Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

dave

Member Since

December 27, 2004

Total number of comments

14

Total number of votes received

25

Bio

Latest Comments

Anyways

  • April 2, 2013, 3:08am

What Warsaw Will said. It's only used in North American English, to my knowledge, or at least it's never used in British English. When I moved from Canada to England as a kid, my classmates teased me mercilessly about saying "anyways." They'd repeat, "British Anyways," a pun on "British Airways." :D

Titled vs. Entitled

  • August 8, 2012, 2:01am

Both meanings of "entitled" are established. In my experience, "entitled" in the sense of "named" is mostly British usage. In North American English, "titled" seems to be preferred.

Referent of “one”

  • July 3, 2012, 1:09am

That's generally true, but a noun isn't always just one word. "Melody" is a noun, and so is "form," but "form of melody" is also a noun. In this case, it's the referent of the pronoun "one."

There's also the musical context; a melody only ever appearing in one composer's work would be unremarkable.

Maybe this is why the Germans like to bunch up all their nounphrases into newwords.

I’ve no idea

  • April 14, 2012, 4:33am

None of the examples you've given is wrong. You're probably just not used to hearing them. "I've an idea" is very common in my experience. "I've to go" is much less common (again, in my experience, although it's not totally unfamiliar to me), but "I've" is, after all, just an abbreviation of "I have."

Give those poor friends a break.

Nother

  • March 12, 2012, 5:15pm

Hairy Scot, can you provide some objective reason why "nother" should be seen as "dumbing down"?

I remember that show. The host was Paul something.

You did fine just now.

Nother

  • March 5, 2012, 2:07am

Hear, hear, Sandy.

Nother

  • February 28, 2012, 12:13am

Language is changing, not "devolving," just as it always has.

Negative connotation of “notoriety”

  • January 25, 2012, 2:23am

I'm not aware of a shift in meaning. I think those instances you cited are just cases of the writer or editor not understanding the meaning.

Questions

Film titles November 20, 2004
American versus British question April 17, 2005
This construction is puzzling me... April 21, 2005
S.P.E.C.S. May 4, 2005