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Lawpilot

Joined: November 20, 2016
Comments posted: 3
Votes received: 3

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Recent Comments

"Just prior" is bad English regardless of its reference to time or space. English is supposed to be communicative. "Just" anything communicates "only." For example "just $10" means only $10. But, "just prior" means nothing because "prior" is not a point of reference. "Just prior to the turn-off" could mean one mile, ten miles, . . . before the turn-off. Correct English would be "half mile before the exit," or "one minute before the exit if you are traveling at 55MPH." 11/20/2016.

Lawpilot November 20, 2016, 1:17pm

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Goofy is wrong wrong wrong! First of all, "got" is the past tense of "to get." Second, juxtaposing "have" with "got" is bad English, even if the President does routingly. You would never answer "i got three dollars in my pocket" when asked how much money you have in your pocket. To say "have gotten" would be OK to convey that you have obtained something.

To all of those who think "have got to go" i have news for you, "gotta" is also bad English for adults. 11/20/2016.

Lawpilot15 November 20, 2016, 10:32am

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Goofy is wrong wrong wrong! First of all, "got" is the past tense of "to get." Second, juxtaposing "have" with "got" is bad English, even if the President does routingly. You would never answer "i got three dollars in my pocket" when asked how much money you have in your pocket. To say "have gotten" would be OK to convey that you have obtained something.

To all of those who think "have got to go" i have news for you, "gotta" is also bad English for adults. 11/20/2016.

Lawpilot November 20, 2016, 10:30am

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