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chad

Joined: July 18, 2004  (email not validated)
Comments posted: 15
Votes received: 7

Recent Comments

Pronunciation seems to be an issue.

http://www.davezilla.com/index.php?p=217

Asian Chew Mommy?

Chad Brandos January 10, 2005, 5:42pm

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Things can get funny when people talk about web pages. To me, several of them could work.

I just stumbled upon the Guardian Weblog's Report.

I just stumbled across the Guardian Weblog's Report.

I just stumbled into the Guardian Weblog's Report.

Chad Brandos December 6, 2004, 11:08am

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I'd say they could all be correct if used in the proper manner.

I stumbled upon a new book at the library.

I stumbled across the cost section in my presentation to the council.

I stumbled on a loose floorboard.

I stumbled into the room.

I stumbled in the bathroom.

I stumbled onto the grass.

Chad Brandos December 4, 2004, 12:45pm

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They all appear acceptable to me. English is flexible.

Chad Brandos October 24, 2004, 12:17am

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I believe its more official title is the 'Commercial At', but according to Wikipedia, the others are also acceptable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial_at

Chad Brandos October 24, 2004, 12:12am

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I work at a grocery store and recently noticed the express lane sign because of this entry. It reads "Fewer Than 10 Items." I suppose some people know the difference.

Chad Brandos September 27, 2004, 4:26pm

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Your thinking is reasonable. Hyperdictionary states that 'fewer' is for countable items, and 'less' is for comparing adjectives (less healthy). But it also mentions less is "nonstandard in some uses but often idiomatic with measure phrases". An idiom is "an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up." So basically it's just a bad expression that is going to be nearly impossible to destroy.

When I did some bookkeeping work this summer, I often heard less in a phrase like 'thirty-three dollars net income less five dollars tax'. This appears to be a correct usage. Could the 'x items of less' usage have evolved from this older sounding phrasing?

Chad Brandos September 23, 2004, 11:32pm

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If you were to say "selling your parent's home", I would assume you meant one parent. Therefore "parents' home" seems more correct in that situation.

Chad Brandos September 9, 2004, 11:31pm

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Definately after. It's an additional piece of information, but not part of the sentence.

Chad Brandos September 9, 2004, 11:29pm

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The 'my brother' part is an appositive, a description set apart from the sentence in commas. I would have to say the correct form would be

Bryan's, my brother, car...

Could be wrong here, but I would probably just reword the sentence for clarity as Rom does.

Chad Brandos August 17, 2004, 9:59pm

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I would choose "a unit". I was taught that it needed a vowel sound. 'U''s short sound is vowel like, but a long 'U' at the beginning of a word soulds like a 'y', usually not considered a vowel.

This is why most people say 'an hour' and "a usual day".

Chad Brandos August 11, 2004, 12:31pm

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The wikipedia article on 'Okay', uses the straightdope.com as one of the sources.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okay

Chad Brandos July 29, 2004, 11:41pm

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A 'couch potato' is a term for a lathargic person who is not associated with any form of aerobic activity.

Chad Brandos July 29, 2004, 11:38pm

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Wikipedia has some good--though lengthy--information on both topics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backtick

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilde

Chad Brandos July 22, 2004, 7:04pm

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This is simmilar to the usage in long distance running events. When somebody runs a 5K they mean they are running five kilometers or five thousand meters.

Chad July 18, 2004, 7:10pm

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