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monsterdog

Joined: May 5, 2011  (email not validated)
Comments posted: 5
Votes received: 1

Recent Comments

Thanks for speaking up about "is is." Haven't heard unthawed yet, but I have heard unfrozen. How do you like "less than 2% of the people" instead of "fewer than?" How 'bout lay and lie (a Pilates instructor I know says "now lie your head down") - or how about the incorrect but rather prissy objective case ("she gave Johnny and I a gift?"

Grossmama October 27, 2012, 12:28pm

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Correcting myself on my first point above:
Blue can be an adjective or a noun. Dark blue used as a noun is not hyphenated. Dark is merely an adjective modifying blue, as in "dark blue has more pigment than light blue."

Duma March 7, 2012, 5:59pm

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Blue can be an adjective or a noun. As a noun it is not hyphenated: Blue is a primary color.
As an adjective preceding a noun, it is hyphenated: I'm wearing a dark-blue shirt.
As a predicate adjective, as in "the shirt is dark blue," I believe most experts would not hyphenate because of the distance from the noun described.

Duma March 7, 2012, 5:55pm

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My husband thinks "exact same" is a Southern expression. Every time he uses it, he follows with "..as we say in the South" and thinks he is funny.
I don't know where he got this idea. Is there anything to it?

No one has mentioned "flat wrong" or "flat busted" (as in "broke"). In either case I think flat is adverbial; flat is used the same as very (= very wrong.). You could make the same argument for exact same; it just sounds dumb.

I would hyphenate dark-blue when used to modify a noun such as coat, and not when it's standing alone (his coat is dark blue=here dark blue is a predicate adjective.

monsterdog May 5, 2011, 2:02pm

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My husband thinks "exact same" is a Southern expression. Every time he uses it, he follows with "..as we say in the South" and thinks he is funny.
I don't know where he got this idea. Is there anything to it?

No one has mentioned "flat wrong" or "flat busted" (as in "broke"). In either case I think flat is adverbial; flat is used the same as very (= very wrong.). You could make the same argument for exact same; it just sounds dumb.

I would hyphenate dark-blue when used to modify a noun such as coat, and not when it's standing alone (his coat is dark blue=here dark blue is a predicate adjective.

monsterdog May 5, 2011, 2:02pm

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