Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

shaunc

Member Since

December 26, 2008

Total number of comments

37

Total number of votes received

197

Bio

Latest Comments

mines

  • July 14, 2010, 6:18pm

"This book is mines", is childish. It seems that many younger people in an attempt to appear "cool" or "gangsterish" deliberately speak in a way that makes them seem uneducated. Unfortunately, such English stigmatises the speaker and makes them sound...somewhat less than intelligent.

OK vs Okay

  • July 14, 2010, 6:14pm

Quote: "The earliest claimed usage of okay is a 1790 court record from Sumner County, Tennessee, discovered in 1859 by a Tennessee historian named Albigence Waldo Putnam, in which Andrew Jackson apparently said:

"proved a bill of sale from Hugh McGary to Gasper Mansker, for a Negro man, which was O.K."[1]
What is widely regarded as the earliest known example of the modern "ok" being set down on paper is a quintessential "we arrived ok" notation in the hand-written diary of William Richardson going from Boston to New Orleans in 1815, about a month after the Battle of New Orleans. One entry says "we traveled on to N. York where we arrived all well, at 7 P.M." By most reckonings a later similar entry uses "ok" in place of "all well": "Arrived at Princeton, a handsome little village, 15 miles from N Brunswick, ok & at Trenton, where we dined at 1 P.M."[2]

There are several theories on the origin of "okay" (including 1.Greek words "Ola Kala" (??? ????) meaning "everything's good" or "all good"; used by Greek railway workers in the United States.) However, the word seems to be predate railways...

“I’m just saying”

  • July 14, 2010, 6:10pm

I think that "I'm just saying" is a passive-aggressive phrase. You have stated your opinion and you feel unsure or defensive about it. It comes across as a desperate plea to avoid giving offence. "With all due respect" was mentioned - when some prefaces a comment "with all due respect", you are about to be insulted, criticised or belittled!

In English capital letters (or majuscules) are used at the beginning of sentences and for proper nouns such as a person's name, a country's name or an organisation. In addition, majuscles are often used in headlines and advertising for visual impact. The original Latin alpahabet only used majuscles. Miniscules evolved from hand-writing of letters. The hand written letters were typical rounded and small - uncials, half-uncials and cursive appeared over time.

I think we still use capital letters because we like them. When you read a sentence or a name without capitals it doesn't look right. We also inherited capitals from old English - letters Thorn or þorn (Þ, þ) and Edh (or Eth) (Ð, ð). These letters represented various pronunciations of "th". Basically, English is a living language and customs change or do not change based on style and custom. Currently, most English speakers prefer capital letters. Maybe if people become lazier, they will vanish...

silent autumn

  • July 23, 2009, 11:38pm

Actually, depending on your accent, the "n" in autumn is not silent. With American pronunciation, the "n" cannot be heard. With certain British accents the "n" is heard...

silent autumn

  • December 26, 2008, 9:09pm

In the previous article, I of course switched the 'm' and the 'n'!

silent autumn

  • December 26, 2008, 9:07pm

There are a lot of silent letters in English. English has taken words from so many sources - Latin, Greek, French, Hindi, Arabic - just to name a few. Autumn was derived from Latin "autumnus" (via French). Latin also gives us "Vernal" for the spring equinox.

The reason for the silent 'n' in autumn is quite simple - then 'n' survived from Latin and it is virtually impossible to distinctly pronounce an 'n' in front of an 'm' in English. Who ever said English spelling was supposed to make sense!

Questions

“Anglish” July 14, 2010
Canadian pronunciation of “out and about” August 9, 2010