Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with a passion. Learn More

Username

dogreed

Member Since

August 19, 2010

Total number of comments

26

Total number of votes received

120

Bio

Latest Comments

“As per ....”?

  • May 23, 2012, 12:58am

We hear this a lot in the US too. I think it's business-speak leaking into general speech. As with most corporate jargon, there is almost always a better phrase available.

“Anglish”

  • October 27, 2011, 11:50pm

What are you people babbling about? I thought this was a website about English, which is an actual living language, not an imaginary one.

Prepositions at the end of a clause

  • October 27, 2011, 10:53pm

Have your ears checked. There is nothing wrong in ending a sentence with a preposition.

What can I do besides...

  • October 24, 2011, 7:52pm

The word "beside" is a preposition, therefore it has no plural.

To my ear, the sentence "What can I do but complain?" sounds best. It is concise. It avoids the plural preposition and the unneeded gerund.

Brus,

I disagree. A semicolon, when used to join two phrases, each of which could be a sentence, replaces the conjunction. When a conjunction is used a comma is employed.

You need know only this: a conjunction is not needed after a semicolon because a semicolon relpaces a conjunction.

I stand by my comment. Punctuation, at its best, does not lead us through the maze of badly constructed sentences. It thrusts us through the good ones.

I hope you kept the receipt for this book, as it is rubbish. A semicolon is never used with a conjunction. In specific instances it replaces the conjunction. Others, I am sure, will explain.

“Anglish”

  • September 19, 2011, 12:35am

What are you talking about? And to whom?

It’s Official: email not e-mail

  • September 18, 2011, 6:07pm

I have always advocated against the hyphen in this case. I believe Winston Churchill would have too.