Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

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Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

in to or into?

When do you use “in to” versus “into”?

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Comments

in to is used when the following word is an infinitive.

i.e. come in to warm up, it's cold outside.

while into is a preposition refering to a direction of movement or action.

i.e. Please put the oranges into the box.

There is more, but this is a simple explanation. I hope it helps.

EFL_Geek Jun-04-2005

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How about "on" Vs. "onto" EFL_Geek?
Please explain.

Unggit_Tjitradjaja Jun-06-2005

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Same rules apply. "Onto" is a preposition, you only use "on to" if one of the words is not a preposition i.e. part of a predicate/infinitive.

IngisKahn1 Jun-06-2005

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I speak perfect English and that is one of those things that native speakers just know. EFL Geek is correct but I couldn't think of that myself.

Steve1 Jun-17-2005

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> "Onto" is a preposition, you only use "on to"
> if one of the words is not a preposition i.e.
> part of a predicate/infinitive.

What about "I plan to continue on to graduate school"?

bubbha Feb-18-2006

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