Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files within 24 hours. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

 

jayles

Joined: August 12, 2010
Comments posted: 753
Votes received: 109

No user description provided.

Questions Submitted

Five eggs is too many

June 30, 2013

Recent Comments

See:
https://data.grammarbook.com/blog/quotation-mar...

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/921...

The trick at the end is to leave a space after the single quotation mark, separating it from the double.

jayles March 26, 2018, 8:20pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

Four and seventy-three thousandths per cent ??? (4.073%)

jayles March 4, 2018, 12:08am

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

On google books "neither are to blame" shows up just nineteen times, whereas "neither is to blame" has over five thousand results.

https://www.google.com/search?biw=1432&bih=...

jayles February 20, 2018, 10:18pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

" neither were significant predictors of the outcome measures"
"they were not working mischief, neither were they doing any great good; "
"neither were most of their members prepared to take part as citizens."
"Things are either what they appear to be: or they neither are, nor appear to be"
"And if the fountains are not gods, neither are the rivers,"
"Neither are we truly portraying what Christ's disciple means. "

Both are possible, depending on the context:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=n...

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22neither%20we...

jayles February 19, 2018, 4:54am

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

KING HENRY
We are in God’s hand, brother, not in theirs.
March to the bridge. It now draws toward night.
Beyond the river we’ll encamp ourselves,
And on tomorrow bid them march away.
Henry V Act 3, Scene 6, Page 7

So Shakespeare used "poor grammar and .... stupid."

http://nfs.sparknotes.com/henryv/page_132.html

http://random-idea-english.blogspot.co.nz/2014/...

It is perfectly normal to say "until tomorrow", "for tomorrow", "by tomorrow", "after tomorrow", so "on tomorrow" is not that much of a stretch.

https://goo.gl/FBSZMx

jayles January 18, 2018, 4:10am

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=e...

E.g. or e.g. is at least twelve times more common in the book corpus used by Google.
"Eg" or "EG" is sometimes an abbreviation for "electrogram", or "elliptical galaxy". For some reason, a few German texts are included in the Google books results, and these use "EG" to mean "Eingriff" and so forth. I have only sighted one valid example of "eg" being used to mean "for example" in this corpus.
From all this I would conclude that "e.g." is the norm.

jayles January 13, 2018, 12:48pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

@Matthe Ware
It sounds like a school test! To me either would be "correct"; in fact 'extensive assortment of diamonds' comes up about a dozen times as a phrase on google, but 'expensive...' does not, if that is a good criterion.

jayles December 19, 2017, 12:12pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

jayles December 14, 2017, 6:04pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

More examples, some using "gifted" as an adjective, but some using "gifted" as part of a passive verb.

jayles December 14, 2017, 6:03pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

Some examples of "gift" being used as a verb, or as a verbal participle can be found here:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=g...*%2Cwas+gifted+by&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cgifting%20program%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20assets%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20process%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20money%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20plan%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20land%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20stock%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifting%20property%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifted%20assets%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cgifted%20money%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Cgifted%20with%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20a%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20an%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20great%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20such%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20that%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20imagination%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20second%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20all%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgifted%20with%20more%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cwas%20gifted%20by%3B%2Cc0

It seems that these usages are perfectly normal in the right context.

jayles December 14, 2017, 5:57pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

@riley
"requires" and "is" are more common than "require" and "are" in published books.

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=GA...

jayles December 4, 2017, 12:52am

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

@ Chrissy

Since you are college educated at least get the facts straight:

http://random-idea-english.blogspot.co.nz/2014/...

jayles November 9, 2017, 2:25pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=ad...*_NOUN%2Cadvocate+for+the+*&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20%2A_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20violence_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20policies_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20role_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20change_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20groups_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20general_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20Ralph_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20changes_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20peace_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20use_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20for%20the%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20child%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20rights%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20client%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20patient%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20poor%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20defence%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20needs%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20use%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20interests%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20elderly%3B%2Cc0

jayles November 7, 2017, 2:44pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=a...*_NOUN%2Cadvocate+for+the+*&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20%2A_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20violence_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20policies_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20role_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20change_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20groups_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20general_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20Ralph_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20changes_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20peace_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20use_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20for%20the%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20child%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20rights%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20client%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20patient%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20poor%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20defence%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20needs%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20use%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20interests%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20elderly%3B%2Cc0

jayles November 7, 2017, 2:43pm

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

However "impacted" as an adjective seems to retain its original physical meaning:

http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=%22impacted%22...

jayles October 1, 2017, 5:04am

0 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=eq...

Even in American books, equivalence is far more common.

jayles July 21, 2017, 1:27pm

3 votes    Permalink    Report Abuse

@HS There is a long article on "wh" here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pronunciation_of_E...

I do remember being taught to pronounce "whether" as "hwether" at primary school in the 1950's ( SE England) ; but when I started work, I dropped it as being too affected and snobby. Technically though, "wh" is a digraph like "th" and "ch" and "ph".

jayles July 6, 2017, 3:24am

1 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

@AC That seems about right; but perhaps someone will come up with an exception. Maybe I am wrong here, but are there not dialects (perhaps Somerset?) where there is some kind of an "r" sound (non-trilled) at the end of a word?

jayles June 29, 2017, 8:15pm

2 votes    Permalink    Report Abuse

@AC In "care", "bare", "here", "hare", the final "e" seems to be a spelling hangover rather than a real vowel, and today just affects the pronunciation of the vowel in the previous syllable. Compare cut/cute, car/care, bar/bare/bear, her/here and so on.
Also in the phrase "after all", the "r" sound reappears to link the two words.
Above are just special cases for non-rhotic dialects.

jayles June 29, 2017, 4:55pm

1 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse