Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Lawpilot

Member Since

November 20, 2016

Total number of comments

3

Total number of votes received

7

Bio

Latest Comments

use of “prior” in space vs. time

  • November 20, 2016, 1:17pm

"Just prior" is bad English regardless of its reference to time or space. English is supposed to be communicative. "Just" anything communicates "only." For example "just $10" means only $10. But, "just prior" means nothing because "prior" is not a point of reference. "Just prior to the turn-off" could mean one mile, ten miles, . . . before the turn-off. Correct English would be "half mile before the exit," or "one minute before the exit if you are traveling at 55MPH." 11/20/2016.

“I’ve got” vs. “I have”

  • November 20, 2016, 10:32am

Goofy is wrong wrong wrong! First of all, "got" is the past tense of "to get." Second, juxtaposing "have" with "got" is bad English, even if the President does routingly. You would never answer "i got three dollars in my pocket" when asked how much money you have in your pocket. To say "have gotten" would be OK to convey that you have obtained something.

To all of those who think "have got to go" i have news for you, "gotta" is also bad English for adults. 11/20/2016.

“I’ve got” vs. “I have”

  • November 20, 2016, 10:30am

Goofy is wrong wrong wrong! First of all, "got" is the past tense of "to get." Second, juxtaposing "have" with "got" is bad English, even if the President does routingly. You would never answer "i got three dollars in my pocket" when asked how much money you have in your pocket. To say "have gotten" would be OK to convey that you have obtained something.

To all of those who think "have got to go" i have news for you, "gotta" is also bad English for adults. 11/20/2016.