Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

BrockawayBaby

Member Since

August 18, 2011

Total number of comments

49

Total number of votes received

163

Bio

Latest Comments

Over-use of periods

  • September 6, 2011, 11:38pm

I. s.a.y. w.e. d.o.n.t u.s.e. e.n.o.u.g.h. p.e.r.i.o.d.s. L.O.L. :)

decapitalize vs. uncapitalize

  • September 6, 2011, 11:35pm

French uses the verb "décapitalizer." I'm a teacher at a college, and I have seen the term "decapitalize" in textbooks. I suggest that you use this because of the French and the textbooks.

“It is what it is”

  • September 6, 2011, 11:28pm

Actually, Mr. Are You All Retarded?, why would you waste your time posting if you really thought we were all retarded. Your neediness is obvious, so I just want to let you know that you are safe here and that we will validate you and tell you that you are smarter than your daddy recognized :)

“It is what it is”

  • September 6, 2011, 11:25pm

@ are you all retarded?

Your response is brilliant. So deep and insightful. What a brain you must have!

Team names — singular or plural

  • August 28, 2011, 1:29am

"Group" is a collective noun. I'm an American, and the following sounds awkward to me:

"A group of people are on the attack."

But this sounds correct to me:

"A group of people is on the attack."

Is it the opposite for you English out there?

What happens when I use a collective noun in these sentences:

"There is a group."
"There are a group."

Since the verb is determined by the term "group," the British would choose the second sentence as correct, but the second sentence sounds ridiculous to my U. S. of American ear.

To be even clearer about my problem with collective nouns, here are a few more sentences, which seem incorrect to me, though they follow the British rule of always treating collective nouns as plurals:

"There are the team, Manchester United, leaving the field in glory."
"There are the band, Radiohead, conquering the world."
"There are the group of Americans messing up grammar for the rest of us."

I can't stop laughing about richardpry's pronunciation of "people". I shouldn't laugh, and no one should challenge him on it--an IQ of less that 70 is correlated to his exact pronunciation: "pee-po". LOL!

want it that way

  • August 28, 2011, 12:54am

The lyric is indeed correct as it stands. I suggest that the proper expansion is most likely this: "I want it to be that way."

You can get the response you want by asking this question:

What does the following say: 'Manmohan Singh is the Fouteenth Prime Minister of India'?

Over-use of periods

  • August 28, 2011, 12:35am

Isn't grammar separate from style, and aren't you talking about style, BobH? As I understand it, punctuation falls under the category of style.

On Tomorrow

  • August 27, 2011, 11:11pm

Pebbles--Just a minor comment on one of the terms you used, "higher-ups". It should actually be "highers-up". Check out the discussion entitled "Someone else's" and look at the comments about the plural of "passer-by".