Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

goofy

Member Since

July 24, 2006

Total number of comments

186

Total number of votes received

557

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Latest Comments

He was sat

  • February 16, 2012, 7:26pm

It's a common British regionalism.

Actually I meant to write "Caesar's murder"

Apostrophe-s is used for things other than possession.

Caesar's murders - object genitive (ie, someone murdered Caesar)
men's shirts - genitive of purpose (shirts for men)
Terry Pratchett's latest book - genitive of origin (the latest book by Pratchett)
a year's wages - descriptive or classifying genitive

porsche, I agree that "writing books" functions as a noun. But "writing" is not a noun. Call it a gerund or "-ing" form or participle, but it's not a noun. But many usage guides say you must use a possessive in front a gerund, because a gerund is a noun. This is clearly mistaken. If they mean that when gerunds have objects, as in "writing books", that the entire "gerund phrase" functions as a noun, then that's what they should say.

“If I was” vs. “If I were”

  • November 12, 2011, 8:38pm

According to The American Heritage Book of English Usage, it is standard English.
http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3038

“If I was” vs. “If I were”

  • November 12, 2011, 2:42pm

I am not the same Goofy as the Goofy who posted those two links. When I say "evidence" I'm talking about how good writers actually write. Anyone can make a website stating their opinion. But how can any consideration of the situation ignore actual usage?

“If I was” vs. “If I were”

  • November 12, 2011, 12:27pm

Perfect Pedant:
Which evidence are you referring to? The evidence provided by MWDEU shows that both "was" and "were" are standard English. Lots of people here have stated their opinions, but I haven't seen much evidence that only "were" is standard.

“If I was” vs. “If I were”

  • November 9, 2011, 4:30am

willy wonka: I don't think you'll find any English usage book, no matter how prescriptive, that says "If I lived in Paris, I would visit the Eiffel Tower." is not correct.

“If I was” vs. “If I were”

  • November 8, 2011, 5:02pm

The MWDEU discusses the subjunctive in detail in the entry I linked to way back at the beginning of this thread:
http://books.google.ca/books?id=2yJusP0vrdgC&lpg=PA877&vq=subjunctive&dq=merriam%20websters%20dictionary%20of%20english%20usage&pg=PA876#v=onepage&q&f=false