Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

kathrynrobyn

Member Since

September 21, 2010

Total number of comments

2

Total number of votes received

13

Bio

Latest Comments

Capitalization of dog breeds

  • January 24, 2011, 6:31am

Yes of course it is; however I was editing a book; and grammar rules as well as style guidance can help make writing better.That's my job, to make the writing not get in the way of the story.

Capitalization of dog breeds

  • September 21, 2010, 1:31am

I am also accustomed to using the "down style" and not capping dog breeds except when a proper noun is present (German short-haired pointer). But here's my problem: Rottweiler or rottweiler? Merriam-Webster shows it not capped, but then explains the dogs hail from a city in Germany: Rottweil. Okay, so we'd cap Bostonian, wouldn't we? Why not Rottweiler? That's gotten me to thinking about the issue of "speciesism." I know, I know. But why not just cap them all -- out of *respect* -- like we do countries, tribes, teams, gangs for pete's sake? The sentence I'm editing looks silly: Labs, goldens, Dalmatians, rottweilers. I'm going to have a hard time justifying this to the author, with good reason. Chicago's wrong here, I think. Can anyone make me feel better?