Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

dave

Member Since

December 27, 2004

Total number of comments

14

Total number of votes received

29

Bio

Latest Comments

eg, e.g., or eg.

  • November 11, 2011, 12:27pm

Either is fine: "eg" or "e.g." Periods in abbreviations that are so readily understood are becoming obsolete, or at least optional.

I don't see "eg." much, with just one period, and if I did, I'd probably assume it was a typo or error.

“for long”

  • August 29, 2011, 8:11am

Very curious. I see what you mean. I was about to say it's not *strictly* true; for example, you can ask "Will you be long?" or "Will you be there for long?" But on reflection, "long" is still a negative in both questions, almost as if "long" really means "too long."

So yeah, interesting observation. But I have no clue as to the answer. :p

Yeah, you're spot on about the ambiguity of my rendering. "Officials of Bobby Thompson (Rutter)" it is.

you all

  • April 5, 2005, 10:55am

"Hey, everyone," would be common. Whether the singular-plural distinction always requires separate grammatical forms in this context is debatable. There are all kinds of ways we communicate these distinctions, e.g. body language, eye contact etc.

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