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Frank35

Joined: August 13, 2012  (email not validated)
Comments posted: 4
Votes received: 17

Recent Comments

No, the company know how their company name and product should be spoken by us, the consumer. We are under obligation to get the name of the company and the product right. It's a poor excuse to try and get out of admitting you've been using the wrong phrasing for LEGO all your life. It's a weak argument that just doesn't work.

You ignored, yet again my sheep comment. We say we saw a sheep. We say we saw some sheep.

We say we have a LEGO brick. We say we have some LEGO. You want to talk about how English speakers decide how the language works, but you seem to forget how the English language does work, and you're just making up your own rules as you go to try and justify being wrong.

The fact also remains that LEGO is not English in the first place, it is Dutch, and comes from the Danish phrase "leg godt", which means "play well". You remove the entire point of the name by using the incorrect phrasing.

So whether you like it or not, the company is right and well within their rights to tell anyone who uses the ridiculous term "Legos" that they are wrong, because it is wrong. It's English user arrogance that tries to justify their wrong useage with weak arguments. Especially when we're not even discussing English in the first place, we're discussing Dutch.

But I'm sure you'll ignore my sheep comment, yet again, and ramble on how it's the English speakers who apparently make up their own rules even when it's wrong.

Christ, I've never heard such a weak argument to try justify wrong useage of a phrase in my life.

Either way, this is the end of our discussion. "Legos" is wrong, whether you like it or not. There's a reason why "Legos" isn't even in the dictionary, or on the company site, and why the rest of the world but America do not use the term. Because the company name, product is "LEGO", plain and simple, and it comes from a Dutch phrase.

Try and justify your wrong useage all you want, it'll never be right.

Frank35- August 14, 2012, 11:16am

2 votes    Permalink    Report Abuse

Ugh, won't let me use Frank35 again.

It's company name, it's company product. Sorry, I think they are well within their rights to correct people when it comes to their name and product. Lets not forget the fact LEGO is Danish in the first place, so we aren't even talking about English. LEGO comes from a Danish phrase.

Either way the companies opinion is perfectly relevant when it comes to their company name and the product they make, and the language it originated from.

What you're essentially saying it, just because Americans use the term "Legos" instead of "LEGO" which you'll probably find anyone outside of America uses when discussing LEGO (I have yet to meet anyone from anywhere but America who uses the term), it's somehow right and anything the company says won't matter, end of discussion.
That, to me, and no offence intended when I say this, is a cheap excuse to try and get away with being wrong when the term "Legos" is wrong.

You also didn't touch upon my sheep comment. We say we saw a sheep. We say we saw some sheep.

We have a LEGO brick. We have a box/tub of LEGO.

And of course it would appear the usual phrase for LEGO is LEGO from the Oxford English Dictionary, because, like I already said, "Legos" is an Americanism. The rest of the world? It's just LEGO. But like I said, Americans will defend their use of "Legos" to the death, using any weird logic they can, instead of admitting it's wrong.

Frank35- August 13, 2012, 7:17pm

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Think of sheep. You see one sheep, you say "I saw a sheep".

You see multiple sheep, you don't say "I saw some sheeps" you say "I saw some sheep".

Apply that to LEGO. "I have one LEGO Brick" or "I have some LEGO". That's how this works. "Legos" doesn't sound right at all.

Unfortunately, as I'm sure people have brought up, this is an American term that seems to get tossed around a lot, and the rest of us around the world are left to wonder "what?" because it's just plain wrong. LEGO themselves have shown that it's just plain wrong.

The horrible thing is, instead of accepting that it is wrong, people who do use the term "Legos" will defend their use of it to the death. There has never been any harm in sitting down and saying "you're right, it's wrong". I've done it hundreds of times when I've been wrong. People need to accept that "Legos" is wrong, just as you wouldn't say "sheeps".

Franky35 August 13, 2012, 5:25pm

1 vote    Permalink    Report Abuse

Think of sheep. You see one sheep, you say "I saw a sheep".

You see multiple sheep, you don't say "I saw some sheeps" you say "I saw some sheep".

Apply that to LEGO. "I have one LEGO Brick" or "I have some LEGO". That's how this works. "Legos" doesn't sound right at all.

Unfortunately, as I'm sure people have brought up, this is an American term that seems to get tossed around a lot, and the rest of us around the world are left to wonder "what?" because it's just plain wrong. LEGO themselves have shown that it's just plain wrong.

The horrible thing is, instead of accepting that it is wrong, people who do use the term "Legos" will defend their use of it to the death. There has never been any harm in sitting down and saying "you're right, it's wrong". I've done it hundreds of times when I've been wrong. People need to accept that "Legos" is wrong, just as you wouldn't say "sheeps".

Frank35 August 13, 2012, 5:25pm

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