence the reason it's used to indicate running into an unforeseen problem or delay.

Control

  • November 13, 2002, 9:40pm

"I have full control" is correct.

'Controls' in the plural of the noun form of 'control'. 'Controls' are objects that allow you to control something.

When you say you have control, you have control OF something... Even if the 'of' is not said, it is implied. While it is also the noun form of control, it is an entirely separate meaning as it is used to describe your relation to something, rather than the thing itself.

I really wish I knew the terms in English grammar as well as I do Spanish Grammar. Le sigh.

Where are the commas?

  • November 13, 2002, 4:30pm

Fancy that. I swear to all that is holy that English sucks donkey testicles.

Matching Numbers

  • November 13, 2002, 4:27pm

Nope Dyske.

"These computers each come with a 40GB drive" is correct, since the subject is 'these computers' is the subject, and it's plural.

"Each of these computers comes with a 40GB drive" is correct as well. The subject is "each of..." which is singular, and therefore you'd use comes.

This site would be great in studying for the SAT II writing test.

Matching Numbers

  • November 12, 2002, 9:55am

"These computers EACH come with a 40GB drive"

-or-

"These computers come with 40GB drives."

The first is preferable, the second is ambiguous.

What is / What are

  • November 11, 2002, 5:03pm

"These will not bring us happiness" or "these are not what will bring us happiness" would be my recommendations, since repeating 'are' when it can be avoided is rather clumsy sounding.

"Are going" is just a present-tense way of suggesting the future-tense, so 'are going' can generally be replaced with 'will.'