Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Hacovo

Member Since

November 30, 2011

Total number of comments

28

Total number of votes received

48

Bio

Latest Comments

watch much stuff?

  • May 10, 2012, 8:17am

See, that sounds weird also. 'Much sugar'; 'much water'... It sounds odd to hear 'much' by itself I suppose. If it were 'very much' or 'that much'. My default would be to say 'I have a lot of sugar' instead of 'I have much sugar'. Heck, I could even tolerate 'I don't have much sugar'. So once again, it boils down to '[verb] + much', and it must just be the lack of euphony for my auditory palate.

watch much stuff?

  • April 26, 2012, 12:32pm

I think my problem may be 'much' being coupled with a plural noun (stuff in this case referring to 'tv shows'), in which case my brain is expecting 'many'. Obviously you wouldn't say 'many stuff', but I think that I'm still thinking of 'stuff' as 'shows' in my mind. Does that make sense?

watch much stuff?

  • April 18, 2012, 11:01pm

Yes, directly replacing programs on television (sorry for leaving that out).
I suppose it probably is the complete lack of euphony that is bugging me.

A Somewhat Intricate Sentence

  • April 18, 2012, 10:53pm

I started on the comments, but tl;dnr...
Going to add my two cents anyways (and chalk it up to adding more weight to this side of the debate... yeah, that). ;)
Length aside, I would remove 'up' entirely since you have upstairs, and also delete the second 'back' since it, too, sounds redundant...
"And back to his room upstairs would go little bastard, to his beloved stories..."
(also, aren't you supposed to not start a sentence with 'and'?)

Prepositions at the end of a clause

  • December 6, 2011, 10:27am

Or, 'we might could do that'.

"People take grammar too seriously." um, isn't that kind of the point here? ;)

WW: I stand corrected. Both of your examples make sense (and I would read them that way. Thanks for the semicolons; they help readability). Your last sentence is something I don't think many have learned. I was always taught to read something out loud (or at least 'aloud in my head') to determine it's syntactical integrity. However, I believe one must first know the rules and how to apply them in order for this strategy to work. Plenty of people write things how they think it should sound, but lack the foundation of any sense of proper English or any sort of rules. Thus we get offenses such as are apparent all over the internet as well as the many infiltrating public and business publications (at least in America).

Had he breakfast this morning?

  • December 6, 2011, 9:41am

True, I'm American (guilty, sadly).
What you say makes perfect sense. In my head I think 'starved - to starve due to an imposed restriction of food; starving - beyond hungry'. The second being something that could be self-imposed, or simply due to busy-ness or the like.
Thanks for the culture lesson :)

...ward/s and un...worthy

  • December 6, 2011, 9:35am

WW, I'm confused by your post (not the last one you made, but the one before that).
You say that -worthy words are mostly based on nouns, and yet two of your examples are verbs. I could see praise as a noun, however praiseworthy suggests worthy of praise (the action of praising) and I can hardly think of cringe as a noun.
As an aside, I've never heard anyone use airworthy (though it's meaning is clear to me) but seaworthy is much more common to my ear. Of course, I also live in a coastal area ;)

sigurd: it's true, if you re-read njtt's post; he's not saying that you can't make up words. he's saying you can't make up words AND expect them to be readily and widely accepted or understood. Though I side with you that certain affixes can themselves be quite easily identified and understood. I have not thus far seen any word that doesn't immediately make sense. Then again, I'm also not one to say things like 'must of' and I also know the difference between their and there (something I can't say of about 80% of my friends... oi).

English: the only world language that causes confusion between two different people speaking the same words ;)

Perpendicular

  • December 6, 2011, 9:18am

Yes, widely in America herb is pronounced 'erb'. A silent h in hotel, however, I have never heard.
In any case, I don't hear much h dropping, but I had seen 'an' before h words in print in old English manuscripts, and it was the cause of much bother for me.

Questions

watch much stuff? April 18, 2012