Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

egkg

Member Since

June 15, 2009

Total number of comments

4

Total number of votes received

4

Bio

Latest Comments

Loose = Lose?

  • September 16, 2009, 1:15pm

I'm inclined to lump "loose/lose" in with "your/you're/ur (and even 'yore'!)" and "there/there/their". While it's easy to confuse them, there's really no excuse.

I don't remember seeing the "loose/lose" problem until fairly recently.

I looked at a couple of sample release forms for photographers I found on the Web, and most seem to give permission to take a photo, and also allow for the use, duplication and/or distribute the photo without a fee being imposed by the person whose image or photograph is used.

Here's a link to one of the samples:
http://www.eed.state.ak.us/aksca/pdf/photo_release_form_sample.pdf

I'm not a lawyer either, but my gut feeling on this one is that the AAA's family would sign a waiver, which would release the hospital from any liability.
To make matters more confusing, AAA's parents could sign a release, waiving their right to take legal action.

on “condition”

  • July 29, 2009, 3:30pm

If I understand the question, when the condition is a phrase, I'd use "if" or "when" instead. For example, rather than "Under the conditions of high heat, the solution may oxidize rapidly," I'd use "When the temperature is above X degrees, the substance may explode," or "If the temperature exceeds X, then run for your life."

Is that an option?

Questions

Plural of “insurance”? June 9, 2009
Sarcasm mark? January 13, 2010