Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the EnglishProofreading Service - Pain in the English
 

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

 

Username

Courtbard

Member Since

August 16, 2012

Total number of comments

1

Total number of votes received

0

Bio

Latest Comments

Anglican

  • August 16, 2012, 7:57am

Clarification... Anglo can not refer to the UK or all "British" and "Britain" because not all parts of the UK are "Anglo." Remember Anglo refers to the people that settled into the area of the British Isles that became known as the Kingdom of England - the Anglo-Saxons. That's the eastern part of the country. To the north were the Picts and eventually the Scots, to the west were the Welsh, in the kingdoms of, respectfully, Scotland and Wales. So when you see Anglo being used as an adjective prefix, as in an Anglophile, it means that person is studying specifically English history, which will include Ireland, Manx, Scotland, and Wales, after England conquered them all, but doesn't before that time of annexation or after such things as Ireland's independence. Hence the reason for calling the "Church of England" the Angl(o)ican Church as it was establish by the King of England, Henry the VIII for the Kingdom of England. When the church's congregation spread, especially to areas of the United States, which fought for independence from England they certainly were not going to call themselves the "Church of England" over here surrounded by founding father patriots of the country. At the same time the couldn't lie about who they were either, so they chose a different way of describing themselves abroad...the Anglican Church. There wouldn't have been a description for "Anglo-Catholic" because Henry wasn't looking to be Catholic. He was cutting himself and his kingdom from that faith entirely where he (and after him the ruling monarchs of his kingdom) were the head of the church not some other "governing" body that could pose possible threat to his authority or religious decisions.