Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

John Thiesmeyer

Member Since

June 23, 2015

Total number of comments

5

Total number of votes received

0

Bio

Latest Comments

“hand”

  • July 2, 2015, 5:18pm

I can't imagine why johnrodrigez72 is recommending a plagiarism factory to anyone! Plagiarism, including essays written by someone that another receives credit for, is dishonest and likely to fail in whatever its ambition is.

“Rack” or “Wrack”?

  • June 23, 2015, 8:45pm

It may be that people spell it both ways, but that doesn't change the fact that "wrack" is a mistake for the original "rack," i.e. "torture." Racking your brain doesn't mean messing it up or wrecking it.

I don't think "nervous of" can ever substitute for "nervous about" in good English. "She was the most nervous of the three performers" is OK.

Opposition to “pretty”

  • June 23, 2015, 6:49pm

The only problem with "pretty" in this usage is that it is vague, like "kind of" or "sort of" (kinda, sorta). It's an empty intensifier, and appropriate only in informal speech. "Pretty much" isn't any better. "Somewhat" and "fairly" fall into this category, as well/

“In the long term”

  • June 23, 2015, 6:43pm

The idiomatic phrases are "in the long run" and "over the long term." "In the long term" isn't wrong, it just sounds odd to the experienced reader. If you care, go with the standard idiom.