Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
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Username

wkerby

Member Since

July 12, 2008

Total number of comments

3

Total number of votes received

1

Bio

Latest Comments

Try and

  • July 14, 2008, 9:05am

A Pome for Phill

You bolloxed eubolics,
ebonics, dialects,
I wonders you walks totally erects,
Quick and clear is real good
and don't need no corrects.

Try and

  • July 12, 2008, 1:58pm

An infinitive is not the "to" form of the verb, as eighth-grade, prescriptivist English teachers proclaim, but the uninflected form, without attribution to time or individuals - thus infinite-ive. "To" helps nominalize the infinitive: "To eat is to live."
"And" has become another nominalizer as in, 'try and eat some spinach!' A gerund works nicely, too. "Try eating some spinach!"

“I haven’t known”

  • July 12, 2008, 12:29pm

Such an expression is common among native speakers of German. In German the present perfect is always the preferred usage in conversation over the "simple" past. I suspect it is more abundant in archaic English.