Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Vince

Member Since

May 18, 2011

Total number of comments

5

Total number of votes received

15

Bio

Latest Comments

Over-use of periods

  • June 13, 2011, 6:24pm

I have to admit that I agree with BobH on the period abuse. It has also occurred to me that this was a new fad... and I don't like it one bit. I feel like I'm reading the prose of a manic writer, and it is utterly exhausting. Why do phrases have to be like video-clips? I can stand a few clips with their stroboscopic flow of images, but I when I read I expect to relax. Besides, I find it childish... if you cannot construct an appealing and well sounding phrase, do something else. Sheesh!

want it that way

  • June 13, 2011, 6:11pm

Well articulated njtt! There is no problem whatsoever with "I want it that way"; I like it that way", or "I prefer it that way"... these phrases mean different things, and as said by njtt above - adding an "in" would change the meaning completely.

The opposite of “awaken”?

  • May 18, 2011, 3:37pm

Oh wait! It is a word!!! In the Dictionary the example (and correct spelling) is " the child slumbered fitfully". There you go!

The opposite of “awaken”?

  • May 18, 2011, 3:35pm

"Nod off" seems correct. Doze off could be another... but it seems the question is to find a word, not a composite one, right? Hmmm... "slumbered"? "he slumbered, then was awaken"....? Tricky... that's my 2 cents, maybe only worth that much! ;0)

Interesting topic. I think misleading is worse than lying. Let me explain my perspective...
Misleading someone is lying with intent to trick that person into believing in a falsely candid truth. Most misleading statements are framed in part-truth, and that is what makes this practice particularly egregious. Anyone who hears a statement where enough truth is present, will consequently trust that statement as being a whole truth. Misleading is the number one political tool. Part truth, hidden truth (the one needing to be lied about). Lying on the other hand can be less consequential. Good manners for example, are often rooted in what we call "white lies". Example; How does my hair look? - Wonderful! (all the while thinking it looks pretty disastrous). To not hurt feelings, we all use lying as tool for kindness and politeness. Someone who would tell the truth 100% of the time would quickly be judged as a heel -- and justly so. As for more important lies (like adultery ones), they are all with the intent of misleading another. So misleading seems to take the cake here. Well, that's my take on this. Obviously, it's more complicated than that.