Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Areitoyaya

Member Since

June 5, 2018

Total number of comments

3

Total number of votes received

13

Bio

Latest Comments

I think that the best thing you can do it those kinds of situations is try to rephrase the sentence in order to not make it look so awkward.
Generally speaking, those examples you have look correct-ish but it's debatable.

I am so sorry

  • June 5, 2018, 6:01pm

What happens is that those kind of phrases are used immediately or shortly after said incident happens so speakers take it as a nuance to repeat what you did to the recipient.
Agreeing with Dyske here, "so" replaces "extremely" or any other intensifying adverb in regular speech. For example, we don't say "I am extremely sorry"; we say, "I am SOOO sorry". Speakers use "so" when they are explaining something like a retelling of an event and even this is optional. For example, you could either say "I talked so fast" or "I talked so fast nobody could understand me". The second one is to give the recipient an idea of how fast you were actually talking.

Double Words

  • June 5, 2018, 5:51pm

As far as I have studied the English language. I have yet to find an example where someone uses the word "I's" in a sentence. Most people use the genitive (possessive) "my" so it would be "John, Joe's and my baseball ticket..." What is happening over here in the United States is that there seems to be a new case forming among the newer generations -'(s) is becoming the genitive case. This also seems to be happening in African American Vernacular English where a habitual case formed giving us "I be doin' homework" which if translated into standard English would be "I do my homework at times."
New intricacies like these are constantly forming in different dialects which is what makes linguistics such a fun field. Most times, when these things become more common, they are accepted by the people regulating the language. Over time, that dialect can eventually become ITS OWN LANGUAGE! This is what happened with Latin and it is also the fate of the English language.